137 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2023
    1. And in the icy silence of the tomb,

      I find it odd how there was mention of a tomb. Maybe its use is to describe his past where he was stuck with a past would be cold or cruel to most and lonely.

    1. Storytelling Will Save the EarthEmotional resonance, not cold statistics, will bring home the scale of the climate crisis—and the need for action.

      !- Title : Storytelling Will Save the Earth Emotional resonance, not cold statistics, will bring home the scale of the climate crisis—and the need for action. - See related story: Brian Eno – "We need the creative industry to help inspire climate action" https://hyp.is/go?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.imperial.ac.uk%2Fnews%2F241832%2Fbrian-eno-we-need-creative-industry%2F&group=world

    1. he power of the creative industries to inspire movements was largely absent from high-level discussions on climate change, such as at COP (Conference of the Parties), or in communicating scientific findings, such as from the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change).

      !- Creative industries : absence in high level talks like COPs or climate communication

    2. Brian Eno – "We need the creative industry to help inspire climate action"

      !- Title : Brian Eno – "We need the creative industry to help inspire climate action"

  2. Dec 2022
    1. Fluxus was an international, interdisciplinary community of artists, composers, designers and poets during the 1960s and 1970s who engaged in experimental art performances which emphasized the artistic process over the finished product.[1][2] Fluxus is known for experimental contributions to different artistic media and disciplines and for generating new art forms.
    1. So I’ve started a routine where every few years, I block out a couple of days to sit down and review all my idea tools—and other rituals of how I structure my creative thinking— to see if there's something that can be improved upon.

      As a strategy for avoiding shiny object syndrome, one can make a routine of making a "creative inventory" of one's tools.

      There is generally a high switching cost, so tools need to be an order of magnitude more useful, beneficial, or even fun to make it worthwhile.

    2. In my line of work as a writer, there’s a near endless stream of new applications coming out that touch different stages in my workflow: e-book readers, notetaking apps, tools for managing PDFs, word processors, bibliographic databases. The problem is that it’s very tricky to switch horses midstream with these kinds of tools, which means you have a natural tendency to get locked into a particular configuration, potentially missing out on better approaches.

      Steven Johnson indicates that it can be difficult to change workflows, tools, apps, etc.

    1. “I thought that art schools should just be places where you thought about creative behavior, whereas they thought an art school was a place where you made painters,” he said later.

      We should do better at teaching and training creative behavior in schools. We say that we encourage exploration but somehow do it in all the wrong ways such we discourage it wholly.

    1. Then I remembered a little card game I came up with to make jam sessions more interesting: Have each band member list 10 musical acts they’d like to play in Write each musical act on an index card Shuffle the cards, and, without revealing the cars, deal one to each band member. Keep the cards secret — the game is no fun if you can see the cards before you play. Just like any other jam session, it helps to pick a key and start with the rhythm. Everyone has to pretend like they’re playing in the act written on their card. Jam until it gets boring. At the end, everybody gets to guess which card each person was dealt. Repeat until you’re out of cards

      A game by Austin Kleon for making jam sessions less boring using cards.

      Inspired by Oblique Strategies and The Creative Tarot.

    1. https://www.dalekeiger.net/untitled/

      Dale Keiger is tap dancing his way into a definition for the underlying traits for encouraging and expanding on creativity. There's definitely something here worth pursuing further and giving a specific name to.

      Some it is very akin to the ideas behind combinatorial creativity of working (dancing in Kelly's case) on the mundane with precision and drive and perhaps at least a soupçon of obsessiveness, but openness to the new.

      How can we sharpen this set of ideas to settle on the right list of "ingredients"? Is there a way to hone in on this sort of creation of flow within a certain creative area while simultaneously not getting bored? Is it the small string of creative breakthroughs in the process of practice which open up new avenues and help create the flow to prevent boredom?

      How might relate to Anders Ericsson's work on on deliberate practice or plateau principle coming into play, particularly to prevent boredom to encourage one to continue on with their practice?

      I haven't put my finger on it but there were hints in it from a Yo-Yo Ma ad for Masterclass I saw the other day (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dbjgHkj-syM)..

  3. Nov 2022
    1. Mark: The Japanese hypertext scholar Kumiyo Nakakoji talks about amplified representational talkback, which is a general design phenomenon. An architect, an artist, or a writer puts something on paper and then looks at it. You look at it, and then it seems different from what you had in mind, and you either correct what you’ve written, or you see that what you’ve written is right and correct your bad idea. That kind of representational talkback is fundamental to all sorts of all creative processes, from the sciences to the arts.
    1. The erupting volcano represents Productive ambiguity. This is where the real work is done at scale. Concepts can be productively ambiguous through straight metaphor, or by mass (media) convergence on a particular term. It resonates with many people.

