22 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Nov 2022
    1. dealised utopia

      Possibly, besides web monetization, there can be donation basket like ko-fi beside curation, as well as cleatly linking back to the original that can have a donation basket as well. The options are complementary.

    1. From a technical point of view, the IndieWeb people have worked on a number of simple, easy to implement protocols, which provide the ability for web services to interact openly with each other, but in a way that allows for a website owner to define policy over what content they will accept.

      Thought you might like Web Monetization.

    1. partnerships, networking, and revenue generation such as donations, memberships, pay what you want, and crowdfunding

      I have thought long about the same issue and beyond. The triple (wiki, Hypothesis, donations) could be a working way to search for OER, form a social group processing them, and optionally support the creators.

      I imagine that as follows: a person wants to learn about X. They can head to the wiki site about X and look into its Hypothesis annotations, where relevant OER with their preferred donation method can be linked. Also, study groups interested in the respective resource or topic can list virtual or live meetups there. The date of the meetups could be listed in a format that Hypothesis could search and display on a calendar.

      Wiki is integral as it categorizes knowledge, is comprehensive, and strives to address biases. Hypothesis stitches websites together for the benefit of the site owners and the collective wisdom that emerges from the discussions. Donations support the creators so they can dedicate their time to creating high-quality resources.

      Main inspirations:

      Deschooling Society - Learning Webs

      Building the Global Knowledge Graph

      Schoolhouse calendar

    1. locally-based staff and carries out its programs in conjunction with local partners. Teams of international instructors and volunteers support the programs through projects year-round.

      So many good features in your project!

      Employing local staff that know the setting and can be role models for the kids.

      Supporting mentoring by volunteers to scale.

      Working with bodies to get a visceral experience that change is possible.

      Mentoring in groups to build a community.

      Spotlighting diversity and building bridges beyond the local community.

      Some related resources: Ballet dancer from Kibera

      Fighting poverty and gang violence in Rio's favelas with ballet

    1. Publishers can create interactive stories on the platform and incorporate them in their website.

      I love this! It is similar to Prezi or VoiceThread.

      Do you also support collaborative editing (public or with invited collaborators)? If yes, a high-resolution world map could be used for collaborative pinning of local events, meetups, news, videos, and so on, such as radio.garden or YouTube Geofind.

    1. Localisation ≠ Translation To start with, we have been researching, publishing, and producing articles on the topics of localisation to gain a wider understanding for implementing it. Here's some of what we published with @sophie authoring:

      Have you thought about crowdsourcing localization via weblate? It includes DeepL and can also be a learning ground, such as Duolingo Immersion.

    1. Creating video tutorials has been hard when things are so in flux. We've been reluctant to invest time - and especially volunteer time - in producing videos while our hybrid content and delivery strategy is still changing and developing. The past two years have been a time of experimentation and iteration. We're still prototyping!

      Have you thought about opening the project setting and the remixing to educators or even kids? That could create additional momentum.

      A few related resources you might want to check out for inspiration: Science Buddies, Seesaw, Exploratorium

    1. 11/30 Youth Collaborative

      I went through some of the pieces in the collection. It is important to give a platform to the voices that are missing from the conversation usually.

      Just a few similar initiatives that you might want to check out:

      Storycorps - people can record their stories via an app

      Project Voice - spoken word poetry

      Living Library - sharing one's story

      Freedom Writers - book and curriculum based on real-life stories

    1. not really about the content of the sessions. Or anything you take from it. The most important thing are the relationships, the connections you gain from sharing the things you're passionate about with the people who are interested in it, the momentum you build from working on your project in preparation for a session

      I somewhat disagree - I think this community building is successful precisely because there is a shared interest or goal. It goes hand in hand. If there is no connecting theme or goal, the groups fall apart.

    1. Donations

      To add some other intermediary services:

      To add a service for groups:

      To add a service that enables fans to support the creators directly and anonymously via microdonations or small donations by pre-charging their Coil account to spend on content streaming or tipping the creators' wallets via a layer containing JS script following the Interledger Protocol proposed to W3C:

      If you want to know more, head to Web Monetization or Community or Explainer

      Disclaimer: I am a recipient of a grant from the Interledger Foundation, so there would be a Conflict of Interest if I edited directly. Plus, sharing on Hypothesis allows other users to chime in.

    1. I only know a handful of people directly making money from blogging (via ads, subscriptions etc) but I know many more who: Got a better career because of blogging (new job, better pay etc) Negotiated better contracts (e.g. with a publisher or platform) because they had “an audience” Sold their own courses / ebooks / books / merchandise / music Blogging is this kind of engine that opens up economic opportunity and advantage. Being visible in the networked economy has real value.

      Making money from blogging isn't just about selling ads or subscriptions a direct thing. It can be indirect too. Eg selling courses or books.

  3. Dec 2021
  4. Jun 2021
  5. Mar 2021
  6. Feb 2020
  7. Sep 2019
  8. Aug 2015
    1. The problem is scale. A larger, general-interest site can't be built purely atop longform, because longform takes time — both for writers to produce and readers to read. Therefore, as both Buzzfeed and Gawker realized early on, well-done longform could be the steak, but it couldn't be the meal.

      Why is it a problem if things take longer to read and write?

      I suspect the answer has to do with the monetization terms in play. Too much of advertising is still based on page views rather than time on page. As a result, it's extremely beneficial to have users return to the site daily and spend 15 minutes reading 5 stupid listicles rather than returning to the site once a week to spend an hour and a half reading a couple articles. This also motivates the obnoxious pagination common on news sites.