13 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2022
    1. Compass Points, a routine for examining propositions.

      via https://pz.harvard.edu/sites/default/files/Compass%20Points_0.pdf

      • E- excited
      • W- worrisome
      • N - need to know
      • S - stance or suggestion for moving forward

      These could be used as a simple set of rules for thumb for evaluating and expanding on ideas in note taking or social annotation settings.

      Compare these with the suggestions of Tiago Forte in his book Building a Second Brain. Which is better? More comprehensive? Are there any ideas missing in a broader conceptualization? Is there a better acronymization or analogy for such a technique?

    1. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1N4LYLwa2lSq9BizDaJDimOsWY83UMFqqQc1iL2KEpfY/edit

      P.R.O.B.E. rubric participation (exceeds, meets fails), respectful, open, brave, educational

      Mentioned in the chat at Hypothes.is' SOCIAL LEARNING SUMMIT: Spotlight on Social Reading & Social Annotation

      in the session on Bringing the Margins to Center: Introduction to Social Annotation


      Looking at the idea of rubrication, I feel like I ought to build a Tampermonkey or Greasemonkey script that takes initial capitals on paragraphs and makes them large, red, or even illuminated. Or perhaps something that converts the CSS of Hypothes.is and makes it red instead of yellow?

      What if we had a collection of illuminated initials and some code that would allow for replacing capitals at the start of paragraphs? Maybe a repository like giphy or some of the meme and photo collections for reuse?

  2. Jan 2022
  3. Dec 2021
    1. Once we introduce evaluation into our learning spaces, we change the way we interact with student work.

      Evaluation is not the same as feedback. Evaluation is almost always directed at unsolicited advice. Feedback may praise or criticize, but usually seeks value in something.

  4. Apr 2021
    1. humane in a way standardized teacher-centered rubrics usually are not

      Interesting implication about rubrics. Advocates do find them humane. Yet it's probably fair to say that not all rubrics appear humane to those who are submitted to them.

  5. Oct 2020
    1. Too often, rubrics are tools for measurement more than guidance, and they are more prescriptive than aspirational.

      "Too often" is interesting here. It leaves the door open for rubrics which do provide guidance and aspirational goals. That's an intriguing challenge.

    1. portfolio rubric

      Does a rubric still create the same sense of arbitrariness, though? That's been one of my main challenges of ungrading:

      • how to not shift the burden of the responsibility of judgment from me to my students?
      • how to avoid rubrics that simply re-inscribe the values I'm trying to eschew?
  6. Jul 2020
  7. Mar 2020
  8. Jan 2019
    1. A Rubric for Evaluating E-Learning Tools in Higher Education

      The Rubric for E-Learning Tool Evaluation offers educators a framework, with criteria and levels of achievement, to assess the suitability of an e-learning tool for their learners' needs and for their own learning outcomes and classroom context.

  9. Aug 2018
    1. Patreon Engineering Levels

      Engineering focus, but a very detailed rubric of how to rank different personnel levels. Could maybe be generalized/adapted for other fields.

  10. Oct 2015