      New, relatively well-formed ideas may have lost much of their ambiguity to their creators, but they're solid enough to be communicated at scale to others. The newness of the concepts as they're accepted and used by others provides a tremendous level of productive ambiguity as the ideas spread and further solidify and are combined with a broader field of pre-existing ideas.

    2. Creative ambiguity. This is where one part of an idea is fixed, but the other part has a lot of freedom of movement. A good example of this would be appending ‘digital’ or ‘e-‘ to existing ideas – such as ‘e-books’ or ‘digital literacy’. Others can begin to see what the person is getting at.

      As portions of ideas begin to become clear and crystalize, they still maintain some creative ambiguity while the remaining portions aren't necessarily clearly defined. Creatively ambiguous ideas are better defined than generatively ambiguous ones.

    3. https://dougbelshaw.com/blog/2015/01/22/volcanoes-and-ambiguity/

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Aaron Davis </span> in 📑 The Two Definitions of Zettelkasten | Read Write Collect (<time class='dt-published'>11/18/2022 19:54:00</time>)</cite></small>

  4. Oct 2022
    1. Include a CC0 or CC-BY statement in the data (including MARC records) you create. Here’s an example from theUniversity of Florida:588 _ _ $a This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 “No Rights Reserved”license. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to itworldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.

      Sample MARC 588 CC0 statement from University of Florida

  5. Aug 2022
    1. The ideas expressed in Creative Experience continueto have an impact. Follett’s process of integration, for example, forms the basisof what is now commonly referred to as a ‘‘win-win’’ approach to conflictresolution; and her distinction between ‘‘power-with’’ and ‘‘power-over’’ hasbeen used by so many distinguished thinkers that it has become a part of ourpopular vocabulary. ≤

      While she may not have coined the phrase "win-win", Mary Parker Follett's process of integration described in her book Creative Experience (Longmans, Green & Co., 1924) forms the basis of what we now refer to as the idea of "win-win" conflict resolution.

      Follett's ideas about power over and power with also stem from Creative Experience as well.

      1. Those using the power-over, power-with distinction include Dorothy Emmett, the first woman president of the British Aristotelian Society, and Hannah Arendt; Mans- bridge, ‘‘Mary Parker Follet: Feminist and Negotiator,’’ xviii–xxii.

      Syndication link: - https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Win%E2%80%93win_game&type=revision&diff=1102353117&oldid=1076197356

  6. Jun 2022
    1. Writers diverge by collecting raw material for the story they wantto tell, sketching out potential characters, and researching historicalfacts.

      Missing here is the creative divergence of creating plot points which could be later connected. This part of the process is incredibly difficult for many as seen in the poor second act development in most of narrative history. Beginnings and endings are usually incredibly easy, but the middle portions for connecting the two is incredibly hard.

      Is this because creating connections between the ends when there no intervening ideas to connect is nearly impossible? How can one brainstorm middle plot points so that they might be more easily connected?

    1. The box is not a substitute for creating. The box doesn’t compose or write apoem or create a dance step. The box is the raw index of your preparation. It is therepository of your creative potential, but it is not that potential realized.

      Great quote about what a zettelkasten isn't. This is also one of the reasons why I've underlined the amount of work that one must put into the box to get productive material back out the other end.

  7. May 2022
    1. Nate Angell as our new Director of Communications and Community.

      Congratulations Nate! I'm sure Hypothes.is will miss you desperately, but Creative Commons will be all the better for your work and contribution.

      https://creativecommons.org/2022/05/03/cc-welcomes-nate-angell/

  8. Apr 2022
    1. https://www.themarginalian.org/2011/06/20/inside-notebooks/

      There are a number of books which feature the sketchbooks and notebooks of famous writers, researchers and artists. However, most of their work is presented as art in and of itself. Rarely are the messiest and ugliest pages pictured. Most of the layouts in these books are laid out as art. Frequently missing are the structural parts and interviews with the original authors talking about their process. How do they actually use these notebooks in practice? How do ideas move from their heads into the notebooks and from there into their practical work? The notebooks only capture raw ideas as a scaffolding for extending the user's brain and thinking, but it doesn't capture the intangible ideas and portions of process which are still trapped within their brains. To be able to evaluate these portions, the author needs to talk or write about those missing portions of the process otherwise the way they create genius is wholly missing. A viewer of such notebooks would be no closer to creating genius for themselves by attempting to follow the same patterns without these additional structures. It's like the indigenous peoples who talk with rocks as part of their cultural practice—so much of what is happening is missing from the description of "talking with rocks" that most people wouldn't even know where to begin, but for the initiated, the process would be imminently crystal clear.

