502 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2024
  2. Mar 2024
    1. The link of the video should be there not the youtube home page.

      A bug I have too now that I use Librewolf, I hope this can be fixed soon.

  3. Feb 2024
    1. A useful model for note-taking is that of system 1 and 2 thinking. Try to do as much as possible in system 1. So, most work is done without much work and effort. Chris places his hypothesis.is workflow within system 1.

  4. Jan 2024
  5. Dec 2023
    1. As always, the annotations you see will be yours, those posted in Public, and those posted in groups of which you are a member.

      The real question is: how to exclude some results?

      For example, I have few annotations under tag search results, but there are some of mine, and I want to see only those which are not mine, but others. How can I accomplish that?

      It would be helpful, because it provides solution for excluding from results users or websites which are unworthy or spammed with worthless annotations.

    2. Annotating the YouTube video

      Misleading!

      You are going to annotate transcript, not the YouTube video, so when video does not have any transcript you are not able to annotate anything.

    1. I've noticed that sometime in December 2023, Hypothes.is has updated their public software to include the page number of the pdf annotations are made in into their user interface.

    Tags

    Annotators

  6. Oct 2023
    1. La riqueza analítica de estas publicaciones es incuestionable. Nos proporcio - naron a quienes estudiamos la migración y la xenofobia una oportunidad gratuita de conocer las opiniones respecto a la inmigración en nuestro país. Sin embargo, estas encuestas, como otras que implementan universidades —sobre las que se detallará más adelante—, presentan una ceguera de género por la que no sólo exploran, sino que también reproducen una realidad migratoria androcéntrica y por tanto, equivo -cada

      Me parece interesante la transparencia con la que se maneja la información en el documento, ya que te mencionan de antemano que las encuestas reflejan ceguera de genero y una realidad migratoria androcéntrica.

  7. Sep 2023
  8. Aug 2023
  9. Jun 2023
    1. (1:21:20-1:39:40) Chris Aldrich describes his hypothes.is to Zettelkasten workflow. Prevents Collector's Fallacy, still allows to collect a lot. Open Bucket vs. Closed Bucket. Aldrich mentions he uses a common place book using hypothes.is which is where all his interesting highlights and annotations go to, unfiltered, but adequately tagged. This allows him to easily find his material whenever necessary in the future. These are digital. Then the best of the best material that he's interested in and works with (in a project or writing sense?) will go into his Zettelkasten and become fully fledged. This allows to maintain a high gold to mud (signal to noise) ratio for the Zettelkasten. In addition, Aldrich mentions that his ZK is more of his own thoughts and reflections whilst the commonplace book is more of other people's thoughts.

  10. May 2023
  11. Apr 2023
    1. @mentions to direct your conversations to the right people.

      This is good news!

    2. Link: https://wordpress.org/plugins/hypothesis/

      Note that on the page is warning:

      This plugin has been closed as of January 28, 2022 and is not available for download. Reason: Guideline Violation.

    3. Practically useless, unless you are a teacher who wants to review students' annotations. So it should be named differently. I do not know where I can make notes in that Notebook… In personal work I see no usage of that, unfortunately. You are able to see only annotations form private layer, not your private annotation from public layer (which has no sens, but who cares), so you cannot see only-yours (which means private) annotation on public layer, because, you know, thanks for clear terminology, there are public-private and private-private annotations. So it has sense only when you are a teacher with grouped students, because you can review annotations in each group, which is nonpublic (so kinda private) by definition, but shared (kinda public) within group, and you will be fine. At that point i get it. But when you are a single person, who wants to use that as your personal tool, what is the point? And I cannot find any helpful use case of that, maybe because it is still in early stage, event it has been introduced two years ago, so it tells something…

    4. Is someone really using this? I feel like it is dead feature. I thought it is something for making notes on pages, because you access this from specific page not activity page and it is called Notebook, but it shows everything from profile, but besides what is public, like limited dashboard, so I do not get this. More I learn more I am confused and discouraged.

    5. Resources

      Links and resources from the second half of the chat and Q&A:

      Video

      <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/KkgXkJZXa0E" title="YouTube video player" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture; web-share" allowfullscreen></iframe>

      Watch on YouTube

    1. Narzędzia do Hypothes.is https://jonudell.info/h/tools.html

      • facet tools - wyszukiwarka
      • copy annotations - kopiowanie zaznaczeń
      • tag rename - zmiana tagów
      • annotation powered survey - rozszerzona wyszukiwarka
      • pagefit - skrypt pozwalający dostosować szerokość strony po wysunięciu panelu hypothes.is.

      Przydałoby się jeszcze narzędzie pozwalające zablokować panel tak, aby nie zwijał się w momencie interakcji z elementami strony.

    1. Beata Tworzewska-Pozłutko, Cyfrowe adnotacje w dydaktyce

    2. Narzędzie może mieć oczywiście wiele różnych zastosowań, ale to które nas najbardziej interesuje to zastosowanie w dydaktyce.

      Właściwie Hypothes.is, z tego co widzę i jak rozumiem działania twórców, ogranicza się do szkolnictwa. Dlatego też usługa nie jest rozwijana w kierunku potrzeb użytkownika indywidualnego.

    3. Przykłady konkretnych tekstów źródłowych analizowanych w ramach zajęć

      Na pewno przydałyby się przykłady w języku polskim. A przede wszystkim wyczerpujące studium przypadku. Sam jeszcze z takowym się nie spotkałem. W ogóle odnoszę wrażenie, że w polskojęzycznej części internetu Hipothes.is nie istnieje…

  12. Mar 2023
    1. By asking students to share their annotations openly, we help students to see a wide range of annotation practices, thus demystifying what has often been a private, individual practice.

      Of course, some of the private, individual practice can be terribly formed and generally useless for many, so it becomes imperative that students have some strong modeling here from the rhetorical side. What exactly do "good" and "useful" practices look like? How are these annotations used after-the-fact? What purposes do they serve? Can they be reused? Even with open annotations, there is still a lot of additional practice and use which happens beyond the visible annotation which is hidden.

      How can we leverage the open annotation and the following process (for example that of Ahrens2017 or Eco2015, 1977) to show more of the workflows of not only learning/understanding/sensemaking, but then taking that material to apply, analyze, evaluate, and then subsequently create new material?

