117 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2024
  2. Apr 2024
  3. Feb 2024
    1. Shall find it–being grown perfect–in himself. Believing, he receives it when the soul Masters itself, and cleaves to Truth, and comes– Possessing knowledge–to the higher peace,

      Arjuna struggles with moral decisions while serving his country. Jnana Yoga, often known as the "Yoga of Knowledge," is a highly profound kind of yoga that emphasizes realizing one's own transience and pursuing self-realization. Arjuna's journey through this Yoga illustrates the transformational potential of knowledge by serving as a metaphor for the seeker's journey towards enlightenment. In the face of adversity facing the challenges of line ones Dharma must still be fulfilled. This understanding reveals the moral and ethical beliefs Hindu philosophies operated by. Nonetheless philosophy like this can be applied to our own lives. Regardless of the mountain present in front of us, it is important that we seek and fulfill our life's purpose. .

    1. ou wicked women, cease from juggling lies. You want your men. But what of them as well? They toss as sleepless in the lonely night, I’m sure of it. Hold out awhile, hold out, But persevere a teeny-weeny longer. An oracle has promised Victory

      By refusing sexual connection,  Lysistrata directs an unconventional attempt among women to put a stop to the Peloponnesian War. Lysistrata threatens gender norms by making us wonder who actually holds the power and what happens when the conventional is no longer seen as such. Consider the possible disruption of existing power systems and the social consequences of her scheme in a time period such as this where men obtained what seems as totalitarian power in comparison to woman.

  4. Jan 2024
    1. Zusammenfassender Artikel über Studien zu Klimafolgen in der Antarktis und zu dafür relevanten Ereignissen. 2023 sind Entwicklungen sichtbar geworden, die erst für wesentlich später in diesem Jahrhundert erwartet worden waren. Der enorme und möglicherweise dauerhafte Verlust an Merreis ist dafür genauso relevant wie die zunehmende Instabilität des westantarktischen und möglicherweise inzwischen auch des ostantarktischen Eisschilds. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2023/dec/31/red-alert-in-antarctica-the-year-rapid-dramatic-change-hit-climate-scientists-like-a-punch-in-the-guts

  5. Nov 2023
  6. Oct 2023
    1. Water immobilization is a cool thing! The simplest way to accomplish it is by freezing. But can you think of how water might be immobilized (so to speak) at temperatures above freezing, say at 50°F (10°C)? Think Jell-O and a new process that mimics caviar and you have two methods that nearly stop water in its tracks.

      I learned that science and cooking is always connected. Even if we don't think about it in every day life like when water evaporates or freezes it is chemistry. But what I found most interesting that I learned is how water immobilization works, or to put it more simply the science behind Jell-O. When you add gelatin to water it traps the water molecules in place which creates the sort of liquid and solid hybrid we find with Jell-O.

  7. Sep 2023
    1. the closing at the beginning of this year of the last paper mill in the U.S. that produced high-quality literary opaque paper.

      via David Cloyce Smith

    2. the number of *American* printers that can print large books has decreased by two—bankruptcies, both of them. In fact, there are only two firms remaining in the U.S. that both have the presses to print on thin (30# to 40#) paper *and* that can do sewn bindings of books of 1,200 pages or more.
  8. Jul 2023
  9. Jun 2023
  10. Apr 2023
    1. The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) has acquired the MIT Press colophon, designed by Muriel Cooper, as part of its permanent collection. Designed in 1965 and now widely celebrated as a hallmark of modernist design, the iconic logo was abstracted from the letters “mitp” into the barcode-resembling design that stamps the spines of the press’s publications.

      Muriel Cooper, the first design director of the MIT Press and a founding faculty member of MIT's Media Lab, designed the MIT Press colophon in 1965. The iconic colophon has been acquired by The Museum of Modern Art in 2023.

      The commission had originally been offered to Paul Rand (o Eye Bee M logo fame) in 1962, but when he turned down the offer, he suggested they offer it to Cooper.

