2 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2022
    1. Gesturing also increases as afunction of difficulty: the more challenging the problem, and the more optionsthat exist for solving it, the more we gesture in response.

      When presented with problems people are prone to gesture more with the increasing challenges of those problems. The more ways there are to solve a particular problem, the more gesturing one is likely to do.


      What sort of analysis could one do on politicians who gesture their speech with relation to this? For someone like Donald J. Trump who floats balloons (ideas--cross reference George Lakoff) in his speeches, is he actively gesturing in an increased manner as he's puzzling out what is working for an audience and what isn't? Does the gesturing decrease as he settles on the potential answers?

    2. On other occasions,gesture supplies meaning that is not found anywhere in the speaker’s words

      Gesture can supply contextual meaning of a speaker's meaning that isn't found in their spoken words.


      What potential implications might this have to famous examples of visual versus non-visual communication, specfically: - The Kennedy/Nixon debates in which television and radio audiences had different perceptions of who won or lost. - Donald J. Trump's speeches where his politicobabble could be construed to mean almost anything to any listener, but his gestures may sway the meaning to a more concrete meaning.