6 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2022
    1. Forms w e d in footnote citations. The following formsare in standard use in footnote citations: id. (idem, thesame), meaning by the same author as the book last cited;ibid. (ibidem, in the same place), meaning in the same bookas the one last cited; op. cit. (opere citato, in the workcited), meaning in the author’s work cited in an earlier, butnot immediately preceding, footnote in the same chapter; Zoc.cit. (loco citato, in the place cited), meaning the author’sarticle in the periodical or review previously cited in thesame chapter; cf. (confer, compare), meaning compare thestatement in the text with the one cited in the footnote eon-cerned; supra (above) and infra (below) or ante (before)and post (after), used to cite passages earlier or later inthe book or article itself; passim (scattered), sometimesused instead of exact citations when references to the sub-ject are scattered freely through a work; et seq. ( a t sequen-tee, and following), meaning on the several successive pagesfollowing the one cited, but the English abbreviation, ff.(following) is more commonly used instead. In the last twocases, however, it is preferable to give the exact page cita-tions instead of the vague reference.

      a nice little collections of notations used in footnotes in the early 20th century.

      Not all of these are seen or commonly used now.

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  2. Jan 2022
  3. Sep 2021
    1. Proof-of-work methods (e.g. blockchains) are harmful for sustainability (s12y).

      First time I've seen s12y as abbreviation for sustainability.

      Also makes me wonder if I should make sesquipedaliantly into s15y? It would be more fun if it were s18y so that the 18 could refer to 12+6 inches which is a foot and a half matching up with sesquipedalian's root definition.

  4. Dec 2020
    1. When you mean “for example,” use e.g. It is an abbreviation for the Latin phrase exempli gratia.

      I did not know e.g was a stand in for a latin phrase.

  5. Mar 2015