    1. Lying press (German: Lügenpresse, lit. 'press of lies') is a pejorative and disparaging political term used largely for the printed press and the mass media at large. It is used as an essential part of propaganda and is thus usually dishonest or at least not based on careful research.
  11. Feb 2023
    1. “...it can be very useful for coming up with ideas out of thin air, essentially. All you need is a little bit of seed text, maybe some notes on a story you've been thinking about or random bits of inspiration and you can hit a button that gives you nearly infinite story ideas.”- Eugenia Triantafyllou

      Eugenia Triantafyllou is talking about crutches for creativity and inspiration, but seems to miss the value of collecting interesting tidbits along the road of life that one can use later. Instead, the emphasis here becomes one of relying on an artificial intelligence doing it for you at the "hit of a button". If this is the case, then why not just let the artificial intelligence do all the work for you?

      This is the area where the cultural loss of mnemonics used in orality or even the simple commonplace book will make us easier prey for (over-)reliance on technology.


      Is serendipity really serendipity if it's programmed for you?

  12. Jan 2023
    1. https://press.princeton.edu/series/ancient-wisdom-for-modern-readers

      This appears like Princeton University Press is publishing sections of someone's commonplace books as stand alone issues per heading where each chapter has a one or more selections (in the original language with new translations).

      This almost feels like a version of The Great Books of the Western World watered down for a modern audience?

    1. The definitive scholarly edition of the Journal is being published insixteen volumes by Princeton University Press in their series TheWritings of Henry D. Thoreau. To date, seven volumes are in print,each costing around $100; the material not yet in book form isavailable online atwww.library.ucsb.edu/thoreau/writings_journals.html.
  13. Oct 2022
    1. The Journal gloated about its extravagant spending on newsgathering. Not atypical was this claim, in which the Journal disparaged its rivals, notably the New York Sun: "The reason the old journalism doesn't like the Journal is that the Journal gets the news, no matter what it costs. The Sun and its kind cannot afford to spend money since the Journal has taken their readers away from them, and the probability is they would not do so if they could afford it. They are still living in the Silurian age."16

      This is what yellow journalism was- getting the information they needed at whatever cost, eve if it meant making up some facts in order to attract readers.

  14. Sep 2022
    1. Right? You said... No, no, bullshit. Let's write it all down and we can go check it. Let's not argue about what was said. We've got this thing called writing. And once we do that, that means we can make an argument out of a much larger body of evidence than you can ever do in an oral society. It starts killing off stories, because stories don't refer back that much. And so anyway, a key book for people who are wary of McLuhan, to understand this, or one of the key books is by Elizabeth Eisenstein. It's a mighty tome. It's a two volume tome, called the "Printing Press as an Agent of Change." And this is kind of the way to think about it as a kind of catalyst. Because it happened. The printing press did not make the Renaissance happen. The Renaissance was already starting to happen, but it was a huge accelerant for what had already started happening and what Kenneth Clark called Big Thaw.

      !- for : difference between oral and written tradition - writing is an external memory, much larger than the small one humans are endowed with. Hence, it allowed for orders of magnitude more reasoning.

  15. Aug 2022
  16. Apr 2022
    1. A number of incunabula mention that 300 copies were printed, though this figure may have become formulaic. Most scholars assume that despite contextual variations, print runs generally increased during the sixteenth century—1,000 is often used as a ballpark estimate.181

      Print runs of the earliest books by publishers may have been around 300 copies going up to 1,000 copies during the sixteenth century. Compare this to 10,000 copies today to reach "best seller" status.

    2. Printing made books affordable to greater numbers than before, as various humanist observers noted, whether they felt this was for the better (Andrea de Bussi, Ludovico Carbone) or for the worse (e.g., Hieronymo Squarcia- fico).17

      Example that every new technology will have its proponents and its detractors.

      link to Plato/Socrates on the use of writing as a replacement for speaking and memory.

