42 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2022
    1. Meme wars are culture wars, the authors write — “accelerated and intensified because of the infrastructure and incentives of the internet, which trades outrage and extremity as currency, rewards speed and scale, and flatten the experience of the world into a never-ending scroll of images and words.”
  2. Oct 2022
  3. Sep 2022
    1. We observed an overall increase in the amount of negative information as it passed along the chain—known as the social amplification of risk.

      Could this be linked to my FUD thesis about decisions based on possibilities rather than realities?

    2. social diffusion also makes negative information more “sticky.”
    3. This winner-take-all popularity pattern of memes, in which most are barely noticed while a few spread widely, could not be explained by some of them being more catchy or somehow more valuable: the memes in this simulated world had no intrinsic quality. Virality resulted purely from the statistical consequences of information proliferation in a social network of agents with limited attention.
    4. “Limited individual attention and online virality of low-quality information,” By Xiaoyan Qiu et al., in Nature Human Behaviour, Vol. 1, June 2017

      The upshot of this paper seems to be "information overload alone can explain why fake news can become viral."

    5. Running this simulation over many time steps, Lilian Weng of OSoMe found that as agents' attention became increasingly limited, the propagation of memes came to reflect the power-law distribution of actual social media: the probability that a meme would be shared a given number of times was roughly an inverse power of that number. For example, the likelihood of a meme being shared three times was approximately nine times less than that of its being shared once.
    1. . Just as genes propagate themselvesin the gene pool by leaping from body to body via sperms or eggs, somemes propagate themselves in the meme pool by leaping from brainto brain via a process which, in the broad sense can be called imitation.

      Having grown up in the age of modern technology, it is quite simple to understand the notion of memes that Dawkins presents in comparison to the common memes of the current digital era. When given the right audience and shared in the right social situations, memes can spread like wildfire. Oftentimes memes and their respective ideas will reach a tipping point (as defined by Malcolm Gladwell) and spike in popularity then eventually die out. I find fairy tales interesting in the sense that, compared to other trends and memes, they have not one short life of recognition but many spread over the course of generations.

  4. Aug 2022
    1. The vibe shift concept has more or less dissipated into meaninglessness, but it originated as an acute collective sense that something suddenly felt different in early summer 2021, following widespread vaccination and the world reopening. The preceding pandemic year had been a time of unprecedented digital immersion. With less material to draw upon from the outside world, we frantically generated content about content. Memes evolved at an accelerated rate, all the more recursive because they were all we had. At the time, this didn’t even feel strange, because it was the mere culmination of what we’d been building toward for the prior decade, and we were already acclimated. 2020 put the finishing touches on that process of rewiring our brains for social media, fully orienting us toward a world where everything is content and potential raw material for memes and discourse
    1. The network of trails functions as a shared external memory for the ant colony.

      Just as a trail of pheromones serves the function of a shared external memory for an ant colony, annotations can create a set of associative trails which serve as an external memory for a broader human collective memory. Further songlines and other orality based memory methods form a shared, but individually stored internal collective memory for those who use and practice them.

      Vestiges of this human practice can be seen in modern society with the use and spread of cultural memes. People are incredibly good at seeing and recognizing memes and what they communicate and spreading them because they've evolved to function this way since the dawn of humanity.

  5. Jul 2022
    1. This may be partly because political memes invariably flatten political and ethical complexity into binary narratives of good and evil. They are cast as profound moral statements signaling allegiance to the in-group, and so they are meant to attract approval (likes, reshares, and praise) not discussion or objections.
    2. People get strangely protective of memes, and become much more defensive when challenged than if an op-ed they’ve shared is disputed. Longer form communications seem to be open to rigorous but respectful debate in ways that memes are not. It doesn’t appear to matter whether one attempts to debate the content of the meme itself, or the practice of sharing memes—criticizing a meme can feel tantamount to insulting someone’s child.
    3. Most academics who study memes agree that they are poisonous to healthy public discourse (“toxic” is a word that crops up a lot, even in the scholarly literature). One scholar bluntly called them “one of the main vehicles for misinformation,” and they tend to distort reality in several ways. By their very nature, they leave no room for nuance or complexity, and so they are frequently misleading; they tend to lean heavily on scornful condescension and moral sanctimony (usually, the intended takeaway is that anyone who agrees with the point of view being—inaccurately—mocked is an imbecile); they make copious use of ad hominem attacks, straw man fallacies, and motte-and-bailey arguments; they intentionally catastrophize, generalize, personalize, and encourage dichotomous thinking; and they are aggressive and sometimes dehumanizing. They are, in other words, methods of Internet communication that display all the symptoms of a borderline personality type of mental disorder. Of course, it’s possible to construct a meme that is short yet still thoughtful and sophisticated, but these are few and far between.
  6. Jun 2022
    1. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1N4LYLwa2lSq9BizDaJDimOsWY83UMFqqQc1iL2KEpfY/edit

      P.R.O.B.E. rubric participation (exceeds, meets fails), respectful, open, brave, educational

      Mentioned in the chat at Hypothes.is' SOCIAL LEARNING SUMMIT: Spotlight on Social Reading & Social Annotation

      in the session on Bringing the Margins to Center: Introduction to Social Annotation


      Looking at the idea of rubrication, I feel like I ought to build a Tampermonkey or Greasemonkey script that takes initial capitals on paragraphs and makes them large, red, or even illuminated. Or perhaps something that converts the CSS of Hypothes.is and makes it red instead of yellow?

      What if we had a collection of illuminated initials and some code that would allow for replacing capitals at the start of paragraphs? Maybe a repository like giphy or some of the meme and photo collections for reuse?

  7. May 2022
  8. Apr 2022
    1. the ice pick technique was only championed by one enthusiast physician, Walter Freeman, and was roundly decried by other psychiatrists at the time.

