12 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. View closed captioning or live transcription during a meeting or webinar Sign in to the Zoom desktop client. Join a meeting or webinar. Click the Show Captions button .
    2. If closed captioning or live transcripts are available during a meeting or webinar, you can view these as a participant
    1. User To enable automated captioning for your own use: Sign in to the Zoom web portal. In the navigation menu, click Settings. Click the Meeting tab. Under In Meeting (Advanced), click the Automated captions toggle to enable or disable it. If a verification dialog displays, click Enable or Disable to verify the change.Note: If the option is grayed out, it has been locked at either the group or account level. You need to contact your Zoom admin. (Optional) Click the edit option to select which languages you want to be available for captioning. Note: Step 7 may not appear for some users until September 2022, as a set of captioning enhancements are rolling out to users over the course of August.
  2. Nov 2022
  3. Sep 2022
  4. Feb 2022
    1. Principle 2: Consider Adding On‐Screen Text to Narration in Special Situations

      p. 139-141

      Clark and Mayer describe a key exception to the first principle they describe. One of the special situations they describe consists of when a learner must "exert greater cognitive effort to comprehend spoken text rather than printed text" (p. 140). This could be when the verbal material is complex and challenging, such as when learners are learning another language or when terminology is challenging such as might be encountered in scientific, technical, or legal(?) domains (p. 141).

      [P]rinting unfamiliar technical terms on the screen may actually reduce cognitive processing because the learner does not need to grapple with decoding the spoken words.

      However, it may be necessary to ensure that video is slow-paced or learner-controlled under circumstances where both audio narration and on-screen text are provided. Mayer, Lee, and Peebles (2014) found that when video is fast-paced, redundant text can cause cognitive overload, even when learners are non-native speakers.

      Mayer, R. E., Lee, H., & Peebles, A. (2014). Multimedia Learning in a Second Language: A Cognitive Load Perspective. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 28(5), 653–660. https://doi.org/10.1002/acp.3050

    2. Principle 1: Do Not Add On‐Screen Text to Narrated Graphics

      p. 133-134

      Clark and Mayer advise against providing redundant on-screen text at the same time that graphics (video) and narration are provided. They base their recommendation on both research and theory. And they provide two reasons before getting into the details: 1) learners reading on-screen text might not attend to graphics and 2) learners may try to reconcile on-screen text and audio narration and engage in extraneous processing defined below (p. 459)[emphasis added]:

      Irrelevant mental work during learning that results from ineffective instructional design of the lesson. For example, a graphic appears at the top of a scrolling screen and text explaining the graphic appears at the bottom so that contiguity is violated.

      But what if recognizing words and phrases accurately becomes a key component of comprehending a graphic or a video-recorded presentation? And what if the combination of audio narration and on-screen text can be used to support that that comprehension?

      There are some interesting studies in second language learning that seem to show similar benefits.

      Gass, S., Winke, P., Isbell, D. R., & Ahn, J. (2019). How captions help people learn languages: A working-memory, eye-tracking study. Language Learning & Technology, 23(2), 84–104. https://doi.org/10125/44684

      Mayer, R. E., Lee, H., & Peebles, A. (2014). Multimedia Learning in a Second Language: A Cognitive Load Perspective. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 28(5), 653–660. https://doi.org/10.1002/acp.3050

      Winke, P., Gass, S., & Sydorenko, T. (2010). The Effects of Captioning Videos Used for Foreign Language Listening Activities. Language Learning & Technology, 14(1), 65–86. http://dx.doi.org/10125/44203

  5. Aug 2020
    1. Video 2.1

      The closed captioning is in an Asian language. Can that be changed to English or is this something customizable by the learner?

  6. Oct 2017
    1. Transcription is supported in the following languages for MECHANICAL fidelity jobs:

      List of supported languages for ASR or Mechanical captions.

  7. Dec 2016
  8. May 2016
  9. Aug 2015