      Which of these books actually delves into the process and does interviews as well?

      This article actually lays out the notebooks as their own form of art rather than centering the idea of creative process as a means of helping others to follow these same patterns. We need the book that does for the art and design area what Sönke Ahrens' book How to Take Smart Notes does for the note taking space. It's interesting to see Niklas Luhmann's collection of 90,000 index cards, but without knowing how he used them and what purpose they served, the enterprise is lost. Similarly the depiction of Roland Barthes' index cards in Roland Barthes has a similar function. Showing them is not equivalent to actually understanding them.

      link to: https://hypothes.is/a/3SOmoMcMEey8n9dSUWhPJw

    1. The Card Index as Creativity Machine

      Rowan Wilken admits that Cornelia Vismann's use of files for transmission, storage, cancellation, manipulation, and destruction are remarkable, but that the key feature of the card index as a file type is its use for creative production.

    1. During the same period zibaldone designated notebooks kept bywriters, artists, and merchants to record a wide variety of information: outgoingletters, copies of documents, indexes to books, lists of paintings, and excerptscopied from all kinds of texts, including poetry, prose, merchants’ manuals, legalsources, and tables of weights and measures.27
  9. Mar 2022
    1. Creative work is not complete until it is disseminated

      This is an interesting perspective, but are there cases where it's false?

      Link to the idea at CAA that you haven't really read a script unless you've actively acted upon what you've read.

  10. Feb 2022
    1. We need to getour thoughts on paper first and improve them there, where we canlook at them. Especially complex ideas are difficult to turn into alinear text in the head alone. If we try to please the critical readerinstantly, our workflow would come to a standstill. We tend to callextremely slow writers, who always try to write as if for print,perfectionists. Even though it sounds like praise for extremeprofessionalism, it is not: A real professional would wait until it wastime for proofreading, so he or she can focus on one thing at a time.While proofreading requires more focused attention, finding the rightwords during writing requires much more floating attention.

      Proofreading while rewriting, structuring, or doing the thinking or creative parts of writing is a form of bikeshedding. It is easy to focus on the small and picayune fixes when writing, but this distracts from the more important parts of the work which really need one's attention to be successful.

      Get your ideas down on paper and only afterwards work on proofreading at the end. Switching contexts from thinking and creativity to spelling, small bits of grammar, and typography can be taxing from the perspective of trying to multi-task.


      Link: Draft #4 and using Webster's 1913 dictionary for choosing better words/verbiage as a discrete step within the rewrite.


      Linked to above: Are there other dictionaries, thesauruses, books of quotations, or individual commonplace books, waste books that can serve as resources for finding better words, phrases, or phrasing when writing? Imagine searching through Thoreau's commonplace book for finding interesting turns of phrase. Naturally searching through one's own commonplace book is a great place to start, if you're saving those sorts of things, especially from fiction.

      Link this to Robin Sloan's AI talk and using artificial intelligence and corpuses of literature to generate writing.

    1. The defining narrative of our online moment concerns the decline of text, and the exploding reach and power of audio and video.

      Over the years texting has become something that many people tend to do as they go on through their day. However, now that we are entering a new decade we now see that people are shifting towards interacting with one another through the use of cameras (facetime) and audio messages.

  11. Jan 2022
  12. Oct 2021
    1. Adobe Audition: Digital audio workstation software.

      I already have Creative Cloud. I might as well use Adobe Audition.

  13. Sep 2021
    1. ving... Haste is seen as a lack of decorum combined with diabolical am

      Haste is seen as a lack of decorum combined with diabolical ambition.

      What a fantastic definition of haste!

      via P. Bourdieu, "The attitude of the Algerian peasant toward time", in Mediterranean Countrymen, ed. J. Pitt-Rivers (Paris, 1963), PP. 55

    1. What motivates the characters or the author? What are they seeking? What is their purpose? Here’s how Kurt Vonnegut described the importance of incentives in books: “When I used to teach creative writing, I would tell the students to make their characters want something right away—even if it’s only a glass of water. Characters paralyzed by the meaninglessness of modern life still have to drink water from time to time.”
    2. Before beginning this piece I'm reminded to note some advice given to me by Rick Kurtzman at Creative Artists Agency (CAA) on reading scripts: If you're not going to act on having read (a script), then why bother having read it in the first place?

      He meant to make notes, write coverage, create writer lists for rewriting, producer lists for selling, director list for directing, casting lists. One should tell people about the (good) things one read. Make your reading produce something.