      I see a lot of this sort of community sensemaking in the fora for digital note taking tools like Roam Research, Obsidian, Tana, etc. People there may sometimes be more focused on workflows for productivity sake, but there's a lot of subtle learning about note taking practice which is also going on between the lines.

    1. paper focuses on the importance of annotation in education, summarizes key research findings about social annotation and student learning, and includes testimonials from instructors representing a range of disciplines who have incorporated social annotation as an important aspect of their teaching.

    2. Highlights are private

      And only private. It seems you can not highlight publicly, unless you put at least one tag. A highlight with a comment is an annotation. An annotation without a highlight is Page Note (you need add it in separate pane).

    3. A private annotation will have a lock icon underneath your username, next to the name of the layer where you made the annotation.
    4. You will see a small lock icon next to your annotation, indicating that it is now private and visible to only you

      Is it still working? I do not see it on my browsers. I have checked it in Safari, Waterfox, Brave, even in Chrome and Firefox.

    5. You will see a small lock icon next to your annotation, indicating that it is now private and visible to only you

      But it is still called Public, which is misleading. So it is Public annotation, but visible Only for User. It should be called Private. What is the sense for doing it that way?

    1. I found the format of these Hypothes.is notes to be much more readable than the notes on the same topic in Evernote.

      https://forum.zettelkasten.de/discussion/comment/17617#Comment_17617

      There is definitely something here from a usability (and reusability) perspective when notes are broken down into smaller pieces the way that is encouraged by Hypothes.is or by writing on index cards.

      Compare: - ://www.evernote.com/shard/s170/sh/d69cf793-1f14-48f4-bd48-43f41bd88678/DapavVTQh954eMRGKOVeEPHm7FxEqxBKvaKLfKWaSV1yuOmjREsMkSHvmQ - https://via.hypothes.is/https://www.otherlife.co/pkm/

      The first may be most useful for a note taker who is personally trying to make sense of material, but it becomes a massive wall of text that one is unlikely to re-read or attempt to reuse at a later date. If they do attempt to reuse it at a later date, it's not clear which parts are excerpts of the original and which are the author's own words. (This page also looks like it's the sort of notes, highlighting, and underlining recommended by Tiago Forte's Building a Second Brain text using progressive summarization.)

      The second set, are more concrete, more atomic, more understandable, and also as a result much more usable.

    1. Google Books .pdf document equivalence problem #7884

      I've noticed on a couple of .pdf documents from Google books that their fingerprints, lack thereof, or some other glitch in creating document equivalency all seem to clash creating orphans.

      Example, the downloadable .pdf of Geyer's Stationer 1904 found at https://www.google.com/books/edition/Geyer_s_Stationer/L507AQAAMAAJ?hl=en&gbpv=0 currently has 109 orphaned annotations caused by this issue.

      See also a specific annotation on this document: https://hypothes.is/a/vNmUHMB3Ee2VKgt4yhjofg

  13. learn-ap-southeast-2-prod-fleet01-xythos.content.blackboardcdn.com learn-ap-southeast-2-prod-fleet01-xythos.content.blackboardcdn.com
    1. Our technology is open source and interoperable

      And still has no official browser extensions for other browsers than chromium-based.

    2. Annotation is a common practice when students learn another language.

      But it is closed only to English. Or am I missing something and there are another translations of app interface and documentation?

    3. Hypothesis is flexible and efficient, intuitive and easy to navigate, and interactive with and encouraging of various social activities like collaboration and commentary

      Unfortunately, I am not sure about it…

    1. how did you teach yourself zettelkasten? .t3_11ay28d._2FCtq-QzlfuN-SwVMUZMM3 { --postTitle-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postTitleLink-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postBodyLink-VisitedLinkColor: #989898; }

      reply to u/laystitcher at https://www.reddit.com/r/Zettelkasten/comments/11ay28d/how_did_you_teach_yourself_zettelkasten/

      Roughly in order: - Sixth grade social studies class assignment that used a "traditional" index card-based note taking system. - Years of annotating books - Years of blogging - Havens, Earle. Commonplace Books: A History of Manuscripts and Printed Books from Antiquity to the Twentieth Century. New Haven, CT: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, 2001. - Locke, John, 1632-1704. A New Method of Making Common-Place-Books. 1685. Reprint, London, 1706. https://archive.org/details/gu_newmethodmaki00lock/mode/2up. - Erasmus, Desiderius. Literary and Educational Writings, 1 and 2. Edited by Craig R. Thompson. Vol. 23 & 24. Collected Works of Erasmus. Toronto, Buffalo, London: University of Toronto Press, 1978. https://utorontopress.com/9781487520731/collected-works-of-erasmus. - Kuehn, Manfred. Taking Note, A blog on the nature of note-taking. December 2007 - December 2018. https://web.archive.org/web/20181224085859/http://takingnotenow.blogspot.com/ - Ahrens, Sönke. How to Take Smart Notes: One Simple Technique to Boost Writing, Learning and Thinking – for Students, Academics and Nonfiction Book Writers. Create Space, 2017. - Sertillanges, Antonin Gilbert, and Mary Ryan. The Intellectual Life: Its Spirit, Conditions, Methods. First English Edition, Fifth printing. 1921. Reprint, Westminster, MD: The Newman Press, 1960. http://archive.org/details/a.d.sertillangestheintellectuallife. - Webb, Beatrice Potter. Appendix C of My Apprenticeship. First Edition. New York: Longmans, Green & Co., 1926. - Schmidt, Johannes F. K. “Niklas Luhmann’s Card Index: The Fabrication of Serendipity.” Sociologica 12, no. 1 (July 26, 2018): 53–60. https://doi.org/10.6092/issn.1971-8853/8350. - Hollier, Denis. “Notes (On the Index Card).” October 112, no. Spring (2005): 35–44. - Wilken, Rowan. “The Card Index as Creativity Machine.” Culture Machine 11 (2010): 7–30. - Blair, Ann M. Too Much to Know: Managing Scholarly Information before the Modern Age. Yale University Press, 2010. https://yalebooks.yale.edu/book/9780300165395/too-much-know. - Krajewski, Markus. Paper Machines: About Cards & Catalogs, 1548-1929. Translated by Peter Krapp. History and Foundations of Information Science. MIT Press, 2011. https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/paper-machines. - Goutor, Jacques. The Card-File System of Note-Taking. Approaching Ontario’s Past 3. Toronto: Ontario Historical Society, 1980. http://archive.org/details/cardfilesystemof0000gout.

