411 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Simões, Luciana G., Rita Peyroteo-Stjerna, Grégor Marchand, Carolina Bernhardsson, Amélie Vialet, Darshan Chetty, Erkin Alaçamlı, et al. “Genomic Ancestry and Social Dynamics of the Last Hunter-Gatherers of Atlantic France.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 121, no. 10 (March 5, 2024): e2310545121. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2310545121.

      saw via article:<br /> Europe's last hunter-gatherers avoided inbreeding by [[Dario Radley]]

  2. Apr 2024
  3. Mar 2024
    1. Sam Harnett’s 2020 paper “Words Matter: How Tech Media Helped Write Gig Companies Into Existence” remains one of the best accounts of how swaths of the media enthusiastically generated on-demand propaganda for the tech industry, directly setting the stage for these firms to exploit, codify, and expand legal loopholes that largely exempted them from regulation as they raided their users for data and generated billions in revenue. Such intellectual acquiescence would, as Harnett writes, “pave the way for a handful of companies that represent a tiny fraction of the economy to have an outsized impact on law, mainstream corporate practices, and the way we think about work.”

      Harnett, Sam. “Words Matter: How Tech Media Helped Write Gig Companies into Existence.” SSRN Scholarly Paper. Rochester, NY, August 7, 2020. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3668606.

  4. Feb 2024
  5. Jan 2024
  6. Dec 2023
  7. Nov 2023
    1. "Obra académica de Don Pablo"

      Pablo Cabañas Díaz

      Gaceta Políticas (FCPyS – UNAM)

      2023, febrero

      Cabañas Díaz, Pablo Alejandro, Obra académica de Don Pablo, Gaceta Políticas, Facultad de Ciencias Políticas y Sociales, núm. 293, febrero de 2023, pp. 8-11.

      CV de Pablo Cabañas Díaz: https://www.politicas.unam.mx/cedulas/ordinario/profesores/prof073516.pdf

      accessed:: 2023-11-13 21:10

    1. Cut/Copy/Paste explores the relations between fragments, history, books, and media. It does so by scouting out fringe maker cultures of the seventeenth century, where archives were cut up, “hacked,” and reassembled into new media machines: the Concordance Room at Little Gidding in the 1630s and 1640s, where Mary Collett Ferrar and her family sliced apart printed Bibles and pasted the pieces back together into elaborate collages known as “Harmonies”; the domestic printing atelier of Edward Benlowes, a gentleman poet and Royalist who rode out the Civil Wars by assembling boutique books of poetry; and the nomadic collections of John Bagford, a shoemaker-turned-bookseller who foraged fragments of old manuscripts and title pages from used bookshops to assemble a material history of the book. Working across a century of upheaval, when England was reconsidering its religion and governance, each of these individuals saved the frail, fragile, frangible bits of the past and made from them new constellations of meaning. These fragmented assemblages resist familiar bibliographic and literary categories, slipping between the cracks of disciplines; later institutions like the British Library did not know how to collate or catalogue them, shuffling them between departments of print and manuscript. Yet, brought back together in this hybrid history, their scattered remains witness an emergent early modern poetics of care and curation, grounded in communities of practice. Stitching together new work in book history and media archaeology via digital methods and feminist historiography, Cut/Copy/Paste traces the lives and afterlives of these communities, from their origins in early modern print cultures to the circulation of their work as digital fragments today. In doing so, this project rediscovers the odd book histories of the seventeenth century as a media history with an ethics of material making—one that has much to teach us today.
    1. original recordings of the theorists at that 1966 structuralism conference.“For years, everyone had said ‘there’s got to be recordings of those lectures.’ Well, we finally found the recordings of those lectures. They were hidden in a cabinet behind a bookshelf behind a couch,” said Liz Mengel, associate director of collections and academic services for the Sheridan Libraries at Johns Hopkins.

      Have these been transferred? Can we get them?

  8. Aug 2023
    1. Wardrip-Fruin, Noah, and Nick Montfort, eds. The New Media Reader. MIT Press, 2002. https://mitpress.mit.edu/9780262232272/the-new-media-reader/.