  14. Aug 2021
    1. Creative Commons

      “Creative Commons es una organización que permite a la gente publicar sus obras creativas bajo una licencia que permite más flexibilidad que el <<todos los derechos reservados>> que viene por defecto en las leyes sobre derecho de autor". (Merritt, 2005)

    2. We start with a historical perspective, keeping in mind that history itself is a common even when it reveals the ways in which we have been divided, if it is narrated through a multiplicity of voices. History is our collective memory, our extended body connecting us to a vast world of struggles that give meaning and power to our political practice.

      Estoy de acuerdo con el compromiso que tiene un autor por compartir la información de sus contenidos en beneficio de una comunidad que se puede educar con base a las necesidades de su receptor, demostrando que, sin la necesidad de condicionar económicamente a los involucrados, se puede transformar favorablemente la organización social de las reproducciones.

    3. So far Maine lobster fishers have been considered a harmless exception confirming the neoliberal rule that a commons can survive only in special and limited circumstances. Viewed through the lens of class struggle, however, the Maine lobster common has elements of an anti-capitalist common in that it involves workers' control of some of the important decisions concerning the work process and its outcomes. This experience then constitutes an invaluable training, providing examples of how large-scale commons can operate. At the same time, the fate of the lobster commons is still determined by the international seafood market in which they are embedded. If the US market collapses or the state allows off-shore oil drilling in the Gulf of Maine, they will be dissolved. The Maine lobster commons, then, cannot be a model for us.

      Mientras que Caffentzis y Federici plantean Creative Commons “anticapitalistas”, el teórico investigador belga, especializado en la tecnología, cultura e innovación en los negocios Michel Bauwens afirma que “la propiedad entre iguales es una forma postcapitalista porque no es excluyente y crea un patrimonio común con costes marginales de reproducción” (Sonvilla, 2012, p. 28), dando a entender que el intercambio individual de la expresión creativa determina el nivel en que se comparte y, en cambio, se puede optar por una ‘General Public License’ (Licencia Pública General), la cual exige que todo aporte que genere un cambio en lo común, también pertenece a todos. Referencia

  15. Jun 2021
    1. Angelo: Yes, it was very difficult. Growing up like, up until middle school, I was all about school. I was in honors, AP classes, all of that. There was a point where one of my teachers—one of my reading teachers—basically just had me by myself because whatever she was teaching wasn't enough for me. She had me on a college level reading. I forgot the book, The Count of Monte Cristo? The Count of Monte Cristo.Isabel: That's definitely college level [Laughs].Angelo: Yeah. So—Isabel: In what grade?Angelo: I was in the eighth grade. And so that was awesome for me because I feel like, “Okay, I'm not from here, but they're praising me, and they're saying I'm doing good." And I'm sorry, what was the question?Isabel: No, no, that was perfect. I was just saying it's a hard dynamic, like refusing those opportunities.Angelo: Yes. And so after middle school, I was also into poetry a lot. I got a reward and I was asked to go to Nevada to receive the reward in front of a bunch of people. The website was legit—it was if you search poetry on Google, it was the very first one that came up. It was even to a point where you search my name and my poem came up. I got a mail certificate inviting me to Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada to receive that reward. I ran around the house; I told my sister. But at the end of the day, it was that risk of if we go, we're going to get pulled over, and we're going to get deported. So, you can't receive that certificate.Isabel: And this is a poem you've written yourself?Angelo: Yes.Isabel: What was it about?Angelo: I think it was a love poem, it was most definitely a love poem, yeah.Isabel: I love poetry too. I only imagine how awful would be to when you pour yourself into a piece of art, like poetry, and then get recognition for it, and how amazing that feels, but then having that last hurdle that you can't go over.Angelo: Yeah. So, once we got that established that "No, you can't." Basically, for me it was like, “So what's the point? So what am I working for? If I finish high school, I'm not going to be able to go to college, what's the point?” And I really never saw a future after middle school.Isabel: Yeah, I feel like some students in high school have a hard time staying motivated knowing that they might be able to go to college someday. So, like being a high school student and knowing that you can't because of the law, I can only imagine being very discouraging in terms of doing that work. You mentioned you stopped going to school midway through your junior year, so what happened there and where did you go from there?Angelo: Well I dropped out of school because I had a baby. So from then on it was basically work, work, work. And that was basically my life after junior year—just work and work.

      Time in the US, School, Working hard, getting good grades, Extracurricular activities, poetry, Struggling, Dropping out, Immigration status, lost opportunities, in the shadows

  16. May 2021
    1. “but I how will I be able to find stuff later on?”. Good question we’ll answer later. A part of the answer is simply by re-reading. If you don’t re-read what you’ve written, nothing will ever happen with it. So, if you intent to simply write down thoughts in order to feel a temporary moment of relief, fine. But if you intent to change your life, that won’t suffice.

