14 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2022
    1. https://twinery.org/

      Twine is an open-source tool for telling interactive, nonlinear stories.

      You don’t need to write any code to create a simple story with Twine, but you can extend your stories with variables, conditional logic, images, CSS, and JavaScript when you're ready.

      Twine publishes directly to HTML, so you can post your work nearly anywhere. Anything you create with it is completely free to use any way you like, including for commercial purposes.


      Heard referenced in Reclaim Hosting community call as a method for doing "clue boards".


      Could twinery.org be used as a way to host/display one's linked zettelkasten or note card collection?

  2. Mar 2022
    1. Sarah Scannell’s murder board. It takes up nearly an entire wall of her San Francisco apartment: 100 pages with torn edges, painstakingly taped up with blue painter’s tape in a pattern that only makes sense to Scannell. Maybe you’ve even watched it evolve—at first the pages were connected with white string, but Scannell has since adopted a more user-friendly color-coding scheme involving sticky index tabs.

      Perhaps an interesting example of a murder board for J.D. Connor?

  3. Feb 2022
    1. Two things are worth noting here: the nests and the non-linearity. The different layers are nested in structure. Hunches come together to form ideas which come together to form stories. But sequence only becomes critical in the top layers: stories, arguments, chapters. The different between the two stages is like the difference between the pushpin evidence board from The Wire — a scattered network of clues and potential connections—and a prosecutor’s closing statement in a criminal trial.
    1. As Phil Gyford, who runs a Tumblr named Crazy Walls dedicated to curating this trope, suggested: “For a police investigation, it makes visible all the suspects, evidence, and locations in a way that looks better than people standing in an empty room talking or looking at a computer screen. It’s a handy visual shorthand.”
    2. “The NSC does use a board and yarn, but spends too much time meeting about what color yarn to use for it to ever work,” joked former National Security Council official Perry Blatstein.
    3. Companies like Palantir and i2 Analyst’s Notebook have made a killing over the last 15 years selling link chart technologies to the intelligence community (even if, in the case of the former, the relationship has cooled).
    4. The earliest version of it seems to have come from the 1979 BBC production of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, which had an understated series of red lines connecting photos to a calendar in one episode.
  4. Jan 2022
    1. ike Jungius, Boyle made use of loose folio sheets that he called memorials or adversaria; yet he did not worry too much about a system of self-referential relationships that enabled intentional knowl-edge retrieval. When he realized that he was no longer able to get his bearings in an ocean of paper slips, he looked for a way out, testing several devices, such as colored strings or labels made of letters and numeral codes. Unfortunately, it was too late. As Richard Yeo clearly noted, ‘this failure to develop an effective indexing system resulted from years of trusting in memory in tandem with notes’.69

      69 Yeo, ‘Loose Notes’, 336

      Robert Boyle kept loose sheets of notes, which he called memorials or adversaria. He didn't have a system of organization for them and tried out variations of colored strings, labels made of letters, and numerical codes. Ultimately his scrap heap failed him for lack of any order and his trust in memory to hold them together failed.


      I love the idea of calling one's notes adversaria. The idea calls one to compare one note to another as if they were combatants in a fight (for truth).


      Are working with one's ideas able to fit into the idea of adversarial interoperability?

  5. Sep 2021
  6. Aug 2021