901 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. partnerships, networking, and revenue generation such as donations, memberships, pay what you want, and crowdfunding

      I have thought long about the same issue and beyond. The triple (wiki, Hypothesis, donations) could be a working way to search for OER, form a social group processing them, and optionally support the creators.

      I imagine that as follows: a person wants to learn about X. They can head to the wiki site about X and look into its Hypothesis annotations, where relevant OER with their preferred donation method can be linked. Also, study groups interested in the respective resource or topic can list virtual or live meetups there. The date of the meetups could be listed in a format that Hypothesis could search and display on a calendar.

      Wiki is integral as it categorizes knowledge, is comprehensive, and strives to address biases. Hypothesis stitches websites together for the benefit of the site owners and the collective wisdom that emerges from the discussions. Donations support the creators so they can dedicate their time to creating high-quality resources.

      Main inspirations:

      Deschooling Society - Learning Webs

      Building the Global Knowledge Graph

      Schoolhouse calendar

  2. Nov 2022
    1. Data collected through this study showed nosignificant difference for the retention andcompletion rates as compared to students enrolledin non-OER course

      Surprised by this, although we've seen similar data locally. Would a longer term study show more difference?

  3. Oct 2022
    1. 13 h 20 – Ma classe, une plateforme incontournable aux multiples possibilités!   Cet atelier vous fera découvrir le potentiel de Ma classe de l'École ouverte, la plateforme nationale de ressources éducatives numériques. Les animatrices présenteront les grandes fonctionnalités de la plateforme et proposeront différentes activités d'exploration. Notamment, elles guideront les participants à travers des défis pour rechercher, créer et partager des ressources éducatives numériques. Les participants repartiront avec tout le bagage nécessaire pour initier leurs élèves à l’utilisation de la plateforme. Différents outils complémentaires seront également fournis afin qu'ils puissent demeurer autonomes dans leur familiarisation avec la plateforme. Découvrir Ma classe, c'est l'adopter! Il est à noter que pour tirer profit de cet atelier, les participants doivent faire partie d’organismes scolaires dont l’entente de services avec le Ministère est signée et y ayant accès grâce à la connexion par leur portail scolaire, soit Mozaïk (GRICS), Pluriportail (Plurilogic) ou PedNET (Berger-Levrault). Animatrices : Émilie Rondeau-Courtois, Martine Thériault et Manon Légaré
  4. Sep 2022
    1. @BenjaminVanDyneReplying to @ChrisAldrichI wish I had a good answer! The book I use when I teach is Joseph Harris’s “rewriting” which is technically a writing book but teaches well as a book about how to read in a writerly way.

      Thanks for this! I like the framing and general concept of the book.

      It seems like its a good follow on to Dan Allosso's OER text How to Make Notes and Write https://minnstate.pressbooks.pub/write/ or Sönke Ahrens' How to Take Smart Notes https://amzn.to/3DwJVMz which includes some useful psychology and mental health perspective.

      Other similar examples are Umberto Eco's How to Write a Thesis (MIT, 2015) or Gerald Weinberg's The Fieldstone Method https://amzn.to/3DCf6GA These may be some of what we're all missing.

      I'm reminded of Mark Robertson's (@calhistorian) discussion of modeling his note taking practice and output in his classroom using Roam Research. https://hyp.is/QuB5NDa0Ee28hUP7ExvFuw/thatsthenorm.com/mark-robertson-history-socratic-dialogue/ Perhaps we need more of this?

      Early examples of this sort of note taking can also be seen in the religious studies space with Melanchthon's handbook on commonplaces or Jonathan Edwards' Miscellanies, though missing are the process from notes to writings. https://www.logos.com/grow/jonathan-edwards-organizational-genius/

      Other examples of these practices in the wild include @andy_matuschak's https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DGcs4tyey18 and TheNonPoet's https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_sdp0jo2Fe4 Though it may be better for students to see this in areas in which they're interested.