      One needs to re-read and reprocess things from time to time. This is a part of the combinatorial creativity that having notes is for.

      This is reminiscent of the CAA addage: "If you read something and then don't tell anyone about it, you may as well not have read it in the first place."

  17. Apr 2021
    1. Rajiv reminded us that: “Openness can be leveraged for justice, but it can also do harm. Closed practices can also do harm, but there are times when closed is the empowered choice. Choice is key. We must serve justice, rather than merely being open.”
    2. Rajiv cited an example highlighted by tara robertson of an instance where openness raised troubling ethical issues.  When the lesbian porn magazine On Our Backs was digitised and released under CC BY licence, women who had modelled for the magazine felt that work they had created for their own community had been appropriated for uses they had never intended and did not consent to. 

      It can be important when opening content up, especially at higher corporate levels, to take into account future uses of material that might not have been forseen when they were created. This may be especially important with the use of algorithms.

    1. The four C’s of 21st Century skills are: Critical thinking Creativity Collaboration Communication

      Convenient to have these four share an initial. (My perception is that a tendency to emphasize this type of parallelism has been strengthening over the years. At least, I don't recall this practice being common in French when I grew up.)

    1. We are are continuing our commitment to creating our games that are free and widely accessible anyone that is curious by making our game files available under Creative Commons license BY–NC–SA 4.0. That means we will continue offering a full, free print-and-play kit for Pax Pamir, and later this campaign, John Company! Anyone can use, remix, and share the game, so long as they do not use it for commercial purposes. 
  18. Mar 2021
    1. I decided I'd make my content available with a CC BY-NC-SA (Attribution, Non-commercial, Share Alike) license, so that people could freely use and adapt my stuff, but would need to cite me as its source, make their content that was based on my work available for free, and slap a similar license on it. This is important, I think, to prevent the materials that educators make and contribute freely to the community STAY FREE. Without these stipulations (NC and SA), it would be possible for a commercial textbook company, for example, to grab the content I've created and add it to their "walled garden" of content which is technically free, but requires an expensive subscription to GET TO. This is a subversion of the Open idea which a lot of commercial publishers have tried, to reduce their cost of content and make themselves seem hip and up to date. The community calls it Openwashing.

      A good description of openwashing. I've seen some examples of the practice in the wild, but should make a note to document some.

    2. Creative Commons certification course

      Creative Commons Certificate

      The Certificate is an in-depth course about CC licenses, open practices and the ethos of the Commons. The course is composed of readings, quizzes, discussions, and practical exercises to develop learners’ open skills. We provide personalized engagement with expert facilitators and copyright lawyers in the field, and offer a 1:25 (max) ratio of facilitators to course participants.

  19. Feb 2021
    1. but what does it mean to be clever, and how can you teach someone to be clever?

      Head Scratcher: How do you teach "cleverness"? This is a tough question and I feel that it is hard to understand for most instructors. How do I get my students to be more creative and clever, I believe we usually feel that students either are or are not creative and thats the end of the story. So really maybe we are the ones at fault for not teaching studetns to be "creative".

    1. We still must decide how to present certain information, but it doesn’t have to be at the cost of another medium.

      Headscratcher: How do we make sure, in our times creating instuction, that we do not neglect a medium that could be used for instruction?

      I feel that one way could be to allow learners choice in how they respond to prompts and learning. I feel that this could allow for students to use their gifting and talents to excel and produce amazing work.

    2. engages the learners and goes beyond their expectations.

      DOI: Creative Instruction - Engages learners and goes above thier expectations.

      Another interesting take on creative instruction. I like that they define it as going "beyond [learner] expectations".

    3. instruction that keeps learners motivated while still meeting the objectives of the instruction.

      DOI: Creative instruction - Motivating instruction that stays on task.

      Great definition that hints at what creative intruction looks like.

    1. Emerald

      https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/open-research-emerald/our-open-research-policies

      Emerald already has progressive green open access / self archiving policies which allow immediate open access for the authors accepted manuscript (AAM) under a creative commons attribution non-commercial license (CC BY-NC). This demonstrates that Emerald cannot agree with much of the statement they are signing. Note, Plan S ask for CC BY or CC BY-ND is permissible under Plan S by exception. The funders' request for a more permissive CC BY license is all I can identify as a potential problem, but there are no specific concerns raised in the statement.