  17. Mar 2022
    1. PUTIN DOES HAVE THE CAPACITY TO DRIVE THAT NARRATIVE EVEN IN THE CASE OF WHAT'S GOING TO BE A MUCH WORSE ECONOMIC COLLAPSE THAN WHEN ANYONE IN THE UNITED STATES HAS BEEN EXPERIENCING FOR A CENTURY.

      Information warfare against Russian propaganda against its own people will not work.

    1. The European Union, in an unprecedented move, has decided to prohibit the broadcasting and distribution of content by these outlets throughout the European Union

      Example of censorship done by our western institutions. The reasoning here is to prevent the spread of one-sided, fact-misrepresenting propaganda -- but it's still censorship.

  18. Jan 2022
    1. commercial enterprises like Alexander Street Press, which offers libraries beautifully produced collections of everything from Harper’s Weekly to the letters and diaries of American immigrants.
  19. Dec 2021
  20. Nov 2021
  21. Oct 2021
  22. Jul 2021
  23. Jun 2021
    1. The arrival of Gutenberg’s printing press, in the 15th century, set off another round of teeth gnashing. The Italian humanist Hieronimo Squarciafico worried that the easy availability of books would lead to intellectual laziness, making men “less studious” and weakening their minds. Others argued that cheaply printed books and broadsheets would undermine religious authority, demean the work of scholars and scribes, and spread sedition and debauchery.

      Technology fears definitely repeat themselves. This pattern also repeated with social media, television, radio, etc.

      The key may be to worry about the thing that gets lost or changes, and come up with a way to exercise and utilize it despite the newest technology?

      How might we prevent ourselves from repeating this cyclic history with the next major change?

  24. May 2021
  25. Apr 2021
  26. Mar 2021
    1. Leg Press Pros
      • Hipertrofia

      Usado como um complemento ao agachamento para hipertrofia do quadríceps. Encaixaria como exercício metabólico.

      • Força

      Pode adicionar força para sair do chão no terra, o movimento do Leg Press é biomecanicamente similar a amplitude de início do Terra (pelo menos para a articulação do joelho).

      • Especificidade

      Alguns esportes como remo, ou até mesmo futebol americano (Para LB e DL) a produção de força é semelhante no stance inicial

    1. there are many factors that limit one’s ability to develop pressing strength while standing, including stability and neuromuscular control of the core musculature, the individual’s weight, the base of support the individual utilizes, and the direction in which the pressing motion is performed
  27. Jan 2021
    1. Will only show the tippy while the user is pressing the screen (not a tap)
  28. Sep 2020
  29. Jul 2020
  30. Jun 2020
  31. May 2020
  32. Apr 2020
    1. Sumner, P., Vivian-Griffiths, S., Boivin, J., Williams, A., Bott, L., Adams, R., Venetis, C. A., Whelan, L., Hughes, B., & Chambers, C. D. (2016). Exaggerations and Caveats in Press Releases and Health-Related Science News. PLOS ONE, 11(12), e0168217. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0168217

  33. Nov 2019
    1. From this page:

      AUPresses thinks more readers should be aware of the work they’re doing. That’s why during the organization’s annual University Press Week, it launched a reading list it’s calling READ. THINK. ACT., a list of 75 peer-reviewed books designed to help non-academic readers understand the world and work to make it a better place.

  34. Jun 2019
    1. washingtonpost.com

      Hello, I am the Citer Press bot :) I think this sentence is mentioning a news article without an explicit link. Here is what I found:

      Hit #1 (score of 97.9)

      Hit #2 (score of 76.7)

      Hit #3 (score of 71.2)

      Hit #4 (score of 69.1)

      Hit #5 (score of 68.1)

    1. Yomiuri Shimbun

      Hello, I am the Citer Press bot :) I think this sentence is mentioning a news article without an explicit link. Here is what I found:

      Hit #1 (score of 58.4)

      Hit #2 (score of 34.7)

      Hit #3 (score of 21.4)