      And many, many others as I'm a student of intellectual history.... If you want to go spelunking on some of my public notes, perhaps this is an interesting place to start: https://hypothes.is/users/chrisaldrich?q=tag%3A%22note+taking%22 I also keep a reasonable public bibliography on this and related areas: https://www.zotero.org/groups/4676190/tools_for_thought

  14. Feb 2023
    1. reply to michaljjwilk (edited) Feb 18

      Some systems require a unique identifier, but the people who are using a datetime stamp or random number anywhere in their (Luhmann-esque) zettelkasten title (here's a good example) are leading you astray. […] The point of a zettelkasten is to provide one help in ordering and building their knowledge, not in ordering their notes by time created. —via chrisaldrich

      Nadrzędny cel robienia notatek metodą Zettelkasten jest organizacja wiedzy, a nie organizacja notatek, stąd potrzeba odpowiedniego systemu łączenia informacji, a nie poszczególnych notatek.

      (eng, for reply purpose only) btw, i do not see any way to annotate the annotation in hipothesis or any way to save someone's highlight or note.

      (edit) It is so annoying and tedious i can not view this comment in my profile. I understand social aspect of Hypothes.is (and needs for that), but it is hard to track your activity this way. And it is not intuitive to annotate someone's annotation. So i assume - Hypothes.is masters can correct me if i am wrong - the better way is copy someone's quote with a link to Hypothes.is and put it in the page note, but the problem is i view this annotation in separation of the source material, so i have to go to source (context) and there find what interests me and do my work. Some time to time maybe it is no problem, but i do not want to imagine how it feels in bigger scale. And i do not get why there is tagging option for replies if you can not search them in the main page…

      You've definitely come across a well known issue with respect to Hypothes.is: https://github.com/hypothesis/h/issues/7317 Feel free to comment on it to help it get some attention from developers.

      I pull most of my content into an Obsidian notebook, so I always include the URL for any individual page into at least one of my annotations. Then I can use the API to pull in all of my own annotations (including replies) using that.

      Alternately you might reply to someone's annotation and then cut/paste a version as a page note so that it's more easily searchable.

      Surely there are other potential workarounds, but it depends on what you need out of your practice.

    1. About this time I met with an odd volume of the Spectator.[18] It was the third. I had never before seen any of them. I bought it, read it over and over, and was much delighted with it. I thought the writing excellent, and wished, if possible, to imitate it. With this view I took some of the papers, and, making short hints of the sentiment in each sentence, laid them by a few days, and then, without looking at the book, try'd to compleat the papers again, by expressing each hinted sentiment at length, and as fully as it had been expressed before, in any suitable words that should come to hand. Then I compared my Spectator with the original, discovered some of my faults, and corrected them. But I found I wanted a stock of words, or a readiness in recollecting and using them, which I thought I should have acquired before that time if I had gone on making verses; since the continual occasion for words of the same import, but of different length, to suit the measure, or of different sound for the rhyme, would have laid me under a constant necessity of searching for variety, and also have tended to fix that variety in my mind, and make me master of it. Therefore I took some of the tales and turned them into verse; and, after a time, when I had pretty well forgotten the prose, turned them back again. I also sometimes jumbled my collections of hints into confusion, and after some weeks endeavored to reduce them into the best order, before I began to form the full sentences and compleat the paper. This was to teach me method in the arrangement of thoughts. By comparing my work afterwards with the original, I discovered many faults and amended them; but I sometimes had the pleasure of fancying that, in certain particulars of small import, I had been lucky enough to improve the method of the language, and this encouraged me to think I might possibly in time come to be a tolerable English writer, of which I was extremely ambitious. My time for these exercises and for reading was at night, after work or before it began in the morning, or on Sundays, when I contrived to be in the printing-house alone, evading as much as I could the common attendance on public worship which my father used to exact of me when I was under his care, and which indeed I still thought a duty, thought I could not, as it seemed to me, afford time to practise it.

      Even the greats copied or loosely plagiarized the "masters" to learn how to write.The key is to continually work at it until you get to the point where it's yours and it is no longer plagiarism.

      This was also the general premise behind the plotline of the movie Finding Forrester.

    1. Your access of the website and/or use of our services, after modification, addition or deletion of the privacy policy shall be deemed to constitute acceptance by you of the modification, addition or deletion.

      This sounds bad. Users can't be held to have agreed to arbitrary changes to a privacy policy, if we are not even notified about the changes.

      If you make significant changes to the privacy policy you should give users 30 days' notice, and preferably get their consent again.

      Here's an article about it: https://www.privacypolicies.com/blog/privacy-policy-update-notices/

  15. Jan 2023
    1. Meta-level referencing (addresses on linksthemselves) enables knowledge workers to commentupon links and otherwise reference them.
    1. Actually, using the hypothesis BOOKMARKLET is much more convinient than 'paste a link' or typing "via.hypothes.is/" in front of every link you want to annotate. With the bookmarklet all you need to do is, when you find a page that you want to bookmark, in the search bar of the mobile browser search for the name you saved the bookmarklet as and click it. It will immediately load hypothesis on the page just like clicking the hypothesis extention would do in pc. To bookmark the bookmarklet link (which can be found in https://web.hypothes.is/start) in the mobile browser, copy the link address of the bookmarklet link (which is a javascript code) and just edit an existing (useless) bookmark already there in the mobile browser replace the url with the bookmarklet link. Also give it a title (like "bookmarklet hypothesis") which you would type in the address bar of the mobile browser to find the bookmarklet bookmark.

      Manual to use hypothes.is in mobile Firefox

      via.hypothes.is does not work as they stopped providing an open proxy. It makes all URL forwarders and standalone apps on Android close to useless.

      The piece of advice provided here works, but it is highly unintuitive.