      Hypothes.is as a potential means of modeling and allowing students to directly "see" this sort of work as it progresses using public/semi-public annotations may be helpful. Then one can separately model re-arranging them and writing a paper. https://web.hypothes.is/

      Reply to: https://twitter.com/BenjaminVanDyne/status/1571171086171095042

  5. Aug 2022
    1. Allosso, Dan, and S. F. Allosso. How to Make Notes and Write. Minnesota State Pressbooks, 2022. https://minnstate.pressbooks.pub/write/.

      Annotatable .pdf copy for Hypothes.is: https://docdrop.org/pdf/How-to-Make-Notes-and-Write---Allosso-Dan-jzdq8.pdf/

      Nota Bene:

      These annotations are of a an early pre-release draft of the text. One ought to download the most recent revised/final/official draft at https://minnstate.pressbooks.pub/write/.

    1. https://minnstate.pressbooks.pub/ushistory1/

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Dan Allosso</span> in Welcome to US History & Primary Source Anthology, vol. 1 (<time class='dt-published'>08/21/2022 14:41:00</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Harris said this model is often better for the textbook authors OpenStax works with, whom Harris called "the long tail" behind the minority of financially successful academic authors -- those who wouldn't necessarily sell enough units to make a lot in royalties, but who are committed to their work nonetheless.
    2. "We are fully committed to providing affordable, high-quality learning solutions for students," Joyner said. "We are excited to think openly and collaboratively with key partners like OpenStax to ensure that we, and our authors, are able to reach as many students as possible in new and highly accessible ways."
    1. Organic chemistry is a required course for pre-medical students and is also one of the most challenging science courses students take.
    2. John sought to publish Organic Chemistry as a free textbook in honor of his son Peter.
  6. Jul 2022
    1. For those curious about the idea of what students might do with the notes and annotations they're making in the margins of their texts using Hypothes.is, I would submit that Dan Allosso's OER handbook How to Make Notes and Write (Minnesota State Pressbooks, 2022) may be a very useful place to turn. https://minnstate.pressbooks.pub/write/

      It provides some concrete advice on the topic of once you've highlighted and annotated various texts for a course, how might you then turn your new understanding, ideas, and extant thinking work into a blogpost, essay, term paper or thesis.

      For a similar, but alternative take, the book How to Take Smart Notes: One Simple Technique to Boost Writing, Learning and Thinking by Sönke Ahrens (Create Space, 2017) may also be helpful as well. This text however requires purchase via Amazon and doesn't carry the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial ShareAlike (by-nc-sa 4.0) license that Dr. Allosso's does.

      In addition to the online copy of the book, there's an annotatable .pdf copy available here: http://docdrop.org/pdf/How-to-Make-Notes-and-Write---Allosso-Dan-jzdq8.pdf/ though one can download .epub and .pdf copies directly from the Pressbooks site.

    1. Educators will need support from their institutions in creating opportunities to develop coherent, transparent, and culturally sustaining instruction and assessment practices, and in recognizing their labor as creators, curators, and facilitators of deeper learning

      It is very important that Institutions at all levels, primary, secondary and higher levels should be trained/up-skilled to implement OERs, however, champions need to be identified to drive an action plan. There are so many opportunities created by the use of OERs that can only benefit us all.

  7. Jun 2022
    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWkwOefBPZY

      Some of the basic outline of this looks like OER (Open Educational Resources) and its "five Rs": Retain, Reuse, Revise, Remix and/or Redistribute content. (To which I've already suggested the sixth: Request update (or revision control).