      Hit #4 (score of 18.3)

      Hit #5 (score of 17.2)

    1. South China Morning Post

      Hello, I am the Citer Press bot :) I think this sentence is mentioning a news article without an explicit link. Here is what I found:

      Hit #1 (score of 7.6)

      Hit #2 (score of 7.6)

      Hit #3 (score of 6.0)

      Hit #4 (score of 6.0)

      Hit #5 (score of 5.2)

    1. Richmond Times-Dispatch

      Hello, I am the Citer Press bot :) I think this sentence is mentioning a news article without an explicit link. Here is what I found:

      Hit #1 (score of 8.0)

      Hit #2 (score of 7.5)

      Hit #3 (score of 6.0)

      Hit #4 (score of 5.6)

      Hit #5 (score of 5.0)

  35. Aug 2018
    1. Ten years ago, if I knew someone primarily through online means, you could guarantee they had their own domain name. It was just before the big explosion in social media use which meant that if you wanted a space online, you had to create it. This provided a barrier to entry in terms of the digital literacy skills required to register a domain, set up the necessary software and, of course, design, build and upload a website. The upside was that your digital identity was yours.

      Why have we gotten away from this? In short, I think it's because it was easier for big companies with massive resources to do the initial heavy lifting.

      If we look at history, Gutenberg created the first printing press and guarded it heavily for years. Eventually others figured out how to do it and printing presses spread like wildfire.Now, with some modest means and some time, almost anyone can publish.

      With simple standards and accessible hosting people can now broadly own their own domain name and create their own websites using a variety of content management systems. In a few years, this will be even more ubiquitous. Facebook is going to be just like Gutenberg attempting to hold onto his monopoly, but failing miserably.

      The best part, I think, is that the speed of digital technology means that the Facebook edifice is going to crumble faster than Gutenberg's.

  36. Apr 2017
  37. Mar 2017
    1. Duquesne University announced plans to close its press in February, explaining that it could no longer justify the annual subsidy of more than $200,000.

      Always sad to see a press close...

    1. My own view of where academic book publishing is heading is that it will mostly continue to publish the kinds of things it does now, but there will be increasing experimentation with formats, a renewed interest in selling directly to libraries, and enlarged activity in D2C — selling directly to end-users.

      Probably about right.

  38. Feb 2017
    1. A recent piece in the Charleston Gazette-Mail about the press that I direct, while oriented toward regional audiences, is the sort of thing I have in mind. The interview Peter Berkery and Fred Nachbaur did with Publishing Perspectives last fall is also good.

      Need to check these out.

    2. Inside Higher Ed made factually incorrect statements about the state of university press publishing.

      They should definitely be called out on this error.

  39. Dec 2016
    1. four minutes attacking the “nasty, dishonest press.”

      Foreign Policy's Ten Ways to Tell if Your Country is about to become a dictatorship.

  40. Oct 2016
    1. OUP is its own sort of beast. I think of it less as a university press and more as the last remaining political institution of the British Empire. In fact I think of it as that empire.
    2. There’s a big difference between, say, McGill-Queens University Press and Elsevier. One of them is a small press which really is in it for the love of publishing good books. The other is part of a massive corporation whose idea of demonstrating corporate responsibility is cutting its connections to the weapons industry.
  41. Apr 2016
  42. May 2015
    1. To achieve this, Climate Feedback—less an organization at this point than an amorphous gathering of climate scientists, oceanographers, and atmosperic physicists—is making use of a browser plugin from the nonprofit Hypothes.is to annotate climate journalism on the Web.
    1. What killed the annotated web was a lack of interest. Few could be bothered to download and install the plug-in
    1. He and his colleagues are keenly interested in the ability to annotate scholarship online, he says; Mellon has made serious investments in annotation tools and the development of open annotation standards by the university community and projects like Hypothes.is, which just received a two-year, $752,000 grant from the foundation to look into digital annotation in humanities and social-science scholarship.
  43. Apr 2015