8 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2022
    1. one finds in Deutsch’s catalogue one implementation of what LorraineDaston would later term ‘mechanical objectivity’, an ideal of removing the scholar’s selffrom the process of research and especially historical and scientific representation (Das-ton and Galison, 2007: 115-90).

      In contrast to the sort of mixing of personal life and professional life suggested by C. Wright Mills' On Intellectual Craftsmanship (1952), a half century earlier Gotthard Deutsch's zettelkasten method showed what Lorraine Datson would term 'mechanical objectivity'. This is an interesting shift in philosophical perspective of note taking practice. It can also be compared and contrasted with a 21st century perspective of "personal" knowledge management.

    1. Will October 2 edited October 2 Flag Thank you for your thoughtful review of C. Wright Mills' "On Intellectual Craftsmanship." You are correct in saying, "he talks more about the thinking, outlining, and writing process rather than the mechanical portion of how he takes notes or what he uses, he's extending significantly on ideas and methods..." Mills is interested in conveying the how of thinking and less so the mechanics. Mills is agreeably tool agnostic and focuses more on the process. There was an earlier discussion on the topic you might be interested in. Don't let the title of the thread fool you. What are the Implications of the new note-taking app wave? — Zettelkasten Forum Here are the 20 zettel I created processing "On Intellectual Craftsmanship." They are not in an elegant display form like yours, but I want to share them. It is in a folder archive that can be opened and read in any text editor and navigated when opened in The Archive. On Intellectual Craftsmanship

      Thanks for the pointer @Will and for sharing your notes! We definitely need better and easier ways of sharing notes like this.

    1. There is a difference between various modes of note taking and their ultimate outcomes. Some is done for learning about an area and absorbing it into one's own source of general knowledge. Others are done to collect and generate new sorts of knowledge. But some may be done for raw data collection and analysis. Beatrice Webb called this "scientific note taking".

      Historian Jacques Goutor talks about research preparation for this sort of data collecting and analysis though he doesn't give it a particular name. He recommends reading papers in related areas to prepare for the sort of data acquisition one may likely require so that one can plan out some of one's needs in advance. This will allow the researcher, especially in areas like history or sociology, the ability to preplan some of the sorts of data and notes they'll need to take from their historical sources or subjects in order to carry out their planned goals. (p8)

      C. Wright Mills mentions (On Intellectual Craftsmanship, 1952) similar research planning whereby he writes out potential longer research methods even when he is not able to spend the time, effort, energy, or other (financial) resources to carry out such plans. He felt that just the thought experiments and exercise of doing such unfulfilled research often bore fruit in his other sociological endeavors.

    1. Mills, C. Wright. “On Intellectual Craftsmanship (1952).” Society 17, no. 2 (January 1, 1980): 63–70. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02700062.

      Cross reference published version from 1959, 1980: https://hypothes.is/a/7NmPckD4Ee2-r1NbihZN2A

      Read on 2022-10-01 14:10

    2. this draft,which Mills notes on the manuscript was "written in April 1952" and distributed f o r classroom use in1955, provides a fascinating self-portrait of Mills' own sense o f intellectual craftsmanship.
  2. Sep 2022