      The mechanics is this: 1. open a page where you want to add annotation 2. click on a bookmark as if you are opening a new page 3. since the bookmark is actually just a piece of javascript, it will simply load hypothes.is client 4. profit.

      To make it work in Firefox mobile, the instruction is this: 1. create a new arbitrary bookmark on some page. It will appear in the list of your bookmarks. 2. copy the bookmarklet javascript code. I was not able to do it directly in the FF mobile, so I copied it on my desktop and sent it to the phone via an IM 3. edit the newly created bookmark and a) give it a name, e.g., "hypothesize"; and b) replace the URL with the piece of copied javascript code 4. now when you want to add an annotation, follow the process above.

  16. Dec 2022
    1. simonhong commented Dec 11, 2020 @pitsi That homepage option is related with below homepage option. If homepage is configured, new tab will show that url. Loading local html file in new tab is not supported.

      I came here looking for a way to change the default New Tab Page in Brave to open up to my Hypothes.is bookmarks.

      This was passage was only part of the solution. The full solution is as follows: 1. Go to Settings > Appearances - brave://settings/appearance 2. Under "Show home button", select website you want to open as New Tab Page 3. Go to Settings > New Tab Page - brave://settings/newTab 4. Change from "Dashboard" to "Homepage"

    1. The program will create a new sheet with an archive of up to 200 annotations based on the search term

      200!

    1. Dr James Ravenscroft @jamesravey@fosstodon.orgFollowing on from my first week with hypothes.is I decided to integrate my annotations into #Joplin so that I have tighter integration of my literature + permanent notes. I've built a VERY alpha Joplin plugin that auto-imports hypothes.is annotations + tags to joplin by following your user atom feed https://brainsteam.co.uk/2022/12/04/joplin-hypothesis/ #PKM #ToolsForThought #hypothesis
  17. Nov 2022
    1. https://brainsteam.co.uk/2022/11/26/one-week-with-hypothesis/

      I too read a lot of niche papers and feel the emptiness, but because I'm most often writing for myself anyway, its alright. There are times, however, when I see a growing community of people who've left their associative trails behind before I've found a particular page.

      I've used the phrase "digital exhaust" before, but I like the more positive framing of "learning exhaust".

      If you've not found it yet, my own experimentations with the platform can largely be found here: https://boffosocko.com/tag/hypothes.is/

  18. learn-ap-southeast-2-prod-fleet01-xythos.content.blackboardcdn.com learn-ap-southeast-2-prod-fleet01-xythos.content.blackboardcdn.com
    1. Paste a Link

      Select menu > expand About Us > then select Paste a Link at the very bottom.

    2. Page for how to contribute to the Hypothes.is Project.<br /> - Code on GitHub - main repository: h - new feature ideas and current bugs: product-backlog - Chat in - Slack: anyone who wants to talk to contributors & community members, hang out, discuss project, get questions answered - Public forum: Less technical place for users to ask questions & discuss needs - Documentation - Using the Hypothesis API: enables you to create applications and services which read or write data from the Hypothesis service - Developing Hypothesis: set up development environment and contribute to Hypothes.is - Roadmap - High level view of features the dev team is evaluating, planning, & building

    3. One big feature that the Hypothes.is Notebook affords is indexing on replies (which currently aren't displayed on the Activity Page). I confirmed this on 2022-11-07 with one of Hypothes.is's support admins in their Slack channel.

      Sadly, this won't help my personal use case since I'm using the obsidian-hypothesis-plugin which seems to only pull highlights, annotations, and page notes from the Activity Page

      Consequently, I'll probably have to build something myself which will be somewhat painful but a good learning experience

    4. Is there a way to search for your replies to someone's public annotations?

      Currently, they don't show up when I search my user name and the tag I used in the reply. Is there an elegant way to search for these annotations and my reply to them?

    1. Testing if Google Chrome can make annotations on this Auto Hotkey documentation page.

      It (and Brave) can't make highlights or annotations for some reason. The prompt doesn't appear when text is highlighted, why is this? Is there a way to force the prompt to appear?

    1. Kevin Flowers Nov 7th at 12:50 PM# Question about repliesForgive me a bit if this is the wrong place to ask, but is the feature of having Hypothes.is list replies somewhere on the roadmap?  I checked the github issues with "label:enhancement" but nothing matches what I'm wondering aboutI could be missing something obvious, but when I search my username in https://hypothes.is/users, none of the replies I've made on other people's public annotations show up# Use casesSometimes people have insightful observations and references they provide, so I tend to reply to those annotations with tags that I use to sort through (eg, tags like "to read", "how to", "tutorial", and so forth)I also tend to make comments on what the OP's annotation made me think of at the time of reading it which is exemplified in the attached screenshotimage.png 9 repliesMichael DiRoberts  7 days ago@Kevin Flowers You’re right, the Activity Page (https://hypothes.is) doesn’t show replies. The Notebook, which will be built out more with time, does.https://web.hypothes.is/help/how-to-preview-the-hypothesis-notebook/HypothesisHow to Preview the Hypothesis Notebook : HypothesisHypothesis has released an early preview of Notebook, which enables you to view, search for, and filter annotations. While this tool is available in both the LMS and web apps, it is designed to bring much-needed functionality to our LMS users. This initial release contains some basic features we have planned to include in the […]Est. reading time2 minutes1Michael DiRoberts  7 days agoI hope Notebook solves the issue for you! For now it’s going to work on private groups and not the Public group (due to it having a limit of 5,000 annotations), though that may change in the future.Michael DiRoberts  7 days agoIf you’re comfortable using APIs then you might check out our API as well: https://h.readthedocs.io/en/latest/api-reference/v1/.You can find replies by looking at rows that contain references.Kevin Flowers  7 days agoOh, the Notebook seems like a neat tool, I'll have to share that with some friendsKevin Flowers  7 days agoThe issue for my own PKM (personal knowledge management) stack is that I couple Hypothes.is with an Obsidian [1] plugin that imports my annotations into my local file system.  Atm, I think the plugin only references the Activity Page to import annotations, so it looks like I'll have to play around with the API you mentioned if I want to grab my replies (along with their parent replies & annotations)[1] Obsidian is a notetaking software similar to Roam & Logseq; it just adds a pretty GUI on top of .md files which are stored locallyMichael DiRoberts  7 days agoNote that the Obsidian plugin wasn’t made by us, so I’m not familiar with how it works. It’s a little weird to me that it would work over the activity page and not use our API, however.Brian Cordan Young  7 days ago@Kevin Flowers Do you have, or have you considered, blogging about your use of Hypothesis as a part of a PKM?I’m still not a regular user of Hypothesis because it doesn’t fit in to my current info consumption well enough. That said I love learning how others do fit it in.(Obsidian is really great too) (edited) Kevin Flowers  7 days ago@Michael DiRoberts ah, you're right, thanks for mentioning that.   Looks like it requires one to generate an API token in order to pull highlights, so it must be using the Hypothes.is API in some way.  Sadly, I'm not familiar enough with general software development design (or JavaScript/TypeScript), and the source code for obsidian-hypothesis-plugin doesn't have enough high level comments for me to parse what any given file does.  It'll probably be cumbersome and somewhat painful, but I'll probably learn more by just building something from scratch@Brian Cordan Young Huh, I hadn't considered that until you mentioned it.   Recently developed some interest in building something with JavaScript (probably with the Next.js framework), so a blog might be just the project I've been looking forGitHubobsidian-hypothesis-plugin/src at master · weichenw/obsidian-hypothesis-pluginAn Obsidian.md plugin that syncs highlights from Hypothesis. - obsidian-hypothesis-plugin/src at master · weichenw/obsidian-hypothesis-plugin (150 kB)https://github.com/weichenw/obsidian-hypothesis-plugin/tree/master/srcMichael DiRoberts  7 days agoJust in case, or for others in the future, you can generate a Hypothesis API token here: https://hypothes.is/account/developer1