      The psychiatric use of an ice pick for lobotomies was proposed by physician Walter Freeman, but the idea was roundly decried by other psychiatrists of the time.

      Was the shock of the method what drove it into popular culture so solidly?

  9. Jan 2022
  10. Sep 2021
  11. Aug 2021
    1. Have you ever … In December 2008, I came across this post from someone who was on my blogroll, or in my feeds, or something. They listed 100 things that one might have done in one’s life, and invited one to indicate those that one had actually done. I took the challenge on as a lark and then decided that the same list could prompt individual blog posts, so I started doing that.2 And now I’m resurrecting the meme, and tagging Amanda Rush and ladyhope. I hope they will participate, link to this, and tag two more people.3 Of course, if you are inspired to do it too, then just go ahead.

      There's something here that sounds like the idea of a friendship book, but in online/blog form.

      It's also a bit reminiscent of a social startup in the late 00s called Formspring.me.

      Everything old is new again?

  12. Jul 2021
  13. Apr 2021
  14. Feb 2021
  15. Nov 2020
    1. There is still a chance for us to escape such an unreal existence, but it will require us to stop assuaging our pain and hiding our apathy with satirical memes. It will require a determined pursuit of moral wholeness and a holistic respect for humanity and all human life, including the babies.

      Lindo..........

  16. Oct 2020
    1. Meme creators and posters have been sued for using people’s images without permission, especially those who were not already public figures. In 2003, the parents of the unwilling star of the “Star Wars Kid” video sued their son’s classmates for posting the video online. Though the suit was settled, the video did not disappear, and the Star Wars Kid learned to deal with his fame.

      It is interesting to see examples of simple actions that can have dire consequences with the law.

    1. Somewhere along the last decade, he added, YouTube prioritized chasing profits over the safety of its users. “We may have been hemorrhaging money,” he said. “But at least dogs riding skateboards never killed anyone.”
    1. Come on, harvest me! I’ll just change your world some more.

      I wonder a bit here about the idea of what in a meme might have a substrate type of effect to decrease the overall energy of the process to help it take off.

    2. I enjoyed Harari’s application of meme theory to the agrarian revolution of circa 10,000 BCE: it may have seemed like a giant leap for mankind, but imagine if you are wheat. As a species, you have conquered the world. Come on and harvest me! I will just spread further.

      I wonder if he credits this idea elsewhere. I've heard this exact type of argument about corn before in the past. (Perhaps Jared Diamond or David Christian? Possibly via Richard Dawkins, though less likely.)

    1. By the way, just to get back to notational bias for a sec, the term “dark pattern” is problematic for reasons that should be clear if you think about it for a minute or two so let’s collectively start working on better language for that. Mmmmkay?

      Subtle reference to Mr. Mackey from the television show South Park here:

      <div>from Imgflip Meme Generator</div>

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  17. Sep 2020
  18. Mar 2020
    1. Leg.

      Just kidding. This is an AWESOME video! Very funny and wonderfully simple animation :)

  19. Aug 2019
    1. Divergent responses to annotation demonstrate what Foucault means by power running through the whole social body.

      How would this have worked in pre-literate societies? Examples?

      "the whole social body" also reminds me of the idea of the "Great Chain of Being" to consider how differences in annotation may change and evolve in societies over long periods of time. I can't help but consider Richard Dawkins' original conceptualization of the "meme" and how they move through societies with or without literacy skills.

  20. Jul 2019
    1. a label will inform the program “this is a cat,” and not a cheeseburger - despite some visual similarity and the former perhaps having the latter.

      This is the label you were hoping someone would put on this right?

      Image courtesy of icanhascheeseburger.

  21. Sep 2018
    1. Although there are plenty of theories which could all be modelled, because the extant theory is so heavily based on assumptions which would have to be built into the models to make them work, they could all show interesting results which are, however, devoid of any resemblance to how culture actually happens

      Too many theories but enough agreed upon assumptions to create a model that could actually be applied nor a model that would accurately represent some aspect of reality.

    2. The resulting materialistic theory of consciousness2, where a „pandemonium‟ of various thoughts and nerve impulses struggle for expression, posits that what we comprehend as a serial stream of consciousness is actually a retrospectively experienced stream of narrative which was subject to continual editing as the various areas of the brain made their contributions.

      There is no photogrpahic memory for most people; every memory is being continuously edited in the mind,

    3. Rather, it is the usual practice to selectively pick examples from culture to help illustrate how memes may work and therefore convenient memes tend to be invoked to help description rather than candidates for real memes discovered in their cultural settings

      Only pragmatic examples

  22. Jul 2018
    1. The scene could come right out of today’s Blue Lives Matter meme factory. Along with images of warriors, weapons, and German shepherds, pictures of children—often little blond girls—hugging cops infuse the movement with an ominous sentimentalism.
  23. Mar 2018
  24. Feb 2017
    1. Potential of memes

      I found this part of the discussion to be rather interesting. I never thought of something like memes as being entry points into Elit--perhaps because they seem too "simplistic." But, if interacting with Elit has taught me anything, it's that it's made to be accessible. So, maybe it's whatever works, huh?

  25. Dec 2016
    1. This Digital History page about Political Cartoons is a great starting point for students of various comprehension and familiarity levels with the sub-topic within social studies / the study of popular culture of political cartoons. Each link takes students to simple definitions of "how to do history through political cartoons", "inquiry questions" and the "background of political cartoons" so students can familiarize themselves with them. At the end, students can link to some of the most popular ones throughout history, mostly created by Harpers Bizzare. Creating an assignment in which students analyze and create political cartoons from the past then political memes from the present would be an exciting way to show the ways in which politics have been examined through popular culture overtime.

  26. Dec 2015