      Some of this is similar to:

      The Read Write Web is no longer sufficient. I want the Read Fork Write Merge Web. #osb11 lunch table. #diso #indieweb [Tantek Çelik](http://tantek.com/2011/174/t1/read-fork-write-merge-web-osb110

      Idea of collections of learning as collections or "playlists" or "readlists". Similar to the old tool Readlist which bundled articles into books relatively easily. See also: https://boffosocko.com/2022/03/26/indieweb-readlists-tools-and-brainstorming/

      Use of Wiki version histories

      Some of this has the form of a Wiki but with smaller nuggets of information (sort of like Tiddlywiki perhaps, which also allows for creating custom orderings of things which had specific URLs for displaying and sharing them.) The Zettelkasten idea has some of this embedded into it. Shared zettelkasten could be an interesting thing.

      Data is the new soil. A way to reframe "data is the new oil" but as a part of the commons. This fits well into the gardens and streams metaphor.

      Jerry, have you seen Matt Ridley's work on Ideas Have Sex? https://www.ted.com/talks/matt_ridley_when_ideas_have_sex Of course you have: https://app.thebrain.com/brains/3d80058c-14d8-5361-0b61-a061f89baf87/thoughts/3e2c5c75-fc49-0688-f455-6de58e4487f1/attachments/8aab91d4-5fc8-93fe-7850-d6fa828c10a9

      I've heard Jerry mention the idea of "crystallization of knowledge" before. How can we concretely link this version with Cesar Hidalgo's work, esp. Why Information Grows.

      Cross reference Jerry's Brain: https://app.thebrain.com/brains/3d80058c-14d8-5361-0b61-a061f89baf87/thoughts/4bfe6526-9884-4b6d-9548-23659da7811e/notes

  8. May 2022
    1. educación abierta. La participación incluye: la creación, el uso, la adaptación y el mejoramiento de los recursos educacionales abiertos; adoptar practicas educacionales construidas alrededor de la colaboración, el descubrimiento y la creación del conocimiento;

      Educación Abierta: - Usar, Adaptar y Crear REA - Prácticas Colaborativas

    1. Nate Angell as our new Director of Communications and Community.

      Congratulations Nate! I'm sure Hypothes.is will miss you desperately, but Creative Commons will be all the better for your work and contribution.

      https://creativecommons.org/2022/05/03/cc-welcomes-nate-angell/

  9. Apr 2022
    1. A New York Times article uses the same temperature dataset you have been using to investigate the distribution of temperatures and temperature variability over time. Read through the article, paying close attention to the descriptions of the temperature distributions.

      Unfortunately, like most NYT content, this article is behind a paywall. I'm partly reading this as I plan to develop a set of open education resources myself and the problem of how to manage dead/unavailable links looks like a key stumbling block.

  10. Mar 2022
    1. The Open Network Learning Mooc has a focus on using open platforms and Open Education Resources; except for the Adobe Connect Pro software being used for webinars. This model of openness signifies a significant move forward in making education accessible and flexible for all participants.

      I strongly believe in this method of teaching by presenting opportunities to access information, knowledge and education as freely as possible (my main reason is due to the severity of the socio-economic disparities in my learning environment in South Africa). It is important to provide opportunities for all to be able to move out of their circumstances and the best way to do this is through education (if education is accessible).

    1. Existe-t-il un annuaire qui permet de trouver les ressources éducatives libres ? Non, il n’existe pas d’annuaire, ou plutôt il en existe beaucoup et ils sont peu utilisables.
    2. En France, quand on parle de ressources gratuites, la première réaction est souvent : mais ça l’est déjà !
    3. pourquoi les instances publiques exercent un vrai soutien pour l’accès libre aux publications scientifiques et pas de soutien du même ordre pour les REL
    1. finding

      A couple of examples of OER are the BYOD4L open learning event (Bring Your Own Device 4 Learning). This 5-day program features a different theme and activities each day and is licensed CC BY SA https://byod4learning.wordpress.com/

      Also multiple iterations of 23 Digital Things licensed CC BY and remixed by universities and libraries worldwide. One example is https://23things.cdu.edu.au/

  11. Feb 2022
    1. encouraging the integration of different teaching methods and forms of assessment

      And not only encouraging practices directly related to OER, but also other open educational practices that the use of OER can "open" up, such as renewable assignments, authentic assessment, ungrading, etc.

