50 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2022
  2. Oct 2022
    1. It may be that the more concrete boundaries that having multiple instances provide can dampen down the cascades caused by the small world network effect. It is an interesting model to coexist between the silos with global scope and the personal domains beloved by the indieweb. In indieweb we have been saying ‘build things that you want for yourself’, but building things that you want for your friends or organisation is a useful step between generations.

      I'd say not just interesting, but also crucial. Where T and FB operate at generic level (despite FB pages as subgroups), the statistical, and IndieWeb on the personal (my site, my self-built tool), M works at group level or just above (bigger instances). That middle ground between singular and the statistical is where complexity resides and where it needs to be addressed and embraced. The network metaphor favors that intermediate level.

    1. https://glasp.co/home

      Glasp is a startup competitor in the annotations space that appears to be a subsidiary web-based tool and response to a large portion of the recent spate of note taking applications.

      Some of the first users and suggested users are names I recognize from this tools for thought space.

      On first blush it looks like it's got a lot of the same features and functionality as Hypothes.is, but it also appears to have some slicker surfaces and user interface as well as a much larger emphasis on the social aspects (followers/following) and gamification (graphs for how many annotations you make, how often you annotate, streaks, etc.).

      It could be an interesting experiment to watch the space and see how quickly it both scales as well as potentially reverts to the mean in terms of content and conversation given these differences. Does it become a toxic space via curation of the social features or does it become a toxic intellectual wasteland when it reaches larger scales?

      What will happen to one's data (it does appear to be a silo) when the company eventually closes/shuts down/acquihired/other?

      The team behind it is obviously aware of Hypothes.is as one of the first annotations presented to me is an annotation by Kei, a cofounder and PM at the company, on the Hypothes.is blog at: https://web.hypothes.is/blog/a-letter-to-marc-andreessen-and-rap-genius/

      But this is true for Glasp. Science researchers/writers use it a lot on our service, too.—Kei

      cc: @dwhly @jeremydean @remikalir

  3. Jul 2022
    1. Silos, by their very nature of being centralized services under the control of the privileged, cannot be good if you look at the power structures imposed by them. Instead, we should use our privilege to lift others up, something that commercial silos, by design, are incapable of doing.
  4. Jun 2022
    1. This podcast is also available on Spotify, Apple Podcasts and Anchor. Please subscribe on your favoured podcast provider and leave a review.

      There are actually seven different services that this podcaster has done a huge amount of work to put their content on, ostensibly for the widest discovery, but not a single one of them has a link to the raw audio file to make it easy for one to bookmark and listen to later. Apparently the podcasting silo services have managed to win out over the open web.

      Do we really need to make podcasting this hard on individual publishers? Why can't the publisher just have one location and tell all the aggregators, here's a link to my feed, copy it if you will and want to help distribute my content? In some sense, this is part of what is happening as all seven services are using the same findable source, they're just making it more difficult to jump through all the hoops, which means the small guys end up paying more to do the extra work and potentially lose everything if that one source disappears, closes down, or gets acquired and goes away.

      These sorts of artificial hurdles and problems are what make it so hard to get up and running.

  5. May 2022
    1. We believe that Facebook is also actively encouraging people to use tools like Buffer Publish for their business or organization, rather than personal use. They are continuing to support the use of Facebook Pages, rather than personal Profiles, for things like scheduling and analytics.

      Of course they're encouraging people to do this. Pushing them to the business side is where they're making all the money.

    1. The main thing Smith has learned over the past seven years is “the importance of ownership.” He admitted that Tumblr initially helped him “build a community around the idea of digital news.” However, it soon became clear that Tumblr was the only one reaping the rewards of its growing community. As he aptly put it, “Tumblr wasn’t seriously thinking about the importance of revenue or business opportunities for their creators.”
  6. Apr 2022
  7. Feb 2022
    1. Sie helfen beispielsweise, die heterogenen Datensilos eines Unternehmens zu erschließen, sie intelligent zu verknüpfen, neu zu interpretieren und im Firmen-Intranet gezielt bereitzustellen.

      Potential von semantischen Technologien: Auflösung von heterogenen Daten-Silos Technologie: Linked Data

  8. Jan 2022
    1. Still, link-in-bio companies have built-in risks that can make the idea of them sticking around for the long term feel like a fantasy. They rely almost entirely on Instagram and TikTok for their traffic. If the two platforms wanted to, they could replicate many of the new tools that link-in-bio companies have rolled out. “Instagram’s specialty is figuring out other third-party services that are building things on top of their platform and then duplicating those services themselves,” Haberman said. For example, after Instagram users began posting affiliate links to Amazon and other e-commerce sites in order to earn a commission from the products they hype, the platform introduced its own affiliate tool that keeps users from leaving Instagram.

