23 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. The couple knew firsthand of Edmund Wilson’s travails with “Memoirs of Hecate County,” a story collection that was withdrawn from sale and prosecuted for obscenity, in 1946. Wilson’s case had made its way to the Supreme Court, which upheld the ban.
  2. Jul 2024
    1. Adler, Mortimer J., and Charles Van Doren. How to Read a Book: The Classical Guide to Intelligent Reading. Revised and Updated edition. 1940. Reprint, Touchstone, 2011.

      Edmund Gröpl's concept map of Adler & Van Doren's How to Read a Book via https://forum.zettelkasten.de/discussion/comment/20668#Comment_20668:

  3. Mar 2024
  4. Dec 2023
  5. Nov 2023
    1. Today, the U.S. is spending hundreds of millions to address the crisis of methane emissions. But as Tony Ingraffea says, this should have happened a decade ago (https://lnkd.in/eaFpkTrj) and it didn't because of a single person.And none of this is in the past. Ernest Moniz is the single person in the entire world most responsible for legitimizing the hoax of #carboncapture. And carbon capture is only reason that the global oil&gas cartel has been given a green light to #drilldrilldrill.These lies matter, and they are devastating our world
      • for: big oil cover up, big oil - MIT, big Oil Ernest Moniz, methane emissions coverup, PBS - The Power of Big Oil, climate change - big oil lobby, quote - Ernest Moniz, quote Edmund Carlevale, quote - methane emissions coverup

      • quote

        • Today, the U.S. is spending hundreds of millions to address the crisis of methane emissions. But as Tony Ingraffea says, this should have happened a decade ago (https://lnkd.in/eaFpkTrj) and it didn't because of a single person.
        • And none of this is in the past. Ernest Moniz is the single person in the entire world most responsible for legitimizing the hoax of #carboncapture.
        • And carbon capture is only reason that the global oil&gas cartel has been given a green light to #drilldrilldrill. -These lies matter, and they are devastating our world.
      • author: Edmund Carlevale
      • date: Nov 16, 2023

      • reference

  6. Sep 2023
    1. a transcendental is something that is, or not a thing, of course, but it's very well known and it has been well known for a very long time.
      • for: Kant's transcendental - in history, quote, quote - Upanishad, quote - Ernst Cassirer, quote - Michel Henry, quote - Giovanni Gentile, quote Edmund Husserl

      • paraphrase

        • The transcendental cannot be an objective thought but is the condition for any objective thought
        • Brihadaranyaka Upanishad
          • Kant's transcendental is equivalent to the Braham
            • it is never seen but is a seer
            • it is never heard but is a hearer
            • it is never thought but is the thinker
            • it is never known but is the knower
            • it is the source of things and the source of knowledge
        • Ernst Cassirer
          • Consciousness is a goal to which knowledge turns its back
        • Michel Henry Consciousness cannot be shown, for it is the power to show.
        • Giovanni Gentile
        • Edmund Husserl
          • transcendental turn
            • the world is a sense for the transcendental ego
            • the transcendental ego is presupposed by the senses
    2. From the very beginning, his work has been guided by what Edmund Husserl called the mothers of knowledge. Namely, the dynamics of lived embodied experience,
      • for: Edmund Husserl, the Mother of Knowledge, nondual, nonduality, non-dual, non-duality, the ground of existence
      • definition: the mother of knowledge
        • the dynamics of lived embodied experience
      • author: Edmond Husserl
  7. Jul 2023
    1. In a letter to the Times Book Review in November, 1971, Nabokov wrote, “I am aware that my former friend is in poor health but in the struggle between the dictates of compassion and those of personal honor the latter wins.”
  8. Jan 2023
    1. In our real world of corrupted, minimalist democracy, we privilege individual, special-interest thinking and ask citizens to do no more than express their private preferences. We confound opinion and knowledge and sometimes even seem to think that by denying expert science we honor “democratic” thinking (as if shared ignorance and democracy were the same thing). In this corrupted version of democracy, “now” trumps “later,” today takes precedence over tomorrow, and no one takes responsibility for that greater democracy about which Edmund Burke spoke—the democracy that encompasses not only the interests of the living, but the interests of those who are gone and those as yet unborn. Generational thinking can only be cultivated in a setting of prudent deliberation; contrarily, our short-term present-mindedness shrinks the temporal zone.

      !- claim : we live in a corrupted and minimalist democracy with the consequence that we lack generational thinking - privilege individiual, special-interesting thinking - only ask citizens to express their private preferences - confound opinion and knowledge - we even deny expert science, believing it is tantamout to democratic thinking !- claim : within this minimalist, corrupted version of democracy, present thinking trumps future thinking - we do not apply generational thinking aka Edmund Burke - Burke's idea of generational thinking conceptualizes an ideal democracy that encompasses past, present and future generations - generational thinking requires a space of prudent deliberation rather than present-mind thinking only

  9. Dec 2022
    1. Today my Zettelkasten is 8 month old. When I started note-taking in March 2022, I didn‘t expect a number of nearly 1000 notes in such a short time.

      https://hessen.social/@groepl/109456367157130265

  10. Oct 2022
  11. Aug 2022
  12. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. I think it rather unnecessary in you to be advising me

      This reminds me of Tom Bertram, the elder brother, responding to concern from his younger brother about the proposed amateur theatricals at Mansfield Park. "Manage your own concerns, Edmund, and I’ll take care of the rest of the family" (MP chapter 13). It feels very much like "I'm the older sibling, I know what I'm doing"

  13. Jul 2022
    1. That is to say, he must live in a universewhere the sequences of events are such that his unconventional communicational habits will bein some sense appropriate.