      Detlef Stern (@t73fde@mastodon.social) (accessed:: 2023-08-23 12:55:47)

      Eines der wunderbarsten Bücher, die ich in letzter Zeit studierte: "The New Media Reader". Sowohl inhaltlich (grundlegende Texte von 1940-1994, Borges, Bush, Turing, Nelson, Kay, Goldberg, Engelbart, ... Berners-Lee), als auch von der Liebe zum herausgeberischem Detail (papierne Links, Druckqualität, ...). Nicht nur für #pkm und #zettelkasten Fanatiker ein Muss. Man sieht gut, welchen Weg wir mit Computern noch vor uns haben. https://mitpress.mit.edu/9780262232272/the-new-media-reader/

  9. Jul 2023
  10. Jun 2023
  11. May 2023
    1. https://pressbooks.pub/illuminated/

      A booklet prepared for teachers that introduces key concepts from the Science of Learning (i.e. cognitive neuroscience). The digital booklet is the result of a European project. Its content have been compiled from continuing professional development workshops for teachers and features evidence-based teaching practices that align with our knowledge of the Science of Learning.

  12. Apr 2023
    1. Want to read: How Romantics and Victorians Organized Information by Jillian M. Hess 📚

      https://kimberlyhirsh.com/2023/04/28/want-to-read.html

      👀 How did I not see this?!?? 😍 Looks like a good follow up to Ann Blair's Too Much to Know (Yale, 2010) and the aperitif of Simon Winchester's Knowing What We Know (Harper) which just came out on Tuesday. 📚 Thanks for the recommendation Kimberly!

  13. Mar 2023
    1. Müller, A., and A. Socin. “Heinrich Thorbecke’s Wissenschaftlicher Nachlass Und H. L. Fleischer’s Lexikalische Sammlungen.” Zeitschrift Der Deutschen Morgenländischen Gesellschaft 45, no. 3 (1891): 465–92. https://www.jstor.org/stable/43366657

      Title translation: Heinrich Thorbecke's scientific estate and HL Fleischer's lexical collections Journal of the German Oriental Society

      ... wrote a note. There are about forty smaller and larger card boxes , some of which are not classified, but this work is now being undertaken to organize the library. In all there may be about 100,000 slips of paper; Of course, each note contains only one ...

      Example of a scholar's Nachlass which contains a Zettelkasten.

      Based on this quote, there is a significant zettelkasten example here.

  14. takingnotenow.blogspot.com takingnotenow.blogspot.com
    1. Not sure why Manfred Kuehn removed this website from Blogger, but it's sure to be chock full of interesting discussions and details on his note taking process and practice. Definitely worth delving back several years and mining his repository of articles here.

      http://takingnotenow.blogspot.com/<br /> archive: https://web.archive.org/web/20230000000000*/http://takingnotenow.blogspot.com/

  15. Feb 2023
    1. Simultaneously, it showcases how little actually has changed with therise of digital platforms, where some scholars have sought to build software edifices toemulate card index systems or speak of ‘paper-based tangible interfaces’ for research(Do ̈ring and Beckhaus, 2007; Lu ̈decke, 2015).

      Döring, T. and Beckhaus, S. (2007) ‘The Card Box at Hand: Exploring the Potentials of a Paper-Based Tangible Interface for Education and Research in Art History’. Proceedings of the First International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, February 15-17, 2007. New York, ACM, pp. 87–90.

      Did they have a working system the way Ludeke did?

    2. (Boyd, 2013; Burke, 2014; Krajewski, 2011: 9-20, 57; Zedel-maier, 2002)

      Most of these are on my list, but doublecheck them...

    3. in 1917 he celebrated his fifty-thousandth card with an article titled ‘Siyum’, referencing the celebration upon conclud-ing study of a tractate of Talmud (Deutsch, 1917b).

      Did he write about his zettelkasten in this article?! Deutsch, G. (1917b) ‘Siyum’, American Israelite, 8 March, 15 March.


      Gotthard Deutsch celebrated his fifty thousandth card in 1917. ᔥ

    1. A Luhmann web article from 2001-06-30!

      Berzbach, Frank. “Künstliche Intelligenz aus Holz.” Online magazine. Magazin für junge Forschung, June 30, 2001. https://sciencegarden.net/kunstliche-intelligenz-aus-holz/.


      Interesting to see the stark contrast in zettelkasten method here in an article about Luhmann versus the discussions within the blogosphere, social media, and other online spaces circa 2018-2022.


      ᔥ[[Daniel Lüdecke]] in Arbeiten mit (elektronischen) Zettelkästen at 2013-08-30 (accessed:: 2023-02-10 06:15:58)

    1. Mattei, Clara E. The Capital Order: How Economists Invented Austerity and Paved the Way to Fascism. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2022. https://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/C/bo181707138.html.

      I've always wondered why the United States never used the phrase austerity to describe political belt tightening.