      Regardless of what third party businesses do, they'll always be at the mercy of the major platforms. And as a result, the users that rely on them will always be stuck in an arms race.

    1. https://web.archive.org/web/20081030052305/http://www.solutionwatch.com/368/fifty-ways-to-take-notes/

      Mostly an historical list of online tools for note taking.

      No discussion of actual functionality or usefulness. Sounds more like for making to do lists and passing notes rather than long term knowledge management and upkeep. Nothing about the benefits of centralizing data in one place.

      meh...

  9. Jul 2021
    1. This looks like a bookmarking service that is billing itself as a digital commonplace book. I'm not sure about the digital ownership aspect, but it does have a relatively pretty UI.

      Looks like it works via a Chrome extension: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/commonplaces-your-digital/ckiapimepnnpdnoehhmghgpmiondhbof

    1. Platforms of the Facebook walled-factory type are unsuited to thework of building community, whether globally or locally, becausesuch platforms are unresponsive to their users, and unresponsive bydesign (design that is driven by a desire to be universal in scope). Itis virtually impossible to contact anyone at Google, Facebook,Twitter, or Instagram, and that is so that those platforms can trainus to do what they want us to do, rather than be accountable to ourdesires and needs

      This is one of the biggest underlying problems that centralized platforms often have. It's also a solid reason why EdTech platforms are pernicious as well.

    2. It is common to refer to universally popular social media sites likeFacebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and Pinterest as “walled gardens.”But they are not gardens; they are walled industrial sites, withinwhich users, for no financial compensation, produce data which theowners of the factories sift and then sell. Some of these factories(Twitter, Tumblr, and more recently Instagram) have transparentwalls, by which I mean that you need an account to post anythingbut can view what has been posted on the open Web; others(Facebook, Snapchat) keep their walls mostly or wholly opaque.

      Would it be useful to distinguish and differentiate the silos based on their level of access? Some are transparent silos while others are not?

      Could we define a spectrum from silo to open? Perhaps axes based on audience or access? Privacy to fully open? How many axes might there be?

  10. May 2021
    1. Your new home on the web

      Understory is a digital garden, a micro-publishing space for you to plant the seeds of your ideas and grow them into bi-directionally linked web portals.

      via IndieWeb Chat

    1. Some newspapers, most recently the New York Times, have forbidden writers from launching personal newsletters without permission.

      Using their platform to build your own platform apparently isn't kosher any more?

    2. The main way to monetise online content has been advertising. Making real money requires a huge audience: even 1m views on YouTube might make the poster only about $2,000. Some types of content attract even lower ad rates. PornHub says its amateur contributors earn an average of $0.60 per 1,000 views; 1m hits would net just $600. Ads can make megastars rich, but cannot provide a living for small-time foot goddesses and other niche creators.

      More thumbnail details about ad earnings for creators online.

    3. Yet what of those creators with more modest followings? A few online stars earn megabucks, but the tail is long (see charts). Spotify says it wants to give “a million creative artists the opportunity to live off their art”. But only about 0.2% of the 7m-plus musicians on the platform make more than $50,000 a year in royalties; just 3% make more than $1,000. There are 20m gaming “experiences” on Roblox, but nearly 15% of all play takes place on one game, “Brookhaven RP”, according to analysis by Ran Mo of Electronic Arts, a game developer. On Patreon, where people can subscribe to creative services of all sorts, 200,000 creators earn a total of $1bn a year. The top earner makes around $2m, but about 98% make less than the federal minimum wage of $1,257 a month.

      Some reasonable basic stats showing how rough this market can be for creators.

    4. The share of revenue that creators can earn seems to depend on how easily they could leave. Moving one’s email list away from Substack is simple, so the firm lets writers keep 90% of their revenues. Game-makers on Roblox, who are basically stuck there, keep about 25%.
    5. Last month Apple announced that it would let podcasters charge subscription fees, of which it would take a 30% cut for the first year, then dropping to 15%; days later Spotify followed suit—but said creators could keep the lot (from 2023 it will take 5%).

      Good to see some of these platforms competing for creators this way. The big question is will the creators really "own" their audiences? or will they just be stuck in a silo in a few years with prices rising?

  11. Apr 2021
    1. Just the sort of draconian silo activity you'd imagine that Apple would be doing.

      So much for their free and open directory as their position in the space.

    1. A tool targeted at journalists that appears to be a silo-based app for backing up/archiving articles on the web as well as providing analytics, newsletter/email functionalities, and other options.