      This is a post I made on the Slack public channel asking about whether or not Hypothes.is indexes replies. A tech support membered confirmed this is true.

      However, Obsidian's Hypothes.is plugin does pull replies. It should be noted that default settings don't capture updates to the annotations or tags.

    1. the functional core, imperative shell pattern

      Link to video on "Boundaries" doesn't go into depth on the functional core, imperative shell pattern. However, this one does: https://www.destroyallsoftware.com/screencasts/catalog/functional-core-imperative-shell

    2. For new code, it’s usually a good idea to design the code so that it’s easy to test with “real” objects, rather than stubs or mocks.
    3. We keep our functional tests separate from our unit tests, in the tests/functional directory. Because these are slow to run, we will usually write one or two functional tests to check a new feature works in the common case, and unit tests for all the other cases.

      Keep functional & unit tests separate. Functional for common cases, unit for all others.

    4. To run the backend test suite only call tox directly

      Probably means, "Call tox directly if you only want to run the backend test suite."

    1. Now I can take an article from almost anywhere on my phone (reading services like Pocket, my feed readers, or even articles within the browser themselves), click share, choose “URL Forwarder” from the top of the list, select “Hypothesize” and the piece I want to annotate magically opens up with Hypothes.is ready to go in my default browser. Huzzah!

      Useful how-to for setting up Hypothes.is for mobile use on Android. Confirmed that this works on Brave mobile browser

    2. http:

      Using "https:" also works (at least with the Brave mobile browser on Android)

    1. You need to be in the triplescripts.org group to see this annotation.

      Membership is semi-private, but only as a consequence of current limitations of the Hypothes.is service.

      A copy of this annotation has been published in the Hypothes.is Public stream, which explains in detail that anyone is permitted to join.

  19. Oct 2022
    1. It is only too easy to misapply excerpted passages by taking them out of their original context. Ideally, I should have followed the technique, recommended as long ago as 1615 by the learned Jesuit Francesco Sacchini, of always making two sets of notes, one to be sliced up and filed, the other to be kept in its original form.

      Francesco Sacchini advised in 1615 that one should make two sets of notes: one to be cut up and filed, and the other kept in it's original form so as to keep the full context of the original author's context.


      This is broadly one of the values of note taking in Hypothes.is. One can take broader excerpts of an authors' works as well as maintain links for fuller context to reconsult, but still have the shorter excerpts as well as one's own notes.

    1. The firefox hypothes.is bookmarklet I use doesn’t seem to play nice with archive.org. There’s another I haven’t tested yet.

      I noticed the same thing. Does hypothes.is work with the Internet Archive in any scenario? I think it's a great tool and concept, but link rot limits it compared to saving pages and annotations locally (my preferred solution for that is Mark-It to turn a page into markdown or SingeFile to turn it into HTML and then adding highlights).

    1. Kei Annotations: 30 Joined: July 9, 2021 Location: San Francisco Link: glasp.co/

      https://hypothes.is/users/keisuke_w

      This seems to be one of the cofounders of Glasp. Obviously using Hypothes.is for competitive intelligence.

  20. Sep 2022
    1. @BenjaminVanDyneReplying to @ChrisAldrichI wish I had a good answer! The book I use when I teach is Joseph Harris’s “rewriting” which is technically a writing book but teaches well as a book about how to read in a writerly way.

      Thanks for this! I like the framing and general concept of the book.

      It seems like its a good follow on to Dan Allosso's OER text How to Make Notes and Write https://minnstate.pressbooks.pub/write/ or Sönke Ahrens' How to Take Smart Notes https://amzn.to/3DwJVMz which includes some useful psychology and mental health perspective.

      Other similar examples are Umberto Eco's How to Write a Thesis (MIT, 2015) or Gerald Weinberg's The Fieldstone Method https://amzn.to/3DCf6GA These may be some of what we're all missing.

      I'm reminded of Mark Robertson's (@calhistorian) discussion of modeling his note taking practice and output in his classroom using Roam Research. https://hyp.is/QuB5NDa0Ee28hUP7ExvFuw/thatsthenorm.com/mark-robertson-history-socratic-dialogue/ Perhaps we need more of this?

      Early examples of this sort of note taking can also be seen in the religious studies space with Melanchthon's handbook on commonplaces or Jonathan Edwards' Miscellanies, though missing are the process from notes to writings. https://www.logos.com/grow/jonathan-edwards-organizational-genius/

      Other examples of these practices in the wild include @andy_matuschak's https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DGcs4tyey18 and TheNonPoet's https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_sdp0jo2Fe4 Though it may be better for students to see this in areas in which they're interested.