    1. M. G. Marmot, G. Rose, M. Shipley, P. J. Hamilton, Employment grade and coronary heart disease in British civil servants.J. Epidemiol. Community Health32,244–249 (1978).7R. M. Sapolsky, The influence of social hierarchy on primate health.Science308, 648–652 (2005)

      Want to read with respect to https://hypothes.is/a/hFZ1mqTgEe2MHU8Jfedg_A

    2. Kawakatsu et al. (1) make an important ad-vance in the quest for this kind of understanding, pro-viding a general model for how subtle differences inindividual-level decision-making can lead to hard-to-miss consequences for society as a whole.Their work (1) reveals two distinct regimes—oneegalitarian, one hierarchical—that emerge fromshifts in individual-level judgment. These lead to sta-tistical methods that researchers can use to reverseengineer observed hierarchies, and understand howsignaling systems work when prestige and power arein play.

      M. Kawakatsu, P. S. Chodrow, N. Eikmeier, D. B. Larremore, Emergence of hierarchy in networked endorsement dynamics. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 118, e2015188118 (2021)

      This may be of interest to Jerry Michalski et al.

  16. Jan 2023
    1. It was Eric Williams (Capitalism and Slavery) who first developed the idea thatEuropean slave plantations in the New World were, in effect, the first factories; theidea of a “pre-racial” North Atlantic proletariat, in which these same techniques ofmechanization, surveillance, and discipline were applied to workers on ships, waselaborated by Peter Linebaugh and Marcus Rediker (The Many-Headed Hydra).

      What sort of influence did these sorts of philosophy have on educational practices of their day and how do they reflect on our current educational milieu?

    1. Aglavra · 1 day agoNo, but I'm currently reading A place for everything https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/51770484-a-place-for-everything , which seems to be on similar topic - evolution of information management in the past.

      Flanders, Judith. A Place For Everything: The Curious History of Alphabetical Order. Main Market edition. London: Picador, 2021.

    1. Achille Mbembe’s recent essay‘‘Decolonizing the University: New Direc-tions’’ (2016), which urges attention to thelarge and difficult intellectual questionsinvolved in the reform project.

      Read

  17. Dec 2022
    1. The work of the late Elinor Ostrom, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences in 2009, points to the fallacy of this assumption. Her Nobel Prize lecture is titled “Beyond Markets and States: Polycentric Governance of Complex Economic Systems.” Ostrom’s research focused on the organization of what she called “common pool resources.” To pick a prominent example, the free-for-all dumping of carbon into the air could be considered a degradation of the common pool resource of our global atmosphere, resulting in climate change. Among her conclusions: more often than not, effective resource management solutions come from the bottom rather than the top. Ostrom also argued that “a core goal of public policy should be to facilitate the development of institutions that bring out the best in humans.”20

      Read

    1. Started reading: Edge of Cymru by Julie Brominicks 📚

      https://microblog.onemanandhisblog.com/2022/12/09/started-reading-edge.html

      This looks fantastic. I had just bookmarked @richardcarter's On the Moor: Science, History and Nature on a Country Walk earlier this week. Apparently serendipity is pulling this genre of books to me this week.

  18. Nov 2022
    1. Readings:Bhambra, Gurminder K. and John Holmwood 2021. ‘Du Bois: Addressing the Colour Line’ in Colonialism and Modern Social Theory. Cambridge: PolityDu Bois, W. E. B. 1935. Black Reconstruction: An Essay toward a History of the Part which Black Folk Played in the Attempt to Reconstruct Democracy in America, 1860-1880. Philadelphia: Albert Saifer PublisherDu Bois, W. E. B. 1997 [1903]. The Souls of Black Folk. Edited and with an Introduction by David W. Blight and Robert Gooding-Williams. Boston: Bedford BooksDu Bois, W. E. B. 2007 [1945]. Color and Democracy. Introduction by Gerald Horne. Oxford: Oxford University PressItzigsohn, José and Karida L. Brown 2020. The Sociology of W. E. B. du Bois: Racialized Modernity and the Global Color Line. New York: New York University PressLewis, David Levering 2000. W. E. B. Du Bois: The Fight for Equality and the American Century, 1919-1963. New York: Henry Holt and CompanyMorris, Aldon 2015. A Scholar Denied: W.E.B. Du Bois and the Birth of Modern Sociology. Oakland: University of California Press

      Readings about Du Bois

    1. The Durkheimian School and Colonialism: Exploring the Constitutive Paradox’

      I'd like to find and read this at some point

    1. The traditional RFP/RFQ process is often burdensome, impersonal and grounded by capitalistic values, which erodes relationships and instead perpetuates a relationship where the client is buying a service or product from a consultant - instead of joining in a “mutual learning partnership” and relationship.