    2. the institutional and national levels

      Maybe we should consider other policy-making levels too, as there are good examples of regional/provincial/state level OER policy, such as in Oregon. What are other examples/levels?

  12. Dec 2021
    1. Ressources éducatives libres

      Une période-charnière pour les REL au Québec:

      1. Pascale Blanc (Vitrine technologie-éducation)
      2. Nicolas Boivin (MOOC Littératie financière – UQTR)
      3. Isabelle Laplante (ÉDUQ)
      4. Robert Gérin-Lajoie (EDUlib – UdeM)
      5. Simon Villeneuve (Cégep de Chicoutimi)
      6. Hugh McGuire (Librivox)
    1. AREAS OF ACTION
      1. Capacity Building
      2. Supportive policy
      3. Inclusion, equity, quality, effectiveness
      4. Sustainability
      5. International cooperation
    1. The foundation of Open Education is Open Educational Resources (OER), which are teaching, learning, and research resources that are free of cost and access barriers, and which also carry legal permission for open use. Generally, this permission is granted by use of an open license (for example, Creative Commons licenses) which allows anyone to freely use, adapt and share the resource—anytime, anywhere. “Open” permissions are typically defined in terms of the “5R’s”: users are free to Retain, Reuse, Revise, Remix and Redistribute these educational materials.
  13. Nov 2021
    1. Though firmly rooted in Renaissance culture, Knight's carefully calibrated arguments also push forward to the digital present—engaging with the modern library archives where these works were rebound and remade, and showing how the custodianship of literary artifacts shapes our canons, chronologies, and contemporary interpretative practices.

      This passage reminds me of a conversation on 2021-11-16 at Liquid Margins with Will T. Monroe (@willtmonroe) about using Sönke Ahrens' book Smart Notes and Hypothes.is as a structure for getting groups of people (compared to Ahrens' focus on a single person) to do collection, curation, and creation of open education resources (OER).

      Here Jeffrey Todd Knight sounds like he's looking at it from the perspective of one (or maybe two) creators in conjunction (curator and binder/publisher) while I'm thinking about expanding behond

      This sort of pattern can also be seen in Mortimer J. Adler's group zettelkasten used to create The Great Books of the Western World series as well in larger wiki-based efforts like Wikipedia, so it's not new, but the question is how a teacher (or other leader) can help to better organize a community of creators around making larger works from smaller pieces. Robin DeRosa's example of using OER in the classroom is another example, but there, the process sounded much more difficult and manual.

      This is the sort of piece that Vannevar Bush completely missed as a mode of creation and research in his conceptualization of the Memex. Perhaps we need the "Inventiex" as a mode of larger group means of "inventio" using these methods in a digital setting?

    1. OER, particularly in indigenous languages

      Made me think of the Indigenization Project at BCCampus, that works "to co-create open educational resources that support faculty and staff with the incorporation of Indigenous epistemologies into professional practice, enabling post-secondary institutions to continue to build the structures and processes by which Indigenous students experience their post-secondary education in resonance with their own lives, worldviews, and ambitions."

      Are there other examples of projects focused on OER in indigenous languages? Love to hear about them in replies to this annotation.

  14. Sep 2021
  15. Aug 2021
    1. Review this chart that details which CC licenses work well for education resources and which do not.

      As @ThatPsychProf put it, it's pretty clear that BY-NC resources can work as OER. Some people disagree, which is fine. There are contexts in which the NC restriction is an important "crutch".

  16. Jul 2021
    1. Allow content created on your site to be shared on a global H5P Hub Done - June 2021 release
    1. OER come in many shapes and forms. For instance, they might come as a full course with lesson plans, lecture notes, readings, assignments, videos, and tests, or they might be a single module, textbook, or syllabus
  17. Jun 2021
  18. May 2021
    1. I like the idea of where Downes is going here in taking a book and turning it into a feed for a course.

