22 Matching Annotations
  1. Dec 2022
    1. https://austinkleon.com/2018/03/04/card-games/

      I'm reminded of early French use of playing cards for note taking here...

    2. Then I remembered a little card game I came up with to make jam sessions more interesting: Have each band member list 10 musical acts they’d like to play in Write each musical act on an index card Shuffle the cards, and, without revealing the cars, deal one to each band member. Keep the cards secret — the game is no fun if you can see the cards before you play. Just like any other jam session, it helps to pick a key and start with the rhythm. Everyone has to pretend like they’re playing in the act written on their card. Jam until it gets boring. At the end, everybody gets to guess which card each person was dealt. Repeat until you’re out of cards

      A game by Austin Kleon for making jam sessions less boring using cards.

      Inspired by Oblique Strategies and The Creative Tarot.

  2. Nov 2022
    1. https://www.reddit.com/r/antinet/comments/z3f8kb/oblique_strategies_a_custom_zettelkasten_for/

      Brian Eno and Peter Schmidt published a card index of un-numbered and purposefully unordered ideas in 1975 as a tool for increasing creativity. They called it "Oblique Strategies". Each card contained an aphorism for helping one to reframe their approach to problems or questions they faced.

      Black box with cards containing aphorisms to help increase creativity. Photo by V&A Images from the David Bowie Archive.

      Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oblique_Strategies<br /> Canonical site with complete list of versions: http://www.rtqe.net/ObliqueStrategies/OSintro.html

      ZK practitioners might profitably have a subsection in their box with these strategies to help themselves randomly increase their own creativity while working either inside or outside of their boxes. Potentially useful for writing, music, art, etc.

    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRc7MUybCsE

      Interview with BBC in which Brian Eno discusses the origin of his Oblique Strategies with Peter Schmidt.

    2. Changing the order in which you do things. —Brian Eno, Oblique Strategies

      This sounds like the sort of shift Walter Murch made in his sound editing by doing his first cut completely without sound. If you can't tell the story visually without sound the whole thing will fall apart. But you can use the sound, music, etc. to supplement, gild, and improve a picture.

    1. Austin Kleon made his own deck of Oblique Strategies by handwriting them onto the front of playing cards with black sharpie.

      Making my own Oblique Strategies deck. https://t.co/a1FpNifdLp pic.twitter.com/XsnRBt0GNW

      — Austin Kleon (@austinkleon) November 1, 2015
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    1. https://www.evernote.com/shard/s204/client/snv?noteGuid=5b7828b7-c4f9-4242-b62f-788eeb44c76e&noteKey=34f69bfeebbb6bca&sn=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.evernote.com%2Fshard%2Fs204%2Fsh%2F5b7828b7-c4f9-4242-b62f-788eeb44c76e%2F34f69bfeebbb6bca&title=Powerful%252C%2Bnon-judgmental%2Bquestions

      Powerful, non-judgmental questions

      • If you had to guess, what would have to be true for you to...?
      • If you did know...
      • (on tangent) ...and how does that relate to you?
      • What's not allowing you to...?
      • What prevents you from asking…?
      • Do you want to go into this?
      • What's your criteria for saying yes?
      • What would have you say yes?
      • What are the things we're lacking?
      • What's the scary question that you're not asking?
      • What are the qualities you want for [being, action, process, etc.]?
      • How would you behave if you were the best in the world at what you do?

      I'm starting a list of powerful, non-judgmental questions for coaching or just relationships in general. Here's the starting batch https://t.co/ktsYVxkQna pic.twitter.com/Dq1zQnWqAS

      — Tiago Forte (@fortelabs) January 15, 2019
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      These questions and similar ones (work this out) could be interesting prompts to be included on a syllabus or as starts for an annotated syllabus. (eg: What do you want to get out of this class? What do you already know about these areas? How can we expand on what you know? What would you like to explore?, etc.)