      To read

    1. Kirschner, Paul, and Carl Hendrick. How Learning Happens: Seminal Works in Educational Psychology and What They Mean in Practice. 1st ed. Routledge, 2020. https://www.routledge.com/How-Learning-Happens-Seminal-Works-in-Educational-Psychology-and-What-They/Kirschner-Hendrick/p/book/9780367184575.

      The Ten Deadly Sins of Education by @P_A_Kirschner & @C_Hendrick <br><br>Multitasking was v interesting to read about in their book! Learning pyramid & styles still hang around, sometimes students find out about learning styles & believe it to be true so it's important to bust myths! pic.twitter.com/Kx5GpsehGm

      — Kate Jones (@KateJones_teach) November 10, 2022
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
    1. Samuel Bowles and Herbert Gintis intheir classic Schooling in Capitalist America

      Bowles and Gintis apparently make an argument in Schooling in Capitalist America that changes in education in the late 1800s/early 1900s served the ends of capitalists rather than the people.

    1. Blake, Vernon. Relation in Art: Being a Suggested Scheme of Art Criticism, with Which Is Incorporated a Sketch of a Hypothetic Philosophy of Relation. Oxford University Press, H. Milford, 1925. https://www.google.com/books/edition/Relation_in_Art/BcAgAAAAMAAJ?hl=en

      Suggested by

      "Relation in Art" by Vernon Blake (1925), because it put art criticism on a quasi-scientific footing, articulated what was great about the art of all epochs (including the Greeks), and intelligently criticised the decline of art in the 20th century.

      — Codex OS (@codexeditor) November 5, 2022
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
  19. Oct 2022
    1. Bryan Caplan has made a spirited defense of school as signaling in his book, The Case Against Education. He argues that what is taught in school isn’t particularly useful on the job. Instead, schooling provides a mechanism for figuring out who has the talent, ambition and obedience to learn on the job successfully.
    1. https://www.supermemo.com/en/archives1990-2015/help/read


      via

      Inspired by @cicatriz's Fractal Inquiry and SuperMemo's Incremental Reading, I imported into @RoamResearch a paper I was very impressed (but also overwhelmed) by a few years ago: The Knowledge‐Learning‐Instruction Framework by @koedinger et al. pic.twitter.com/oeJzyjPGbk

      — Stian Håklev (@houshuang) December 16, 2020
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
    1. On this point, for instance, thebook on John Dewey's technique of thought by Bogos-lovsky, The Logic of Controversy, and C.E. Ayers' essayon the gospel of technology in Philosophy Today andTomorrow, edited by Hook and Kallen.

      The Technique of Controversy: Principles of Dynamic Logic by Boris B. Bogoslovsky https://www.google.com/books/edition/The_Technique_of_Controversy/P-rgAwAAQBAJ?hl=en

      What was Dewey's contribution here?


      The Gospel of Technology by C. E. Ayers https://archive.org/details/americanphilosop00kall/page/24/mode/2up

  20. Sep 2022
    1. Federal Reserve Bank, “Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households in2019” (Washington DC: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, 2020).
    2. John Rawls, A Theory of Justice (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1971).
    1. A 2015 study by OSoMe researchers Emilio Ferrara and Zeyao Yang analyzed empirical data about such “emotional contagion” on Twitter and found that people overexposed to negative content tend to then share negative posts, whereas those overexposed to positive content tend to share more positive posts.
    2. In a set of groundbreaking studies in 1932, psychologist Frederic Bartlett told volunteers a Native American legend about a young man who hears war cries and, pursuing them, enters a dreamlike battle that eventually leads to his real death. Bartlett asked the volunteers, who were non-Native, to recall the rather confusing story at increasing intervals, from minutes to years later. He found that as time passed, the rememberers tended to distort the tale's culturally unfamiliar parts such that they were either lost to memory or transformed into more familiar things.

      early study relating to both culture and memory decay

      What does memory decay scale as? Is it different for different levels of "stickiness"?

    1. The fact that too much order can impede learning has becomemore and more known (Carey 2014).
    2. After looking at various studies fromthe 1960s until the early 1980s, Barry S. Stein et al. summarises:“The results of several recent studies support the hypothesis that

      retention is facilitated by acquisition conditions that prompt people to elaborate information in a way that increases the distinctiveness of their memory representations.” (Stein et al. 1984, 522)

      Want to read this paper.

      Isn't this a major portion of what many mnemotechniques attempt to do? "increase distinctiveness of memory representations"? And didn't he just wholly dismiss the entirety of mnemotechniques as "tricks" a few paragraphs back? (see: https://hypothes.is/a/dwktfDiuEe2sxaePuVIECg)

      How can one build or design this into a pedagogical system? How is this potentially related to Andy Matuschak's mnemonic medium research?