    2. However, we are unable to support one route to compliance offered by Plan S,

      The publishers below will not support the Plan S rights retention strategy (RRS). In its simplest form the RRS re-asserts the authors' rights as the rights holder to assign a copyright license of their choice (CC BY informed by their funding agency) to all versions of their research/intellectual output. In the case of the RRS states that the author should apply a CC BY license to their accepted manuscript (AAM) if they cannot afford to pay article processing charges or choose not to apply a CC BY license to the Version of Record (VoR), which they are free to do. Therefore, this statement is either saying the undersigned will not carry publications forward to publication (most appropriate approach), or they will not support the same copyright laws which fundamentally protects their rights and revenue after a copyright transfer agreement is signed by the rightsholder.

      Academy of Dental Materials

      Acoustical Society of America

      AIP Publishing

      American Academy of Ophthalmology

      American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

      American Chemical Society

      American Gastroenterological Association American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics

      American Medical Association

      American Physical Society

      American Society for Investigative Pathology

      American Society for Radiation Oncology

      American Society of Civil Engineers

      American Society of Hematology

      American Society of Clinical Oncology

      American Association of Physicists in Medicine

      American Association of Physics Teachers

      AVS – The Society for Science and Technology of Materials, Interfaces, and Processing

      Brill

      British Journal of Anaesthesia

      Budrich Academic Press

      Cambridge Media

      Cambridge University Press

      Canadian Cardiovascular Society

      De Gruyter

      Duncker & Humblot

      Elsevier

      Emerald

      Erich Schmidt Verlag

      French Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

      Frommann-Holzboog Verlag

      Future Science Group 

      Hogrefe

      International Association for Gondwana Research

      IOP Publishing

      Journal of Nursing Regulation

      Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy (JOSPT).

      Julius Klinkhardt KG

      La Découverte

      Laser Institute America

      Materials Research Forum LLC

      The Optical Society (OSA)

      Pearson Benelux

      SAGE Publishing

      Society of Rheology

      Springer Nature

      Taylor & Francis Group

      The Geological Society of America

      Thieme Group

      Uitgeverij Verloren

      Verlag Barbara Budrich

      Vittorio Klostermann

      wbv Media

      Wiley

      Wolters Kluwer

  20. Nov 2020
    1. And because we know many different types of audiences—including those we don’t know about!—will be interested in our work, we encourage you to freely republish our work under the terms of our Creative Commons license. 

      Cool to see a journalistic enterprise publishing under a Creative Commons license.

      Also sort of fun to see a tiny bit of a Kicks Condor design ethic baked into their website. Naturally it's a tad bit more buttoned up, but that's to be expected I suppose.

  21. Oct 2020
    1. The individual is helpless socially, if left by himself. Even the association of the members of one's own family fails to satisfied that desire which every normal individual has of being with his fellows, of being a part of a larger group than the family. If he comes into contact with his neighbors, there will be an accumulation of social capital, which may immediately satisfy his social needs and which may bear a social potentiality sufficient for the substantial improvement of life in the whole community. The community as a whole will benefit by the cooperation of all its parts, while the individual will find in his associations the advantages of the help, the sympathy, and the fellowship of his neighbors. First, then, there must be an accumulation of community social capital. Such accumulation may be effected by means of public entertainments, picnics, and a variety of other community gatherings. When the people of a given community have become acquainted with one another and have formed a habit of coming together occasionally for entertainment, social intercourse, and personal enjoyment, then by skillful leadership this social capital may easily be directed towards the general improvement of the community well-being.
  22. Sep 2020
    1. Lawrence Lessig, Hal Abelson, and Eric Eldred received funding to establish a new non-profit called Creative Commons

      CC Creative Commons

    1. repetition of yes all leads up to the final yes to marriage. the lack of punctuation also makes the whole thing read as if it's being said very quickly, as if a lot of thoughts are happening all at once.

    1. master

      the duality of master and disaster

    2. losing

      the repetition of the many forms of the verb "to lose" highlights the theme of loss throughout the poem without the poet having to explicitly tell the reader what it is about

    1. We 

      The repetition of the word "we" (as well as the placement in the poem) create a rhythm that stands out. Especially since the lines are very short, the words that are repeated stands out even more.

    1. “His writing often references the importance of large open spaces to allow people to access fresh air and sunlight, and discusses how air could be ‘disinfected’ by sun and foliage,” Carr says. Planning for Central Park, which would be designed by Olmsted and Calvert Vaux, began in the immediate aftermath of New York’s second cholera outbreak. Thanks to the success of that project, Olmsted, whose first child had died of cholera, went on to design more than 100 public parks and recreation grounds including those in Boston, Buffalo, Chicago and Detroit.

