13 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2023
  2. Dec 2022
    1. In advance of deleting my Twitter account, I made this web page that lets you search my tweets, link to an archived version, and read whole threads I wrote.https://tinysubversions.com/twitter-archive/I will eventually release this as a website I host where you drop your Twitter zip archive in and it spits out the 100% static site you see here. Then you can just upload it somewhere and you have an archive that is also easy to style how you like it.

      https://friend.camp/@darius/109521972924049369

    1. DanAllosso · 36 min. agoThanks, Scott! I'll have a Scrintal "board" with photographed analog notes to show soon, too. Solved the fire and flood problem.
    2. ephemeral sources .t3_znbvw3._2FCtq-QzlfuN-SwVMUZMM3 { --postTitle-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postTitleLink-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postBodyLink-VisitedLinkColor: #989898; }

      reply to: https://www.reddit.com/r/antinet/comments/znbvw3/ephemeral_sources/

      If it makes you feel better, this is a long standing problem of document and source loss. As just a small historical example from a fellow, but very early, note taker and practitioner of the ars excerpendi (art of excerpting):

      Presumed to have been written in the fifth century Stobaeus compiled an extensive two volume manuscript commonly known as The Anthologies of excerpts containing 1,430 poetry and prose quotations of classical ancient works from Greece and Rome of which only 315 original sources are still extant in the 21st century.[1] Large portions of our knowledge of many famous classical texts and plays are the result of his notes. Perhaps your notes will one day serve as the only references to famous documents of our time?

      Often for digital copies of things, I'll use a browser bookmarklet to quickly save archive copies of pages to the Internet Archive as I'm excerpting or annotating them. See https://help.archive.org/help/save-pages-in-the-wayback-machine/ for some ways of doing this.


      [1] Moller, Violet. The Map of Knowledge: A Thousand-Year History of How Classical Ideas Were Lost and Found. 1st ed. New York: Doubleday, 2019. https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/546484/the-map-of-knowledge-by-violet-moller/.

  3. Feb 2022
  4. Nov 2021
  5. Oct 2020
    1. every page on my blog contains a link to its archive in the page footer. This ensures that you can not only browse the latest version of all of my blog articles in case of a server breakdown. This also enables you to browse all previous version, probably changed over time. Go ahead, try a few "Archive" links of my articles. If any of my articles start with an "Updates:" section, you know for sure that there are older versions accessible via the Internet Archive.

      This is an interesting pattern. How could one make this more obvious from a uI perspective?

    1. we are ending the HuffPost contributor platform

      Just another site-death...

      Ben Walsh of the LA Times Data Desk has created a simple web interface at www.SaveMy.News that journalists can use to archive their stories to The Internet Archive and WebCite. One can log into the service via Twitter and later download a .csv file with a running list of all their works with links to the archived copies.

  6. Mar 2019
    1. The fact is, though, it is often genuinely difficult for users without a decent amount of technical experience to find the right balance. Many systems don’t make it easy to find, organize and back up valuable files, while shunting more ephemeral data to the digital trash heap. Social networking sites are notoriously difficult to search, let alone download content from. Cloud services shut down or change policies often with little notice, said the Archive Team’s Jason Scott, like Tumblr’s about-face on erotic pictures, Google’s move to shut down social network Google+ or the venerable photo-sharing site Flickr’s recent announcement it would begin purging images from legacy free accounts with more than 1,000 pictures uploaded as of March 12.
  7. Jan 2019
    1. Isaacson pointed out that more than 7,000 pages from Da Vinci’s notebooks survived to today–a stretch of 500 years. He asked how many of our tweets and Facebook posts will survive even 50 years. Paper, it turns out, is a durable medium of information storage.