      Hypothes.is as a potential means of modeling and allowing students to directly "see" this sort of work as it progresses using public/semi-public annotations may be helpful. Then one can separately model re-arranging them and writing a paper. https://web.hypothes.is/

      Reply to: https://twitter.com/BenjaminVanDyne/status/1571171086171095042

    1. 4 annotations of "GPT-3-ifying That Last Blogpost"

      This is cool. Something I should consider adding to my own sites. Just for the heck of it.

  21. Aug 2022
    1. https://www.reddit.com/r/antinet/comments/x2f4hn/should_i_always_create_a_bibnote/

      Here's a good example of my having written a response to something that only moments later disappeared thus roughly making my reply disappear and potentially be unfindable. Fortunately, Hypothes.is and my digital notes and content still remain, at least for me.

      Of course there was more context than my short highlight captured, but I still at least have the general gist.

    1. I am going to add some optional 'reading and doing' directions to my posts. Might be helpful.

      1. You might listen to the poem first.
      2. You might answer the question that Trethewey asks first. Maybe you can engage in the margins with it.
      3. You can make all or part of your responses public or private.
      4. You can start a group to consider the question.
      5. You can have at it in the order presented: my intro--> Twitter thread--> my response to the thread-->check out the link-->listen to the poem.
      6. Perch in the margins with the withered wild grapes and the black haw and the redbuds.
      7. Join in the work of forecasting your own life.
    1. we launched a service that’s now used by over a million people around the world who have made nearly 40 million annotations. In higher education, more than 1,200 colleges and universities use Hypothesis. And we’ve grown from a handful of people into a team of more than 35 passionate web builders.

      h. in 2022 has over 1 million users, who made nearly 40 million annotations. Early this year 2 million annotated articles/sites was reached (2175298 is the number the API rerurns today). This sounds like a lot but on its face works out to an average of 40 annotations on 2 articles per user. This suggests to me the mode is 1 annotation on 1 article per user. How many of those 1 million were active last week / month?

    1. "PDF is where documents go to die. Once something is in PDF, it's like a roach motel for data."

      —Chris Pratley, Microsoft Office's general manager (in TechRadar, 2012)

      obvious bias here on part of Pratley...

      Oddly, even if this were true, I'm not seeing patterns in the wild by which Microsoft products are helping to dramatically accelerate the distribution and easy ability to re-use data within documents. Perhaps its happening within companies or organizations to some extent, but it's not happening within the broader commons of the internet.


      If .pdfs are where information goes to die, then perhaps tools like Hypothes.is are meant to help resurrect that information?

    1. This is a living document. Ideas or feedback can be contributed through commenting directly using Hypothes.is which will create issues in the Github repo or you can directly create an issue: https://github.com/FAIRIslandProject/Generic-Place-based-Data-Policy/issues

      How awesome is this sort of integration? If one can use annotations to create issues within Github, it should be relatively easy for websites to do similar integrations to allow the use of Hypothes.is as a native commenting system on website pages. The API could be leveraged with appropriate URL wildcard patterns to do this.

      I have heard of a few cases of people using Github issue queues as comments sections for websites, and this dovetails well into that space.

      How might the Webmention spec be leveraged or abstracted to do similar sorts of communication work?

    1. Historical Hypermedia: An Alternative History of the Semantic Web and Web 2.0 and Implications for e-Research. .mp3. Berkeley School of Information Regents’ Lecture. UC Berkeley School of Information, 2010. https://archive.org/details/podcast_uc-berkeley-school-informat_historical-hypermedia-an-alte_1000088371512. archive.org.

      https://www.ischool.berkeley.edu/events/2010/historical-hypermedia-alternative-history-semantic-web-and-web-20-and-implications-e.

      https://www.ischool.berkeley.edu/sites/default/files/audio/2010-10-20-vandenheuvel_0.mp3

      headshot of Charles van den Heuvel

      Interface as Thing - book on Paul Otlet (not released, though he said he was working on it)

      • W. Boyd Rayward 1994 expert on Otlet
      • Otlet on annotation, visualization, of text
      • TBL married internet and hypertext (ideas have sex)
      • V. Bush As We May Think - crosslinks between microfilms, not in a computer context
      • Ted Nelson 1965, hypermedia

      t=540

      • Michael Buckland book about machine developed by Emanuel Goldberg antecedent to memex
      • Emanuel Goldberg and His Knowledge Machine: Information, Invention, and Political Forces (New Directions in Information Management) by Michael Buckland (Libraries Unlimited, (March 31, 2006)
      • Otlet and Goldsmith were precursors as well

      four figures in his research: - Patrick Gattis - biologist, architect, diagrams of knowledge, metaphorical use of architecture; classification - Paul Otlet, Brussels born - Wilhelm Ostwalt - nobel prize in chemistry - Otto Neurath, philosophher, designer of isotype

      Paul Otlet

      Otlet was interested in both the physical as well as the intangible aspects of the Mundaneum including as an idea, an institution, method, body of work, building, and as a network.<br /> (#t=1020)

      Early iPhone diagram?!?

      (roughly) armchair to do the things in the web of life (Nelson quote) (get full quote and source for use) (circa 19:30)

      compares Otlet to TBL


      Michael Buckland 1991 <s>internet of things</s> coinage - did I hear this correctly? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_of_things lists different coinages

      Turns out it was "information as thing"<br /> See: https://hypothes.is/a/kXIjaBaOEe2MEi8Fav6QsA


      sugane brierre and otlet<br /> "everything can be in a document"<br /> importance of evidence


      The idea of evidence implies a passiveness. For evidence to be useful then, one has to actively do something with it, use it for comparison or analysis with other facts, knowledge, or evidence for it to become useful.


      transformation of sound into writing<br /> movement of pieces at will to create a new combination of facts - combinatorial creativity idea here. (circa 27:30 and again at 29:00)<br /> not just efficiency but improvement and purification of humanity

      put things on system cards and put them into new orders<br /> breaking things down into smaller pieces, whether books or index cards....