      His solution could not be back by clinical research at the time, yet the success of his experiment proved enough to catch on quickly...

    1. social capital, neighborhood-level effects on health, housing and health, and clustering of fast-food establishments around schools

      harnessing big data for good!!

    1. “There are ready-made houses and smaller buildings that can be put together like a package,” adds Woltjer.

      Construction (private and public) taken for granted as necessary?

  23. Aug 2020
    1. Additional Resources

      I suggest an additional section titled tools. These tools really helped me in gaining a better understanding of structuring attributions etc.

      The Attribution Builder is really helpful when there is uncertainty as to how to proceed with citing sources, especially as citing CC Licenses seems different from scholarly practices.

      1. Open Attribution Builder, by WA SBCTC, [n.d.]. The Open Attribution Builder is licensed under CC BY 4.0.
      2. CC “Select your License” tool logic - Beta version, by Wyblib40, 2020. Licensed under CC BY 4.0. (Please note that this workflow logic diagram I created myself in order to get a feel for the new License Chooser tool (2020)

      CC “Select your License” tool logic - Beta version

  24. Jul 2020
  25. Jun 2020
  26. May 2020
    1. Whether in music (Bach, Lennon), art (Picasso, Bernini), film (Tarantino, Anderson), games (Blow, Lantz), fiction (Kundera, Tolstoy), the most eminent work is usually the result of a single person’s creative efforts. Occasionally it’s a very small group (Eames, Wrights).

      Great creative work is usually the product of a single person.

  27. Apr 2020
    1. To read all of the license deeds, or legal codes, visit this site and explore the different licenses. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/

      An excellent resource directly from the Creative Commons site describing the rationale of use, "three-layer" design, license types, and their specific permissions/restrictions. This is a go-to resource before and after completing this course. There is no better documentation for this topic on the internet.

  28. Mar 2020
    1. Do Creative Commons licenses affect exceptions and limitations to copyright, such as fair dealing and fair use?

      This question is such a common one. I don't think most people understand that Creative Commons doesn't replace copyright. At my institution most people seem to think that it's either one or the other and if it is licensed under creative commons, that it is always free to use with no copyright restrictions. This does a nice job of clarifying that.

  29. Dec 2019
    1. At Excellent Webworld our UI/UX designers are always experimenting with the innovative design in buttons and navigation bars. Here is an interactive tab animation for our previous mobile app development project.

    1. In other fields, you can get going after a relatively short time. In mathematics, you can find reputation-making problems that you can actually attack after just a couple of years of college. It is very unlikely that you will make a significant contribution to Shakespeare scholarship before 30. And you’ll read a lot more. Which brings me to the question, once you know what your interests are, how much should you read? How much should you slow down your reading as you age? What is the most fertile ratio of reading to creating? The answer can be tricky. As fields mature, and apparently unsolvable controversies start to dominate (such as has happened at the edge of physics, around superstring theory), a high-paradigm field can become low-paradigm. Subfields can differ: “systems engineering” is lower-paradigm than electrical or mechanical engineering. But Einstein is right about one thing: the “living vicariously” part. That, rather than sheer quantity of reading, is actually the critical part. Depending on what problem you are trying to understand or solve, your reading may take you the rest of your life, or be done in two years. But how you read can determine whether you become a pedantic bore who contributes nothing, or somebody who makes new contributions.

