19 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2022
  2. Jun 2022
    1. Curator’s Perspective
    2. If you feel resistance to continuing with this project later, tryDialing Down the Scope.

      Another example of [[self-important capitalization]] here. ugh...

      This is possibly a better name for it...

    3. allyou’re doing is drawing on a growing library of Intermediate Packetsstored in your Second Brain.

      Intermediate Packets juxtaposed with Second Brain, it would have been better if he could have given a better analogy than intermediate packets to create some parallelism with Second Brain, alas... lack of creativity?

      Notice the importance he's giving to Intermediate Packets by artificially capitalizing it. An indication of attempt to commoditize and sell "note taking" as a product.

      link to https://hyp.is/OKlVhPBCEeyX96cojNH8rg/www.danah.org/name.html

    1. So, i started researching where the capitalization of said pronoun came from and was quite stunned to find that it was always capitalized because it always appeared as the first word in a sentence, never stuck in the middle. And then, when it started appearing in the middle, it started getting capitalized out of convention and because people worried that it would get lost in script. Of course, "It's odd, and a little unsettling, to reflect upon the fact that English is the only major language in which "I" is capitalized; in many other languages "You" is capitalized and the "i" is lower case" (journalist Sydney J. Harris).

      If it's true that English is the only major language in which "I" is capitalized instead of the more commonly capitalized "you", does this help to underline some of the self-centeredness show by most of the English speaking West?

    2. I was always bothered by the fact that the first person singular pronoun is capitalized in english - i always thought it was quite self-righteous.
    3. Douglas Adams noted, "Capital letters were always the best way of dealing with things you didn't have a good answer to."

      from Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency

  3. Mar 2022
    1. Capitalization conveys a certain distinction, the elevated position of humans and their creations in the hierarchy of beings. Biologists have widely adopted the convention of not capital-izing the common names of plants and animals unless they include the name of a human being or an official place name. Thus, the first blossoms of the spring woods are written as bloodroot and the pink star of a California woodland is Kellogg’s tiger lily. This seemingly trivial grammatical rulemaking in fact expresses deeply held assump-tions about human exceptionalism, that we are somehow different and indeed better than the other species who surround us. Indigenous ways of understanding recognize the personhood of all beings as equally important, not in a hierarchy but a circle.

      Rules for capitalization in English give humans elevated hierarchical positions over animals, plants, insects, and other living things. We should revise this thinking and capitalize words like Maple, Heron, and Mosquito when we talking of beings and only use only use the lower case when referring to broad categories or concepts like maples, herons, and humans.

  4. Nov 2021
  5. Jul 2021
    1. Myself as the Thief.

      Why "Myself" and "Thief" are capitalized in here? To emphasize? Or treated them as characters?

    2. JUNE, ’FORTY-NINE. EXPECT NEWS OF THE INDIANS, TOWARDS THE END OF THE MONTH.

      Capitalization in here referred to emphasize?

    3. Persons and Things

      Capitalized "Persons" and "Things" might refers to the specific ones

  6. Mar 2018
    1. Immortal.

      Here, "Immortal" is capitalized and used as a noun, where as in the next line it is not capitalized and used as an adjective.