      Otlet doesn't use the word interfaces, but makes these with language and annotations that existed at the time. (32:00)

      Otlet created diagrams and images to expand his ideas

      Otlet used octagonal index cards to create extra edges to connect them together by topic. This created more complex trees of knowledge beyond the four sides of standard index cards. (diagram referenced, but not contained in the lecture)

      Otlet is interested in the "materialization of knowledge": how to transfer idea into an object. (How does this related to mnemonic devices for daily use? How does it relate to broader material culture?)

      Otlet inspired by work of Herbert Spencer

      space an time are forms of thought, I hold myself that they are forms of things. (get full quote and source) from spencer influence of Plato's forms here?

      Otlet visualization of information (38:20)

      S. R. Ranganathan may have had these ideas about visualization too

      atomization of knowledge; atomist approach 19th century examples:S. R. Ranganathan, Wilson, Otlet, Richardson, (atomic notes are NOT new either...) (39:40)

      Otlet creates interfaces to the world - time with cyclic representation - space - moving cube along time and space axes as well as levels of detail - comparison to Ted Nelson and zoomable screens even though Ted Nelson didn't have screens, but simulated them in paper - globes

      Katie Berner - semantic web; claims that reporting a scholarly result won't be a paper, but a nugget of information that links to other portions of the network of knowledge.<br /> (so not just one's own system, but the global commons system)

      Mention of Open Annotation (Consortium) Collaboration:<br /> - Jane Hunter, University of Australia Brisbane & Queensland<br /> - Tim Cole, University of Urbana Champaign<br /> - Herbert Van de Sompel, Los Alamos National Laboratory annotations of various media<br /> see:<br /> - https://www.researchgate.net/publication/311366469_The_Open_Annotation_Collaboration_A_Data_Model_to_Support_Sharing_and_Interoperability_of_Scholarly_Annotations - http://www.openannotation.org/spec/core/20130205/index.html - http://www.openannotation.org/PhaseIII_Team.html

      trust must be put into the system for it to work

      coloration of the provenance of links goes back to Otlet (~52:00)

      Creativity is the friction of the attention space at the moments when the structural blocks are grinding against one another the hardest. —Randall Collins (1998) The sociology of philosophers. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press (p.76)

    1. Half the time I begin typing something, I'm not even sure what I'm writing yet. Writing it out is an essential part of thinking it out. Once I've captured it, re-read it, and probably rewritten it, I can then worry about what to label it, what it connects to, and where it should 'live' in my system.

      One of my favorite things about Hypothes.is is that with a quick click, I've got a space to write and type and my thinking is off to the races.

      Sometimes it's tacitly (linked) attached to another idea I've just read (as it is in this case), while other times it's not. Either way, it's coming out and has at least a temporary place to live.

      Later on, my note is transported (via API) from Hypothes.is to my system where I can figure out how to modify it or attach it to something else.

      This one click facility is dramatically important in reducing the friction of the work for me. I hate systems which require me to leave what I'm doing and opening up another app, tool, or interface to begin.

  22. Jul 2022
    1. For those curious about the idea of what students might do with the notes and annotations they're making in the margins of their texts using Hypothes.is, I would submit that Dan Allosso's OER handbook How to Make Notes and Write (Minnesota State Pressbooks, 2022) may be a very useful place to turn. https://minnstate.pressbooks.pub/write/

      It provides some concrete advice on the topic of once you've highlighted and annotated various texts for a course, how might you then turn your new understanding, ideas, and extant thinking work into a blogpost, essay, term paper or thesis.

      For a similar, but alternative take, the book How to Take Smart Notes: One Simple Technique to Boost Writing, Learning and Thinking by Sönke Ahrens (Create Space, 2017) may also be helpful as well. This text however requires purchase via Amazon and doesn't carry the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial ShareAlike (by-nc-sa 4.0) license that Dr. Allosso's does.

      In addition to the online copy of the book, there's an annotatable .pdf copy available here: http://docdrop.org/pdf/How-to-Make-Notes-and-Write---Allosso-Dan-jzdq8.pdf/ though one can download .epub and .pdf copies directly from the Pressbooks site.

    1. As marginal note-taking it often is the basis for questions asked in class discussion or points made in a final paper.

      Jeremy Dean indicates that marginal notes are often "the basis for [...] points made in a final paper", but I wonder how frequently this is the case in the computer era? I rarely see or hear of educators encouraging the reuse of marginalia or even notes in academic settings, even within the framing of Hypothes.is which is an ideal tool for such a practice.

      It's been my experience that while notes are in margins, they tend to sit there lonely and unused. Few are actually creating content based on them. When this is the case, memory of the idea or issue at hand is necessary so that it may be looked up and transcribed back into a bigger piece. When it does happen it's also far more likely to be academic writers or researchers who are concertedly building up particular areas. It's much less likely to be high school or undergraduate college students who should have picked up the practice earlier in junior high school or even elementary school so that their school research years are easier.

      A potential resurgence of this broader practice may be coming back into vogue with the slew of new note taking apps that have been popping up and the idea of the zettelkasten coming back into a broader consciousness.

    1. // NB: Since line terminators can be the multibyte CRLF sequence, care // must be taken to ensure we work for calls where `tokenPosition` is some // start minus 1, where that "start" is some line start itself.

      I think this satisfies the threshold of "minimum viable publication". So write this up and reference it here.

      Full impl.:

      getLineStart(tokenPosition, anteTerminators = null) {
        if (tokenPosition > this._edge && tokenPosition != this.length) {
          throw new Error("random access too far out"); // XXX
        }
      
        // NB: Since line terminators can be the multibyte CRLF sequence, care
        // must be taken to ensure we work for calls where `tokenPosition` is some
        // start minus 1, where that "start" is some line start itself.
        for (let i = this._lineTerminators.length - 1; i >= 0; --i) {
          let current = this._lineTerminators[i];
          if (tokenPosition >= current.position + current.content.length) {
            if (anteTerminators) {
              anteTerminators.push(...this._lineTerminators.slice(0, i));
            }
            return current.position + current.content.length;
          }
        }
      
        return 0;
      }
      

      (Inlined for posterity, since this comes from an uncommitted working directory.)