  12. Mar 2021
  13. Feb 2021
  14. Jan 2021
    1. I started working on a social immune system for twitter leveraging their API. Eventually, I realized that trying to build an elaborate sandcastle on someone else’s private beach isn’t the smartest of plays.
  15. Nov 2020
  16. Oct 2020
    1. the technology platforms we rely on are changing and to leave things the way they are is to put our work at risk.
    1. Legislation to stem the tide of Big Tech companies' abuses, and laws—such as a national consumer privacy bill, an interoperability bill, or a bill making firms liable for data-breaches—would go a long way toward improving the lives of the Internet users held hostage inside the companies' walled gardens. But far more important than fixing Big Tech is fixing the Internet: restoring the kind of dynamism that made tech firms responsive to their users for fear of losing them, restoring the dynamic that let tinkerers, co-ops, and nonprofits give every person the power of technological self-determination.
    2. Today's Web giants want us to believe that they and they alone are suited to take us to wherever we end up next. Having used Adversarial Interoperability as a ladder to attain their rarefied heights, they now use laws to kick the ladder away and prevent the next Microcomputer Center or Tim Berners-Lee from doing to them what the Web did to Gopher, and what Gopher did to mainframes.
    1. But what if, in 2019, we take a step back and decide not to let the platform decide how to run the show?

      The IndieWeb has already made some solid strides.

    1. Micro.blog is not an alternative silo: instead, it’s what you build when you believe that the web itself is the great social network.

      So true!!!

    1. shifting it to another company which then gets to control (and even monetize) the conversation.

      As I've heard in the Indieweb chat: "Silos gonna silo."

    1. In fact, these platforms have become inseparable from their data: we use “Facebook” to refer to both the application and the data that drives that application. The result is that nearly every Web app today tries to ask you for more and more data again and again, leading to dangling data on duplicate and inconsistent profiles we can no longer manage. And of course, this comes with significant privacy concerns.
  17. Jul 2020
    1. While we believe that the Medium platform and network provide incredible advantages for writers, we also believe that our platform should inherit the power and creativity of the open web, not be walled off from it.

      They haven't generally taken this stance before. They've spent a lot of time and effort to specifically wall themselves away from the rest of the web. They've even taken away the ability to bring your own domain to the product. This seems like just too much lip service.

    2. We know how important it is for creators to be able to not just make a space on the internet for their work, but to make their own space, to create context and a sense of place, and to establish their personal brands.

      How many years has it taken them to realize this?

  18. Dec 2019
    1. And other recent developments suggest that doing so could overcome many of the earlier pitfalls of protocol-based systems, potentially creating the best of all words: useful internet services, with competition driving innovation, not controlled solely by giant corporations, but financially sustainable, providing end users with more control over their own data and privacy—and providing mis- and disinformation far fewer opportunities to wreak havoc.

      Some of the issue with this then becomes: "Who exactly creates these standards?" We already have issues with mega-corporations like Google wielding out sized influence in the ability to create new standards like Schema.org or AMP.

      Who is to say they don't tacitly design their standards to directly (and only) benefit themselves?

  19. May 2019
    1. No representatives from over the over 35 publishers who attended felt they could confidently predict where Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat or any other growing social media platforms would be in five or 10 years.

      What is the product? Who is helping whom?

    2. However unlike a user account, you don’t own your audience and can be kicked out any day.
  20. Mar 2019
    1. The fact is, though, it is often genuinely difficult for users without a decent amount of technical experience to find the right balance. Many systems don’t make it easy to find, organize and back up valuable files, while shunting more ephemeral data to the digital trash heap. Social networking sites are notoriously difficult to search, let alone download content from. Cloud services shut down or change policies often with little notice, said the Archive Team’s Jason Scott, like Tumblr’s about-face on erotic pictures, Google’s move to shut down social network Google+ or the venerable photo-sharing site Flickr’s recent announcement it would begin purging images from legacy free accounts with more than 1,000 pictures uploaded as of March 12.
  21. Jan 2019
    1. Isaacson pointed out that more than 7,000 pages from Da Vinci’s notebooks survived to today–a stretch of 500 years. He asked how many of our tweets and Facebook posts will survive even 50 years. Paper, it turns out, is a durable medium of information storage.
  22. Dec 2018
    1. It’s not just that the silos can shut down their feeds. It’s that we allowed ourselves to get herded into them in the first place.
  23. Jul 2018
    1. If you use Twitter, your friend Alice only uses Facebook, your friend Bob only uses his blog on WordPress, and your pal Chuck is over on Medium, it’s impossible for any one of you to @mention another. You’re all on different and competing platforms, none of which interoperate to send these mentions or notifications of them. The only way to communicate in this way is if you all join the same social media platforms, resulting in the average person being signed up to multiple services just to stay in touch with all their friends and acquaintances.
  24. Feb 2016
    1. new generation comes along and they see how to make progress outside the silo

      Compare Decentralization is Hard Maybe Too Hard @windley. Dave is more optimistic.