33 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2022
    1. Thinking clearly about technological progress versus technological hype requires us to consider the question of why people buy and adopt new technologies in general. A type of academic analysis called the technology acceptance model identifies two notable factors: perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness. That is, we embrace new technologies when they seem easy enough to use and when we believe they will help us do something worthwhile.
  2. May 2022
    1. you saw the inevitable blog posts in the blogosphere and the youtubers picked it up and if you actually did it like cold adaption it was very easy to see who actually did 00:04:34 it themselves and then had some practical experience and some people like just researched it and like i think you you know it like when people say like the 12 best tips for x and y 00:04:47 yeah and um you have this kind of blog post that's obvious like easy grabs for content

      There are likely far more people talking about zettelkasten and writing short, simple blogposts and articles about it than those who are actually practicing it and seeing benefit from it.

      Finding public examples of people practicing and showing their work in the zettelkasten space are few and far between.

      This effect likely increases the availability bias of Niklas Luhmann's zettelkasten which is frequently spoken of, but it also has the benefit of being online, even if it's primarily written in German.

    1. After taking my course

      always be marketing... there's a hidden nudge here that there might be knowledge in the course that isn't contained in this book...

    2. A revolutionary approach to enhancing productivity,creating flow, and vastly increasing your ability tocapture, remember, and benefit from the unprecedentedamount of information all around us.

      Some great marketing copy, but I'm anticipating a book that is going to lay out some general techniques that go under the topic of commonplace book, a concept that goes back over 2,000 years. This is the opposite of revolutionary.

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. and link me to a paid course, no doubt

      I will agree that there are far too many "influencers" and "gurus" out there selling something in the note taking space. Almost none of them know what the hell they're talking about.

  3. Feb 2022
    1. Most writing is chasing clout, rather than insight

      As the result of online business models and SEO, most writing becomes about chasing clout and audience eyeballs rather than providing thought provoking insight and razor sharp analysis. The audience reaction has weakened with the anger reaction machines like Twitter.

      We need better business models that aren't built on hype.

    1. Hypehouses were a development that made middle-aged people feel even older. The idea of random people living together to make TikTok videos sounds like hell on earth. And it turns out to be pretty much hell on earth.

      Hypehouse (collab house) examples: * https://www.vox.com/the-goods/22877013/hype-house-netflix-show * https://www.cosmopolitan.com/entertainment/celebs/a34655703/tiktok-sway-house/ * https://harpers.org/archive/2021/06/tiktok-house-collab-house-the-anxiety-of-influencers/ * Does Clubhouse, the app, count? It seemed like a hypehouse for hyping hype.


      What happens when hype runs amok?

    2. Now, he promises “the most ambitious journalism experiment in decades.”

      Hype example at the very start of a project.

  4. Jan 2022
  5. Aug 2020
    1. It can come as a refreshment to follow the hype and ride the bandwagon from time to time, but you should always do your research first.
    2. The hype is something common in our industry. Remember NoSQL? Or when everyone went crazy over microservices? Or the AI / Machine learning burst? The list goes on and on. People get excited about new and breakthrough technologies and ideas.
  6. Nov 2019
  7. Nov 2017
    1. The idea that we can collaboratively build a platform that will frame the discourse and promote sharing is a promising aftereffect of the current MOOC backlash.

      Since the term “disruptive” has come to be associated with Clay Christensen’s model, there might be something closer to a reappropriation model like Hippies appropriating VW Beetles, Roadsworth painting pedestrian crossings into zippers, or circuit benders making musical instruments out of old toys. Somewhere, someone may subvert a MOOC into something useful. In fact, Arshad Ahmad once described a successful MOOC which had lost its instructors. Learners started owning their learning activities.

    2. basic Web 2.0 premises of aggregation, openness, tagging, portability, reuse, multichannel distribution, syndication, and user-as-contributor
    3. the experimentation and possibility of the MOOC movement had become co-opted and rebranded by venture capitalists as a fully formed, disruptive solution to the broken model of higher education.11
    4. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), which have become the poster child of innovation in higher education over the last two to three years
    1. Alan Levine’s comment also needs to be kept for posterity:

      I so appreciate the framing of this history for the oMOOC (Original) as "courses of lectures" which seems not focused on the lectures but the discussions generated. And thanks for the mention of the ds106 assignment bank (a concept I seem to suggest in every project) but I must make a small historical credit. Grant Potter was definitely part of the foundation, but his great contribution was DS106 Radio. The person who credit for the Assignment Bank must go to is Martha Burtis who did this and more for co-creating DS106, but she's often invisible in the Shadow of Groom. I did the archeology on the Assignment Bank history: http://cogdogblog.com/2016/10/ds106-history-details/ I dream that someone would fund you to roll out the model described, maybe it's a dMOOC (Downsian) not that it would likely overtake the xMOOC Hype Train (which all its is shiny conductors have jumped off the train, i just keeps rolling through burgs like EdSurge).

    2. access to one-on-one (and possible small circle) consultations for a fee
    3. We (had we ever been given the opportunity) would have created the business proposition very differently.
    4. access to the top researchers in the field
    5. I think that universities (especially the 'elite' universities) have lost the plot when it comes to their value proposition (or, at least, what they tell the world their value proposition is).

      In some ways, the strongest indictment of the MOOC hype.

    1. the way of MOOCs – a few years of wild hype about revolutionary potential followed by inevitable domestication by the academy.

      That sure is one way to put it. Same expectation for #NGDLE?

  8. Sep 2016
    1. Steven Mintz is Executive Director of the University of Texas System's Institute for Transformational Learning and Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin.

      Sounds like MOOCs have been part of his role, at least in UT’s collaboration with edX. Which brings an interesting context to the piece, especially in view of what we might call “the end of the MOOC moment”.

  9. Aug 2016
    1. one iteration from success!
    2. Interestingly, the other MOOC professor at Stanford in 2011, who was not part of the media push or start-up aftermath,  was Jennifer Widom.  She has continued to teach MOOCs since 2011, and during her current sabbatical year is offering free courses in data and design…and those free courses are going to be in-person.

      This puts MOOC hype in perspective, including the Matthew Effect.

  10. Jul 2016
    1. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have been the subject of much hyperbole in the educational/eLearning world for a few years now, under the guise of spreading university-quality education to the masses for free (the hyperbole is dwindling down, but not completely).

      Cue Rolin Moe, who has investigated the MOOC hype so thoroughly. We may still follow a Gartner Cycle (Merton did warn us about self-fulfilling prophesies). But much of those phases have been documented.

    2. A Postcolonial Look at the Future of #EdTech

      Timely. Sent it to a few people, already, as it connects with several discussions we’ve been having on neocolonialism in EdTech, including the content side of Open Education (OER). Some of it reminds me of Crissinger’s critical take on OER, based on her experience with Open Access.

    1. disheartened that open education is still mainly focused on MOOCs and OERs, rather than on the broader concept of open textbooks, open research, and open data.

      We often think of the hype cycle but two things this post reveals about MOOC hype: 1) There can be regional differences in the timing of those cycles. 2) We might be in a broad shift from MOOC as a thing to MOOC as a pretext for openness.

    2. MOOCs have forced Vice Chancellors to focus on teaching and learning This is probably a true if sad statement.

      My thoughts exactly. Same was true of McG’s Tony Massi saying that MOOCs got a few science teachers to rethink their teaching for the first time in decades.

  11. Dec 2015