21 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2022
    1. https://www.reddit.com/r/antinet/comments/x2f4hn/should_i_always_create_a_bibnote/

      Here's a good example of my having written a response to something that only moments later disappeared thus roughly making my reply disappear and potentially be unfindable. Fortunately, Hypothes.is and my digital notes and content still remain, at least for me.

      Of course there was more context than my short highlight captured, but I still at least have the general gist.

  2. Jul 2022
    1. Famously, Luswig Wittgenstein organized his thoughts this way. Also famously, he never completed his 'big book' - almost all of his books (On Certainty, Philosophical Investigations, Zettel, etc.) were compiled by his students in the years after his death.

      I've not looked directly at Wittgenstein's note collection before, but it could be an interesting historical example.


      Might be worth collecting examples of what has happened to note collections after author's lives. Some obviously have been influential in scholarship, but generally they're subsumed by the broader category of a person's "papers" which are often archived at libraries, museums, and other institutions.

      Examples: - Vincentius Placcius' collection used by his students - Niklas Luhmann's zettelkasten which is being heavily studied by Johannes F.K. Schmidt - Mortimer J. Adler - was his kept? where is it stored?

      Posthumously published note card collections - Ludwig Wittgenstein - Walter Benjamin's Arcades Project - Ronald Reagan's collection at his presidential library, though it is more of an commonplace book collection of quotes which was later published - Roland Barthes' Mourning Diary - Vladimir Nabokov's The Original of Laura - others...


      Just as note collections serve an autobiographical function, perhaps they may also serve as an intellectual autobiographical function? Wittgenstein never managed to complete his 'big book', but in some sense, doesn't his collection of note cards serve this function for those willing to explore it all?


      I'd previously suggested that Scott P. Scheper publish not only his book on note taking, but to actually publish his note cards as a stand-alone zettelkasten example to go with them. What if this sort of publishing practice were more commonplace? The modern day equivalent is more likely a person's blog or their wiki. Not enough people are publicly publishing their notes to see what this practice might look like for future generations.

  3. May 2022
    1. You may find this book in the “self-improvement” category, but in adeeper sense it is the opposite of self-improvement. It is aboutoptimizing a system outside yourself, a system not subject to you

      imitations and constraints, leaving you happily unoptimized and free to roam, to wonder, to wander toward whatever makes you feel alive here and now in each moment.

      Some may categorize handbooks on note taking within the productivity space as "self-help" or "self-improvement", but still view it as something that happens outside of ones' self. Doesn't improving one's environment as a means of improving things for oneself count as self-improvement?

      Marie Kondo's minimalism techniques are all external to the body, but are wholly geared towards creating internal happiness.

      Because your external circumstances are important to your internal mental state, external environment and decoration can be considered self-improvement.


      Could note taking be considered exbodied cognition? Vannevar Bush framed the Memex as a means of showing associative trails. (Let's be honest, As We May Think used the word trail far too much.)

      How does this relate to orality vs. literacy?

      Orality requires the immediate mental work for storage while literacy removes some of the work by making the effort external and potentially giving it additional longevity.

    1. At one level this is true, but at another level how long is the life of the information that you're putting into your wiki now, and how sure are you that something this could never happen to your wiki software over that lifetime?

      I dunno. Was the wiki software in question MediaWiki?

      I always thought it was weird when people would set up a wiki and'd go for something that wasn't MediaWiki (even though I have my own quibbles with it). MediaWiki was always the clear winner to me, even in 2012 without the benefit of another 10 years of hindsight.

  4. Feb 2022
    1. My preservation solution is to federate the content. It is only through proliferation that things really last. Much of our genome, for example, is more stable than the earth's continents. That's something. The internet is speedy but life is tenacious.

      —Ward Cunningham

    1. https://interconnected.org/home/2021/02/10/reservoirs

      I like that he suggest to watch out for longevity as it's been rare for an app or set up to last longer than 20 years. Portability in note taking is key.

      Editing can become a time suck, so don't do it and rely on the system to unearth the things you thought might be important in the future. Accrete ideas and make connections. They'll eventually begin outgassing new ideas (like layers of fermenting trash in the town dump).

  5. Nov 2021
  6. Aug 2021
    1. Want to Write a Book? You Probably Already Have!

      Patrick Rhone

      video

      Paper is the best solution for the long term. If it's not on paper it can be important, if it's not it won't be.

      Our writing is important. It is durable.

      All we know about the past is what survived.

      Analogy: coke:champaign glass::blogger:book

      Converting one's blog into a book.

      "The funny thing about minimalism is that there's only so much you can say."

      Change the frame and suddenly you've changed the experience.

  7. Jun 2021
  8. May 2021
    1. Similarly, while individual artefacts may be fragile, their lineage is likely to continue if they serve and extend deeply-rooted needs. Hence the innovator’s twin adages: “what significant problem does it solve?” and “how does it make life easier?” If you can’t answer either of these questions about something new – if you can’t in some way connect the temporary to the timeless – it probably makes sense to wait rather than betting the farm.
  9. Apr 2021
  10. Mar 2021
    1. These newsletters are the most backed up pieces of writing in history, copies in millions of inboxes, on millions of hard drives and servers, far more than any blog post. More robust than an Internet Archive container. LOCKSS to the max. These might be the most durable copies yet of ourselves. They’re everywhere but privately so, hidden, piggybacking on the most accessible, oldest networked publishing platform in the world.

      This is an interesting point about longevity of content. It's definitely a good reason to email it out as well as to post it on your own website and archive it all at the same time.

  11. Feb 2021
    1. Ed Regis also reported that, as a student at Oxford, More “kept a heart-lung resuscitator in hisdorm room, just in case.”513More has also noted that his undergraduate dorm room was a source of fascination to many of his peers as it housed “several shelves of bottles and pills, and people would come to my room and goggle-eye at them.”

      This seems a bit neurotic, but perhaps I'm missing something.

  12. Nov 2020
    1. to be listed on Mastodon’s official site, an instance has to agree to follow the Mastodon Server Covenant which lays out commitments to “actively moderat[e] against racism, sexism, homophobia and transphobia”, have daily backups, grant more than one person emergency access, and notify people three months in advance of potential closure. These indirect methods are meant to ensure that most people who encounter a platform have a safe experience, even without the advantages of centralization.

      Some of these baseline protections are certainly a good idea. The idea of advance notice of shut down and back ups are particularly valuable.

      I'd not know of the Mastodon Server Covenant before.

  13. Aug 2020
    1. Successful long-lived open systems owe their success to building decades-long micro-communities around extensions/plugins, also known as a marketplace.

      This could be said of most early web standards like HTML as well...

  14. Jun 2019
  15. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. the quality of connection

      A tangential thought that may be addressed elsewhere, but I'm curious how/if CL in its various forms affects whether or not a teacher remains in the profession. Given our nation's teacher shortage, can/is CL be(ing) used to create and maintain communities that help teachers stay and grow in their classrooms?

  16. Feb 2018
  17. Jul 2017
    1. That progress has been spurred by huge investments from Silicon Valley titans, including Google’s Sergey Brin and Larry Page, Amazon’s Jeff Bezos, PayPal cofounder Peter Thiel, and Oracle cofounder Larry Ellison.

      Billionaires want to live forever.