      The analysis of pathological psychological conditions such as schizophrenia may benefit from framing them within Husserl's Lebenswelt concept of lifeworld.

    1. Consequently, theshape of the gridlock [9], in which further progression towards an ever-greater executive capacity givento a selected group of institutions has become nearly impossible, is not an anomaly to be overcome.The gridlock is the only configuration in which the global system could have settled. It isthe configuration any system is bound to adopt when it is composed of a multitude of differentlypositioned, differently oriented, heterogeneous decision-makers, operating in different dimensionsand scales, none of which universally dominant and all are co-dependent and constrained by others.

      !- question : governance gridlock of disparate actors

    1. a huge comet (possibly the one seen in 1680) falls into the sun, causing it to flareup and incinerate the planets

      Comets in the 1680's were thought to be planet sized and not their current known size.

      Edmund Halley gave a paper in the 1690's about a comet hitting the Earth. He posited that that event was the cause of the tilt of the axis of the Earth.

  14. bafybeicyqgzvzf7g3zprvxebvbh6b4zpti5i2m2flbh4eavtpugiffo5re.ipfs.dweb.link bafybeicyqgzvzf7g3zprvxebvbh6b4zpti5i2m2flbh4eavtpugiffo5re.ipfs.dweb.link
    1. The Life We Live and the Life We Experience: Introducing theEpistemological Difference between “Lifeworld” (Lebenswelt) and “LifeConditions” (Lebenslage)
      • Title:The Life We Live and the Life We Experience: Introducing the Epistemological Difference between “Lifeworld” (Lebenswelt) and “Life Conditions” (Lebenslage)
      • Author: Bjorn Kraus
      • Date: 2015
      • Source: https://d-nb.info/1080338144/34
      • Annotation status: incomplete
    2. Eventhough the lifeworld term is not precisely defined, neither by Husserl nor by Schütz (seeFelten, 2000, p. 75; Bergmann, 1981, p. 50ff.; Welter, 1986, p. 77, 170), the relevance of thesubjective perspective can be identified as a crucial characteristic. Coming from aphenomenological perspective, lifeworld is regarded as the result of a subjective appropriationof the world. This process is based on previous experiences as well as on the usage ofindividual mental and physical characteristics. Accordingly, the phenomenological alignmentto the lifeworld implies much more than a simple orientation towards a person’s life situation.Speaking phenomenologically, not only differences in the life conditions have to beconsidered, but also differences in the individual’s perceptual conditions (Hitzler, 1999, S.232)4.

      !- gloss : lebenswelt * even though Husserl does not properly define lebenswelt (lifeworld), the subjective perspective is identified as crucial. * lifeworld is regarded as the result of a subjective appropriation of the world.

  15. May 2022
  16. Apr 2022
    1. it is valuable to turnto the work of Bernard Stiegler, and specifically to his idea of‘tertiary memory’. Stiegler develops this concept of tertiary memorythrough a reading of Husserl, and proposes it as a supplement (andcorrective) to Husserl’s understanding of primary and secondaryretention.

      These two should be interesting to read on memory and how they delineate its various layers.

      See: Stiegler, B. (2009) Technics and Time, 2: Disorientation. Trans. S. Barker. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

  17. Dec 2019
    1. wonderful and sublime

      The sublime is a notion in aesthetic and literary theory of striking grandeur of thought and emotion. The most important English work on the sublime is Edmund Burke's Philosophical Inquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful and Immanuel Kant's Critique of Judgement, which influenced nineteenth-century English thought.

  18. Apr 2018
    1. Edmund Burke

      Edmund Burke was a British statesman, political thinker, and Parliamentary orator who was active in the major political issues occurring in Britain in 1785. He was part of the controversy between King George III and Parliament, who, he believed, were attempting to exert too much control over the executive. He argued that though the king's actions did not legally defy the constitution, they went against the constitution in spirit. Similarly, during the American imperial crisis, Burke argued that the British government's treatment of the colonies followed the letter of the law, but lacked consistency and respect for the colonies' claims.

      As a Whig Parliamentarian, Burke supported Americans grievances against Great Britain, especially in the area of taxation. However, he criticized the French Revolution for being destructive to society.

  19. Feb 2014
    1. In the eighteenth century, Edmund Burke argued that property stabilized society and prevented political and social turmoil that, he believed, would result from a purely meritocratic order. n8 Property served as a counterweight protecting the class of persons who possessed it against competition from nonpropertied people of natural ability and talent. To Burke, the French National Assembly -- dominated by upstart lawyers from the provinces -- exemplified the risk of disorder and inexperience of an unpropertied leadership. n9 In contrast, the British parliament, a proper mix of talented commoners and propertied Lords, ruled successfully.