23 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2022
    1. Natalie @natalie@hcommons.social Follow @chrisaldrichoh wow, your website is mind-blowing! i have to check this out in detail. This is what I hope my future (social) media presence is going to look like one day.A question about syndicating your posts: What happens to the syndicated copies of a post after deleting it?.. my ideal would be: I have full control over my contributions. Probably an illusion? November 27, 2022 at 1:59 AM

      https://hcommons.social/@natalie/109415180134582494

  2. Oct 2022
    1. now we need a much needed and truer history of zetelcaston and thankfully Chris aldricks is the person to provide us that

      We need a much needed and truer history of zettelkasten and thankfully Chris Aldrich is the person to provide us that. Stop reading all those other zettelkasten articles until you have a broader understanding of the historical perspective of where all this came from. I can't tell you how much I learned. There was more I didn't know than I did know by a... and it wasn't even close. So thank you Chris. You definitely need to read The Two Definitions of Zettelkasten.<br /> —Nick Milo, Linking Your Thinking, 2022-10-26,

  3. Aug 2022
    1. German publishers send out so-called book cards to book shops along with their newreleases. On them, bibliographic information is printed. Those book cards are also in postcardsize, i.e. A6, and their textual structure allows for them to be included in the reference filebox.

      Automatic reference cards!

      When did they stop doing this!!!

    1. Chris Aldrich 00:02:33 um like oh yeah you know the most familiar to you yeah yeah and and he's yeah that guy is uh brilliant if you want to know the the ins and outs and deep history of note taking note-taking and even Beyond commonplace books going 00:02:47 back to the 15th century yeah

      That guy is brilliant!

      https://youtu.be/YiTHxQrFnxI?t=150

      <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/YiTHxQrFnxI" title="YouTube video player" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    1. Chris Aldrichs Blog ist sehr gefährlich, denn, wenn man einmal darin zu lesen angefangen hat, dann kommt man so schnell nicht mehr davon los. Ich selbst wurde durch einen bestimmten Beitrag angelockt und ertappe mich jetzt immer wieder dabei, dass ich durch sämtliche Beiträge und Pages seines Blogs stöbere. Er selbst nutzt sein Weblog wie folgt: I use this website as my primary hub for online identity and communication. It’s also my online commonplace book. Schon alleine damit ist geklärt, warum man so viele Dinge dort entdecken kann.  Ich komme auf alle Fälle weiterhin regelmäßig dort vorbei und einen seiner Feeds -- alle wären wohl nicht zu händeln -- habe ich in meinem Reader übernommen.

      https://kuemmerle.name/foren/topic/chris-aldrich#postid-148

      Google Translate:

      Chris Aldrich 's blog is very dangerous because once you start reading it, it's hard to get off. I myself was lured by a certain post and now find myself rummaging through all the posts and pages on his blog.

      He himself uses his weblog as follows:

      I use this website as my primary hub for online identity and communication. It's also my online common place book.

      That alone explains why you can discover so many things there. In any case, I continue to visit there regularly and I have adopted one of his feeds -- all of them would probably not be manageable -- in my reader.

  4. Jun 2022
    1. I owe a big thank you to Chris Aldrich too. As it was his website I came across that inspired me to bring my website back to what I have always wanted it to be. Hopefully, thanks to the indieweb helper plugins I have installed, Chris may just get notified on his website and post a reply back — from his website over to mine using the webmention protocol.

      :)

    1. The phrase "now you're coking with gas" was coined by American Gas Association publicist Carroll Everard "Deke" Houlgate. Deke's son indicated that his father "planted it with Bob Hope's writers" and it was ultimately used in one of his radio shows. From there it turned into one of his catchphrases and it was adopted by others including The Jack Benny Program and Maxwell House Coffee Time.

      Incidentally, Houlgate was also a football journalist who devised the first college football rankings methodology that determined the national champions from 1929 to 1958.

      Is this the same Houlgate, or perhaps his son who played for USC Trojans in the 1931 and 1932 Rose Bowl games?