      Could professors create a syllabus at the start of the semester and then add things to a main class feed slowly over time in combination with feeds from various students to unroll the course over time?

    2. Books and OER distributed by RSS. OPML lists creating collections for specific purposes - courses, discussion lists, whatever. RSS readers like gRSShopper using these OPML files to aggregate the contents and present them inside the student's own integrated learning environment. And then these - chapters, resources, comments, etc. - shared through the network among people taking the same course, working in the same community, or associated in any other way.

      This is roughly what I'd been thinking when reading Tonz' work on OPML recently as well. OPML could be used for quite a lot more and when paired with dumping things into a reader environment could be incredibly powerful.

    3. Matrix Algebra with Computational Applications e-book offered by Michigan State University. It's a lovely book, and what stood out about it was the way it used PressBooks for distribution as an open e-book, and how it embedded Jupyter Notebook in with the text.

      example of a OER textbook with an embedded Jupyter Notebook. I've wanted to noodle around with this myself.

    1. Cut/Copy/Paste explores the relations between fragments, history, books, and media. It does so by scouting out fringe maker cultures of the seventeenth century, where archives were cut up, “hacked,” and reassembled into new media machines: the Concordance Room at Little Gidding in the 1630s and 1640s, where Mary Collett Ferrar and her family sliced apart printed Bibles and pasted the pieces back together into elaborate collages known as “Harmonies”; the domestic printing atelier of Edward Benlowes, a gentleman poet and Royalist who rode out the Civil Wars by assembling boutique books of poetry; and the nomadic collections of John Bagford, a shoemaker-turned-bookseller who foraged fragments of old manuscripts and title pages from used bookshops to assemble a material history of the book. Working across a century of upheaval, when England was reconsidering its religion and governance, each of these individuals saved the frail, fragile, frangible bits of the past and made from them new constellations of meaning. These fragmented assemblages resist familiar bibliographic and literary categories, slipping between the cracks of disciplines; later institutions like the British Library did not know how to collate or catalogue them, shuffling them between departments of print and manuscript. Yet, brought back together in this hybrid history, their scattered remains witness an emergent early modern poetics of care and curation, grounded in communities of practice. Stitching together new work in book history and media archaeology via digital methods and feminist historiography, Cut/Copy/Paste traces the lives and afterlives of these communities, from their origins in early modern print cultures to the circulation of their work as digital fragments today. In doing so, this project rediscovers the odd book histories of the seventeenth century as a media history with an ethics of material making—one that has much to teach us today.
  19. Apr 2021
    1. Rajiv reminded us that: “Openness can be leveraged for justice, but it can also do harm. Closed practices can also do harm, but there are times when closed is the empowered choice. Choice is key. We must serve justice, rather than merely being open.”
    2. Rajiv cited an example highlighted by tara robertson of an instance where openness raised troubling ethical issues.  When the lesbian porn magazine On Our Backs was digitised and released under CC BY licence, women who had modelled for the magazine felt that work they had created for their own community had been appropriated for uses they had never intended and did not consent to. 

      It can be important when opening content up, especially at higher corporate levels, to take into account future uses of material that might not have been forseen when they were created. This may be especially important with the use of algorithms.

    1. Manifold – Building an Open Source Publishing Platform

      Zach Davis and Matthew Gold

      Re-watching after the conference.

      Manifold

      Use case of showing the process of making the book. The book as a start to finish project rather than just the end product.

      They built the platform while eating their own cooking (or at least doing so with nearby communities).

      Use for this as bookclubs. Embedable audio and video possibilities.

      Use case where people have put journals on the platform and they've grown to add meta data and features to work for that.

      They're allowing people to pull in social media pieces into the platform as well. Perhaps an opportunity to use Webmentions?

      They support epub.

      It can pull in Gutenberg texts.

      Jim Groom talks about the idea of almost using Manifold as an LMS in and of itself. Centering the text as the thing around which we're gathering.