  23. Jun 2022
    1. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1N4LYLwa2lSq9BizDaJDimOsWY83UMFqqQc1iL2KEpfY/edit

      P.R.O.B.E. rubric participation (exceeds, meets fails), respectful, open, brave, educational

      Mentioned in the chat at Hypothes.is' SOCIAL LEARNING SUMMIT: Spotlight on Social Reading & Social Annotation

      in the session on Bringing the Margins to Center: Introduction to Social Annotation


      Looking at the idea of rubrication, I feel like I ought to build a Tampermonkey or Greasemonkey script that takes initial capitals on paragraphs and makes them large, red, or even illuminated. Or perhaps something that converts the CSS of Hypothes.is and makes it red instead of yellow?

      What if we had a collection of illuminated initials and some code that would allow for replacing capitals at the start of paragraphs? Maybe a repository like giphy or some of the meme and photo collections for reuse?

    1. I very much appreciate your commitment to growth and learning. I also think it's nice to have colorful posts here vs. a ghost town. My feedback would be to gear your posts towards how to use an Antinet to produce written output. Specifically what main note you created, with pictures of the main note, and then elaborate on what they actually mean, and share a written post about the idea. You've done several of these posts, and I'd say lean even more towards sharing the most powerful thought/the most powerful maincard you've developed all week. For frequency, I'd say one post a week on this would be great.My main point is this: the primary use of Luhmann's Antinet was written output. The thoughts he shared were deep and developed because of the Antinet process. We're not in the PKM space, we're in the AKD space. Analog Knowledge Development, focusing on written output. The paradox is, when changing your mindset to written output, you actually become more of a learning machine.

      One of the toughest parts about these systems is that while they're relatively easy to outline (evidence: the thousands of 500-1000 word blog posts about zettelkasten in the last 3 years), they're tougher to practice and many people have slight variations on the idea (from Eminem's "Stacking Ammo" to Luhmann's (still incomplete) digital collection). Far fewer people are sticking with it beyond a few weeks or doing it for crazy reasons (I call it #ProductivityPorn, while Scott has the colorful phrase "bubble graph boys").

      For those who visit here, seeing discrete cards and ideas, videos, or examples of how others have done this practice can be immensely helpful. While it can be boring to watch a video of someone reading and taking notes by hand, it can also be incredibly useful to see exactly what they're doing and how they're doing it (though God bless you for speeding them up 😅).

      This is also part of why I share examples of how others have practiced these techniques too. Seeing discrete examples to imitate is far easier than trying to innovate your way into these methods, particularly when it's difficult to see the acceleration effects of serendipity that comes several months or years into the process. Plus it's fun to see how Vladimir Nabokov, Anne Lamott, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Bob Hope, Michael Ende, Twyla Tharp, Roland Barthes, Kate Grenville, Marcel Mauss, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Joan Rivers, Umberto Eco, Georg Christoph Lichtenberg, Raymond, Llull, George Carlin, John Locke, and Eminem all did variations of this for themselves. (This last sentence has so much entropy in it, I'm certain that it's never been written before in the history of humanity.)

      And isn't everyone tired to death of Luhmann, Luhmann, Luhmann? You'd think that no one had ever thought to take note of anything before?!

      While my own approach is a hybrid of online and offline techniques, I've gotten long emails from people following my Hypothes.is feed of notes and annotations saying what a useful extended example it is. Of course they don't see the follow up that entails revision of the notes or additional linking, tagging, and indexing that may go on, but it's at least enough of an idea that they understand the start of the practice.

      (Incidentally, I wrote most of this using a few cards from my own system. 🗃️✂️🖋️)

    1. By asking students to share their annotations openly, we help students to see a wide range of annotation practices, thus demystifying what has often been a private, individual practice.

      Teachers can model their own reading and annotating practices for students, but this can be expanded when using social annotation. This will allow students to show each other a wider variety of potential note taking and annotation strategies which help to reinforce the teacher's own modeling. This can be useful modelling of a practice in public which has historically been done privately.

      By featuring notes which might be reused for papers or developing later research, teachers can also feature the portions of the note taking process which can be reused for developing new ideas. How might annotations within a text be linked to each other outside of the particular flow of the paper? Might there have been different orderings for the arguments that may have been clearer?

      What ideas in the broader class might the ideas within a particular text be linked to? What ideas outside of the class can be linked to those found within the text?

      In less experienced groups, teachers might occasionally call out individual annotations in discussion to ask the group for what purposes a student might have annotated specific portions to highlight the various methods and reasons.

      What are the list of particular note types here? - Paraphrasing segments to self-test for understanding - Creation of spaced repetition type notes for memorizing definitions and facts - Conversations with the text/original author and expansion of the ideas - Questioning the original text, do we agree/disagree? - Linking ideas from the text into one's broader knowledge base - Highlighting quotes for later reuse - others??


      Link to - double-entry journaling in Bruce Ballenger<br /> - types of questions one might ask within a text, Ballenger again

    2. there is clear evidence that explicitly teaching reading strategies to students improves their overall academic performance, such instruction is often limited to developmental reading or study skills courses (Saxby 2017, 37-38).

      Teaching reading strategies to students improves their overall academic performance, but this instruction is often limited to developmental reading or study skills courses.

      ref: Saxby, Lori Eggers. “Efficacy of a College Reading Strategy Course: Comparative Study.” Journal of Developmental Education 40, no. 3 (2017): 36-38.

      Using Hypothes.is as a tool in a variety of courses can help to teach reading strategies and thereby improve students' overall academic performance.

    1. Some digital notes apps allow you to displayonly the images saved in your notes, which is a powerful way ofactivating the more intuitive, visual parts of your brain.

      Visual cues one can make in their notes and user interfaces that help to focus or center on these can be useful reminders for what appears in particular notes, especially if visual search is a possibility.

      Is this the reason that Gyuri Lajos very frequently cuts and pastes images into his Hypothes.is notes?

      Which note taking applications leverage this sort of visual mnemonic device? Evernote did certainly, but other text heavy tools like Obsidian, Logseq, and Roam Research don't. Most feed readers do this well leveraging either featured photos, photos in posts, or photos in OGP.

    1. You can use click on the < button in the top-right of your browser window to read and write comments on this post with Hypothesis. You can read more about how I use this software here.

      Spencer's example of user interface below his posts to indicate how readers might comment on his website.