13 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2022
  2. Oct 2022
  3. Jul 2022
    1. But online information has a very weak link to memory.

      Why is memory for online pieces weaker for most?

      Is it the lack of sense of "physical" location for helping to store it? What about the seemingly ephemeral character of online data?

  4. May 2022
    1. I like how Dr. Pacheco-Vega outlines some of his research process here.

      Sharing it on Twitter is great, and so is storing a copy on his website. I do worry that it looks like the tweets are embedded via a simple URL method and not done individually, which means that if Twitter goes down or disappears, so does all of his work. Better would be to do a full blockquote embed method, so that if Twitter disappears he's got the text at least. Images would also need to be saved separately.

    1. the decentralised and open source nature of these systems, where anyone can host an instance, may protect their communities from the kinds of losses experienced by users of the many commercial platforms that have gone out of business over the last decades (e.g. Geocities, Wikispaces or Google + to name just a few).

      https://indieweb.org/site-deaths names a large number of others

    1. https://www.robinsloan.com/lab/lost-thread/

      Twitter may have felt like the dial tone of the internet for several years, but I'm starting to feel like the tide has changed. Twitter has started a decline and ideas and energy are now slowly flowing to new growth on the internet. It may take a while, but unless Twitter does something drastic and amazing, they're going to slowly bleed out and die.

    2. Arguing about the future of Twit­ter is a loser’s game; a dead end. The plat­form’s only con­clu­sion can be abandonment: an over­due MySpace-ification.

      I love the verbifification of MySpace here. Its one of the earliest and most popular social media platforms which is now primarily known for its spectacular collapse and death as a social platform.

  5. Jan 2022
  6. Nov 2021
  7. Oct 2020
    1. Screenshots are disposable, but highlights are forever.

      Highlighting this sentence on the Highly blog (on Medium) ironically using Hypothes.is. I'm syndicating a copy over to my own website because I know that most social services are not long for this world. The only highlights that live forever are the ones you keep on your own website or another location that you own and control.

      RIP Highly. Viva IndieWeb!

    1. we are ending the HuffPost contributor platform

      Just another site-death...

      Ben Walsh of the LA Times Data Desk has created a simple web interface at www.SaveMy.News that journalists can use to archive their stories to The Internet Archive and WebCite. One can log into the service via Twitter and later download a .csv file with a running list of all their works with links to the archived copies.