      CUNY Editions of standard e-books with additional resources.Critical editions.

      Using simple tools like Google Docs and then ingest them into Manifold using a YAML file.

      TEI, LaTeX formats and strategies for pulling them in. (Are these actually supported? It wasn't clear.)

      Reclaim Cloud has a container that will run Manifold.

      Zach is a big believer in UX and design as the core of their product.

    1. I love his image of a single open window on a major building with closed windows. And finished with more homey building with all open windows.

      Something was. Then something changed. ---Erin Morgenstern in The Starless Sea p.363 (Apple books edition)

      Ed's 5 Big NOTs of Teaching

      • Knowledge is NOT simply content
      • A textbook is NOT the only perspective
      • A course is NOT an isolated context
      • The teacher is NOT the sole authority
      • Students are NOT empty vessels

      Hegarty's 8 Attributes of Open Pedagogy (see reference below, which I'd like to read).

      "OER requires an extra amount of effort and time." ---Ed Nagelhout

      "It was you, me, and Mike Caulfield." - Jim Groom (Don't we all wish we could say this...)

      I'd watched this live during the conference, but with morning duties, it was definitely worth watching again, especially for the student project diagrams at the end.

      References:

      • Brandt, D. (2011). Literacy as involvement: The acts of writers, readers, and texts. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.
      • Cushman, E., Kintgen, E. R., Kroll, B., & Rose, M. (2001). Literacy: A critical sourcebook. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s.
      • Hegarty, B. (2015). “Attributes of Open Pedagogy: A Model for Using Open Educational Resources.” Educational Technology, pp. 3-13. Available at: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/ca/Ed_Tech_Hegarty_2015_article_attributes_of_open_pedagogy.pdf
      • Selber, S. A. (2004). Multiliteracies for a digital age. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.
    1. n Rebecca Elinich

      The content of Elinich’s course on VR through UE and Unity is available on OER Commons.

      What if UE4 and Unity assets were made available as OER?

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Katharina Schulz</span> in domains21 (<time class='dt-published'>04/19/2021 18:33:31</time>)</cite></small>

    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>friedelitis</span> in domains21 (<time class='dt-published'>04/19/2021 18:33:31</time>)</cite></small>

    1. what's happening at the college level which is a bit different than at the university level

      Another important point. Our college-based network is leading some OER initiatives, these days. Partly because our needs are quite specific. Most of the OER scene focuses on universities (or merges colleges and universities, since they are very similar in some contexts).

    2. a French institution is kind of interested in terms of sharing materials and open educational materials because there's way less opportunities for us to work with publisher materials there's just not the same amount of resources out there

      One key hunch about differences between language communities.

    1. As part of a survey consultation of the UMSU membership, “adoption of free digital textbooks” arose as students’ highest-ranked priority for increased spending by the U of M, ahead of more than a dozen other options, including increased mental health supports and work-learn placements.

      Great to know that students have this as a priority!

  20. Mar 2021
    1. Celebrating

      Some OER creators may have skipped that important step. It's important to celebrate accomplishments, especially in “agile methodologies”. What makes it even more important with OERs is that promoting the work is an integral part of the work itself. Plus, a team which is able to celebrate its accomplishment is likely to lead to new accomplishments.

    1. I've also invited (that is assigned) students to participate in knowledge creation in the graph by adding content to fill "blank nodes" I've made as I've been inserting my content. They can choose which keywords or subtopics they want to learn a little more about, do a bit of research, write a summary that will be useful to their fellow students, and cite their sources.

      This exercise also makes it more apparent to students that their work and research can go on to make improvements to the field in general. Writing papers in college is a dreadful exercise for students who often don't see the point. While this may be like learning bowling with the gutter rails raised, it certainly helps bridge the gap many students may have.

      The added benefit is that they might see their work live on in a textbook they may have used and in which they now have a credit.