    1. I recommended Paul Silvia’s bookHow to write a lot, a succinct, witty guide to academic productivity in the Boicean mode.

      What exactly are Robert Boice and Paul Silvia's methods? How do they differ from the conventional idea of "writing"?

    1. Murray, D. M. (2000). The craft of revision (4th ed.). Boston: Harcourt College Publish-ers.
    2. Elbow, P. (1999). Options for responding to student writing. In R. Straub (Ed.), Asourcebook for responding to student writing (pp. 197-202). Cresskill, NJ: Hampton.
    1. Sword, Helen. “‘Write Every Day!’: A Mantra Dismantled.” International Journal for Academic Development 21, no. 4 (October 1, 2016): 312–22. https://doi.org/10.1080/1360144X.2016.1210153.

      Preliminary thoughts prior to reading:<br /> What advice does Boice give? Is he following in the commonplace or zettelkasten traditions? Is the writing ever day he's talking about really progressive note taking? Is this being misunderstood?

      Compare this to the incremental work suggested by Ahrens (2017).

      Is there a particular delineation between writing for academic research and fiction writing which can be wholly different endeavors from a structural point of view? I see citations of many fiction names here.

      Cross reference: Throw Mama from the Train quote

      A writer writes, always.

    1. However, the ongoing struggle to develop literature synthesis at thedoctoral level suggests that students’ critical reading skills are notsufficiently developed with commonly used strategies and methods(Aitchison et al., 2012; Boote & Beile, 2005).
    1. ABOUT THIS SERIES LAist will examine how dyslexia screening and mitigation work across California's education system every Wednesday for six weeks. August 3: The ScienceAugust 10: The Realities Of Early ChildhoodAugust 17: Policy Meets PracticeAugust 24: Bringing Dyslexia To CollegeAugust 31: How Teachers Are PreparedSeptember 7: Through The Cracks
  21. Aug 2022
    1. Moser, Johann Jacob . 1773. Vortheile vor Canzleyverwandte und Gelehrte in Absicht aufAkten-Verzeichnisse, Auszü ge und Register, desgleichen auf Sammlungen zu kü nfftigenSchrifften und wü rckliche Ausarbeitung derer Schrifften. T ü bingen: Heerbrandt.

      Heavily quoted in chapter 4 with respect to his own zettelkasten/excerpting practice.

      Is there an extant English translation of this?

    1. Heinen, Armin. “Wissensorganisation.” In Handbuch Methoden der Geschichtswissenschaft, edited by Stefan Haas, 1–20. Wiesbaden: Springer Fachmedien, 2020. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-658-27798-7_4-1

      Will have to order or do more work to track down a copy of this and translate it.

      Has a great bibliography to mine for some bits I've been missing.

    1. I stole the title from this Substack post. I cannot put this much better than them: “we’ve chosen to optimize for feelings— to bring the quirks and edges of life back into software. To create something with soul.” Enjoyment is an important component of my day to day. 

      Optimizing for feelings seems to be a broader generational movement (particularly for the progressive movement) in the past decade or more.

      https://browsercompany.substack.com/p/optimizing-for-feelings #wanttoread

    1. Amherst College library described in Colin B. Burke's Information and Intrigue, organized books and cards based on author name. In both cases, the range of books on a shelf was random.

      Information and Intrigue by Colin B. Burke

    1. Systematische Anleitung zur Theorie und Praxis der Mnemonik : nebst den Grundlinien zur Geschichte u. Kritik dieser Wissenschaft : mit 3 Kupfertaf. by Johann Christoph Aretin( Book )18 editions published in 1810 in 3 languages and held by 52 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

      Google translation:<br /> Systematic instructions for the theory and practice of mnemonics: together with the basic lines for the history and criticism of this science: with 3 copper plates.

      First published in 1810 in German

      http://worldcat.org/identities/lccn-n83008343/

  22. Jul 2022
    1. most people need to talk out an idea in order to think about it2.

      D. J. Levitin, The organized mind: thinking straight in the age of information overload. New York, N.Y: Dutton, 2014. #books/wanttoread

      A general truism in my experience, but I'm curious what else Levitin has to say on this subject.

  23. Jun 2022
    1. Reid, A. J. (Ed.). (2018). Marginalia in Modern Learning Contexts. New York: IGI Global.

      Heard about this at the Hypothes.is SOCIAL LEARNING SUMMIT: Spotlight on Social Reading & Social Annotation

  24. www.sas.ac.uk