      References: (see also and check...) - A Way With Words co-host Martha Barnette https://soundcloud.com/waywordradio/now-youre-cooking-with-gas

  5. May 2022
    1. What did Franklin himself think about abortions? In 1728 during his early years as a printer, he generated controversy over something he would end up doing himself. According to “Benjamin Franklin: An American Life” by Walter Isaacson, he “manufactured” an abortion debate, largely because he wanted to crush a rival, but his own opinions may not have been too strong about it. Franklin wrote a series of anonymous letters for another paper to draw attention away from Samuel Keimer’s paper: The first two pieces were attacks on poor Keimer, who was serializing entries from an encyclopedia. His initial installment included, innocently enough, an entry on abortion. Franklin pounced. Using the pen names “Martha Careful” and “Celia Shortface,” he wrote letters to Bradford’s paper feigning shock and indignation at Keimer’s offense. As Miss Careful threatened, “If he proceeds farther to expose the secrets of our sex in that audacious manner [women would] run the hazard of taking him by the beard in the next place we meet him.” Thus Franklin manufactured the first recorded abortion debate in America, not because he had any strong feelings on the issue, but because he knew it would help sell newspapers.

      Benjamin Franklin manufactured the first recorded abortion debate in America to help sell his newspapers and to crush a rival.

  6. Apr 2022
    1. (7) ReconfigBehSci on Twitter: “@ToddHorowitz3 probably- and I think there are many interesting questions around why he is there and whether he should be there. But to answer those properly, looking at the performance of the model seems important and interesting to me- that is all I am saying” / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved March 6, 2021, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1324389147050569734

  7. Jan 2022
    1. Controversy kills. Or, anyway, life is too short, the times too weird, and profit too fleeting, to suffer for it.

      Just a few years ago the prior Hollywood and publishing marketing maxim had been "any publicity is good publicity."

  8. Jul 2021
  9. Dec 2020
    1. My high school English teacher used to say, “Image evokes emotion.” Convey a powerful enough image or idea (and make it vague enough) and people will project onto it what they will. This is the heart of many a savvy PR strategy
  10. Oct 2020
    1. If you look long enough you can find my early terrible writing. You can find blog posts in which I am an idiot. I’ve had a lot of uninformed and passionate opinions on geopolitical issues from Ireland to Israel. You can find tweets I thought were witty, but think are stupid now. You can find opinions I still hold that you disagree with. I’m going to leave most of that stuff up. In doing so, I’m telling you that you have to look for context if you are seeking to understand me. You don’t have to try, I’m not particularly important, but I am complicated. When I die, I’m going to instruct my executors to burn nothing. Leave the crap there, because it’s part of my journey, and that journey has a value. People who came from where I did, and who were given the thoughts I was given, should know that the future can be different from the past.
    1. A friend of mine asked if I’d thought through the contradiction of criticizing Blair publicly like this, when she’s another not-quite public figure too.

      Did this really happen? Or is the author inventing it to diffuse potential criticism as she's writing about the same story herself and only helping to propagate it?

      There's definitely a need to write about this issue, so kudos for that. Ella also deftly leaves out the name of the mystery woman, I'm sure on purpose. But she does include enough breadcrumbs to make the rest of the story discover-able so that one could jump from here to participate in the piling on. I do appreciate that it doesn't appear that she's given Blair any links in the process, which for a story like this is some subtle internet shade.

  11. Sep 2020
  12. Jan 2020
  13. Oct 2019
    1. The annual festival, which takes place this Saturday, has grown to become one of the city's largest events, attracting about 100,000 people to the streets of Eastwood. Organisers say it is second only to the Royal Easter Show.

      Oooh yeah, so big that if a self-serving politician didn't convince you to regurgitate this story (to divert attention from a historical failure) the best coverage it could have enjoyed in the SMH would have been a reference in one of your crossword puzzle! In the end Granny Smith got some great free publicity, and the narcissistic politician who made sure you (and your readers) missed half the story, would be happy you saved them from being reminded about another of their many failed campaigns.

  14. Feb 2019
    1. But I think the secret is that somebody else does his flow for him. I mean, what are PR and advertising but flow, bought and paid for?
  15. Feb 2017
    1. The Streisand effect, then, describes the phenomenon in which efforts to conceal or censor information only drive more attention to it.

      Well known effect.

  16. Feb 2014
    1. Like most subjects, intellectual property has grey zones on the periphery, such as the right to publicity -- whether, in property style, someone can control his public image.

      Right to publicity