    2. In the next Learning Circle, I wrote a US History II textbook, adapted from The American Yawp. This was my first experience "Remixing" an existing CC-licensed OER. I think I took a step to making it my own and shifting its focus from what I considered a slightly consensus-driven and slightly political-correctness agenda to a more direct focus on some of the inequalities and injustices that the political correctness is belatedly trying to address. I think once I've reworked it one or two more times, using it in my courses and altering it gradually over a few semesters, it will probably be ready for publication as a "new" thing, although I'll continue to cite the original authors and point out that I'm in dialog with the previous work they did. I think this is how most textbooks are made, but like everything else, I want it to be very visible.

      This is an excellent example of an OER textbook being actively reimagined. I often see people writing about how it works, but haven't seen many cases of people writing about actively doing it.

    3. I hadn't really thought that much about the pedagogical aspects (they don't really teach PhD historians pedagogy where I went to school, or I missed it somehow, so I've been trying to educate myself since then).

      Don't feel bad, I don't think many (any?!) programs do this. It's a terrible disservice to academia.

      Examples of programs that do this would be fantastic to have. Or even an Open Education based course that covers some of this would be an awesome thing to see.

    4. I decided I'd make my content available with a CC BY-NC-SA (Attribution, Non-commercial, Share Alike) license, so that people could freely use and adapt my stuff, but would need to cite me as its source, make their content that was based on my work available for free, and slap a similar license on it. This is important, I think, to prevent the materials that educators make and contribute freely to the community STAY FREE. Without these stipulations (NC and SA), it would be possible for a commercial textbook company, for example, to grab the content I've created and add it to their "walled garden" of content which is technically free, but requires an expensive subscription to GET TO. This is a subversion of the Open idea which a lot of commercial publishers have tried, to reduce their cost of content and make themselves seem hip and up to date. The community calls it Openwashing.

      A good description of openwashing. I've seen some examples of the practice in the wild, but should make a note to document some.

    5. I began joining Minnesota State's OER Learning Circles, developed by Karen Pikula.

      This line is screaming out for some linked resources to follow up on.

      These look like good potential starts.

    6. Books had already been ordered and many of the students had purchased a $150 textbook and a $50 primary source companion. I adapted the lectures I had designed the previous semester, to align them with the new textbook I was using. As I was doing this, I had the opportunity to reflect on the ways that these textbooks were very similar in their skeletal structure, with really just a few details and stylistic differences. I became curious, and looked at several more Modern World textbooks, old and new. It occurred to me that I wasn't entirely happy, charging 75 students $200 each (that’s $15,000!) for textbook content that they would have paid $5 on, if the professor had chosen the previous edition of the textbook (assuming all the students could have FOUND one to buy).

      This! This is the piece of the puzzle that so very few teachers even bother to think about. Perhaps they're stuck with so much other work they either go with what they know, have used before, or are simply sold to them by textbook sales representatives.

      This pattern has concerned me for a long time.

      More:

    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>chrisaldrich</span> in From Print to OER Ebook to Obsidian (Hypothesis annotation) (<time class='dt-published'>03/15/2021 10:45:30</time>)</cite></small>

    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>chrisaldrich</span> in From Print to OER Ebook to Obsidian (Hypothesis annotation) (<time class='dt-published'>03/15/2021 10:45:30</time>)</cite></small>

  21. Feb 2021
    1. When your digital news feed doesn’t contain links, when it cannot be linked to, when it can’t be indexed, when you can’t copy a paragraph and paste it into another application: when this happens your news feed is not flawed or backwards looking or frustrating. It is broken.

      If your news feed doesn't contain links, can't be linked to, indexed, or copied and pasted, it is broken.

      How can this be tied into the five R's of Open Education Resources: Retain, Reuse, Revise, Remix and/or Redistribute content (and perhaps my Revise/Request update ideas: https://boffosocko.com/2018/08/30/the-sixth-r-of-open-educational-resources-oer/)

    1. Free, Open, Online: Rethinking Learning Materials Online (Slidecast)

      Packaging some of my early material on what we now call OER, Open Educational Resources.

    1. Free, Open, Flexible: Rethinking Learning Materials Online

      One of my early sessions on Open Education, with an emphasis on leveraging the material we create in the course of our work.

  22. Jan 2021
    1. Using wiki to create a learning community for chemistry teacher leaders

      Professors attitude to wikis and how opinions differ between demographics. Correlation between teachers' personal participation rate in the wiki environment and their perception of classrooms as student centered or teacher controlled

    1. Integration of open educational resources in undergraduate chemistry teaching – a mapping tool and lecturers' considerations

      evaluation of open educational resources, questionnaires and interviews of chem lecturers, lecturers interviewed tended to select OER intuitively, mainly considering the reliability of information, pedagogical issues and the visual contribution, while paying less attention to collaborative learning and content sharing.

  23. Nov 2020
    1. Start a class by outlining the syllabus or the chapters of the textbook. Professors who decide to write their text books as they go with the students. Publish the result as OER. It’d be fun to see some examples of that.

      Robin DeRosa did something like this that serves as a good example: https://robinderosa.net/uncategorized/my-open-textbook-pedagogy-and-practice/

  24. Oct 2020
    1. Perspectives:An Open Invitation to Cultural Anthropology2nd Edition The first peer-reviewed open access textbook for cultural anthropology courses. Produced by the Society for Anthropology in Community Colleges and available free of charge for use in any setting.
    1. As an example, Dr. Ng adapted this activity, originally written as an individual project, to a short in-class activity for teams

      Nice example of remixing an OER (via Lumen)

    1. Students like the convenience of the system, said Anderson, and all have access to the most up-to-date content, instead of some students having different editions of the same textbook.

      They're also touting the most up-to-date content here, when it's an open secret that for the majority of textbooks don't really change that much from edition to edition.

    2. A key difference between inclusive access and buying print textbooks is that students effectively lease the content for the duration of their course, rather than owning the material. If students want to download the content to access it beyond the duration of their course, there is often an additional fee.

      So now we need to revisit the calculation above and put this new piece of data into the model.

      Seriously?! It's now a "rental price"?

    3. She said that her institution, which has inclusive-access agreements with more than 25 publishers, had saved students more than $2 million this semester alone.

      $ 2million compared to what? To everyone having purchased the textbooks at going rates before? This is a false comparison because not everyone bought new in the first place. Many bought used, and many more still probably either pirated, borrowed from a friend, from the library, or simply went without.

    1. working in public, and asking students to work in public, is fraught with dangers and challenges.
    2. If OER is free, what hidden costs exist in its production? Making these textbooks is taking me a chunk of time in the off-season.  Thanks to my salaried position, I feel ok about putting in the overtime, but it’s a privilege my colleagues who teach under year-to-year part-time non-contracts can’t afford. Who should be funding OER creation? Institutions? Students? For-profit start-ups? How will you invest time in this project without obscuring the true costs of academic labor? Right now, we pass the corruptly high cost of academic publishing onto the backs of academia’s most vulnerable members: students. But as OER gains steam, we need to come up with funding models that don’t land us back in the same quagmire of exploitation that we were trying to get out of.

      This is a nearly perfect question and something to watch in the coming years.

    3. Most of the actual texts in the Heath were public domain texts, freely available and not under any copyright restrictions.  As the Heath produced new editions (of literature from roughly 1400-1800!), forcing students to buy new textbooks or be irritatingly out of sync with page numbers, and as students turned to rental markets that necessitated them giving their books back at the end of the semester, I began to look in earnest for an alternative.

      Repackaging public domain texts and charging a steep markup too much above and beyond the cost of the paper is just highway robbery. Unless a publisher is adding some actual annotative or analytical value, they shouldn't be charging outrageous prices for textbooks of this nature.