      nuance::reading being a lazy habit of mind

  30. Oct 2019
    1. WHEN it comes to the state of the environment, it’s easy to get swept up in the doom and gloom of it all. Global warming, high pollution levels, climate change and waste disposal all dominate the headlines, painting a bleak picture of what’s to come. But just because it seems hopeless doesn’t mean it is.T roubled times call for ingenious solutions, and Australia is home to some of the brightest ecovators in the world, like Robert Pascoe, Managing Director of environmental solutions company Closed Loop.Through its Simply Cups initiative, Closed Loop is tackling Australia’s overwhelming waste problem by teaming up with 7-Eleven to save 70 million coffee cups from landfill this year — equivalent to the number they sell each year. While the most sustainable option is forgoing a disposable cup for a reusable one, some circumstances are beyond your control. Like your inability to remember anything before you’ve had your morning coffee. Which is a bit of a catch 22, isn’t it? That’s why 7-Eleven are installing dedicated coffee cup recycling bins in over 200 of their stores nationally, as well as funding 50 other large-scale locations including offices, universities and construction sites as part of the initiative. Coffee cups are one of the largest contributors to litter waste in Australia, with an estimated one billion ending up in landfill each year because they are not recycled.Yep, unfortunately you read that right: one billion cups.Coffee cups are one of the largest contributors to litter waste in Australia, with an estimated one billion ending up in landfill each year because they are not recycled.“T here’s a lot of misinformation out there,” Mr Pascoe said. “The consumers aren’t at fault because ultimately they don’t know what can be recycled and what can’t. I think if we can get that information out there, then people will demand products that are made from recycled materials.”For the majority of us, learning that our disposable coffee cups fall into the category of what can’t be recycled is both confusing and devastating. But, as Mr Pascoe says: “You can’t unknow something once you know it.”“Part of the problem is they didn’t know they weren’t being recycled. A lot of people said, ‘oh no, I put my coffee cup into the recycling to be recycled’, but of course, they’re not,” he continued.A nd why is that, exactly? It’s because most paper coffee cups are lined with a waterproof plastic that makes them hard to recycle — but not impossible. And that’s where Simply Cups comes in. “We’ve come up with a system that can actually recycle these cups if we keep them separate. We’ve got technology available now to do it, but we have to have coffee cups kept as a separate stream. Or anything that has the plastic lining of milk cartons or juice boxes,” Mr Pascoe said. The technology he’s referring to is “kind of like an organic solvent” that works to separate compound materials. Invented by Dennis Collins in Ballarat, the technology was initially designed to separate the PVC material from the hessian used in truck liners and advertising banners.“Dennis called us and said, ‘I’ve got a solution for your coffee cups’,” Mr Pascoe said. “So now we’re building a plant that can process around 150 million coffee cups per year, which is about 1.5 thousand tonnes. That will only be about 10 per cent of disposable coffee cups alone, so we’re going to need quite a few of these plants eventually. We have the solution, but we really need the coffee cups. “That’s why we started the Simply Cups program.”And that’s where coffee addicts come in. Once they drop their coffee cups into a designated recycling bin, they will then be taken to a processing plant using this new technology. The inner plastic lining of the cups will be removed and then recycled into things like plastic outdoor furniture, safety equipment and food trays.A nother eco-minded initiative helping solve Australia’s waste problem is the anti food-waste website, Yume. The website fights food waste — which is a huge problem in Australia — by allowing consumers to buy surplus and unsold food from restaurants and cafes at half the price. The ‘wholesale marketplace for surplus food that saves you money while saving the planet’ shares the same idea as ‘YWaste’, an app allowing retailers to sell food that would otherwise be thrown away.Over its 40-year history, Patagonia has donated about $114 million to grassroots environmental organisations. Over its 40-year history, Patagonia has donated about $114 million to grassroots environmental organisations. Their advertising has begged consumers not to buy things they don’t need (even their own products) and they’ve implemented a program that repairs their products for free rather than replace them. Their commitment to the environment is reflected in the materials of their products too; wetsuits are made of natural rubber and raincoats are made from recycled plastic bottles. This year, the company launched Patagonia Action Works, a digital platform that aims that aims to connect people with environmental nonprofits, helping them get involved through events, petitions, and volunteering.H &M, too, are doing their bit to close the loop on fashion waste with their global campaign encouraging customers to recycle their clothes. They launched their garment collecting initiative in 2013, asking customers to drop off any unwanted items from their closets. Depending on the condition of the clothing, the items are either distributed to second-hand stores for resale, or recycled into other items like yarn, rags, and insulation materials.And just look at Elon Musk. He’s raking in bajillions of dollars every minute almost exclusively thanks to Tesla and SolarCity, which have disrupted an entire industry. While some snigger at his grand ideas — let’s colonise Mars! — the accomplishments of how he has changed the way we shop for cars are hard to deny.A fter a complicated relationship with French beauty giant L’Oreal, The Body Shop is now in the hands of ethical Brazilian beauty brand Natura, promising to return to its pioneering ethical business.“All of us share the aim of doing business as a transformational force for good and a force for change for society and for the environment. We couldn’t think of a better union to nurture our brand’s commitment to naturality and sustainability,” said the Body Shop’s Communications Manager, Jessica Styles. “In 2016, The Body Shop launched its new sustainability plan, Enrich Not Exploit, supporting the brand’s vision to be the most ethical and sustainable global business in the world.”“All of us share the aim of doing business as a transformational force for good and a force for change for society and for the environment. We couldn’t think of a better union to nurture our brand’s commitment to naturality and sustainability,”Jessica Styles, Body Shop’s Communications Manager The plan set fourteen targets to help The Body Shop become a "truly sustainable business", including powering all its stores with 100 per cent renewable energy, overhauling product packaging by slashing the use of fossil fuel-based wrapping and designing new sustainable innovations. This year there’s a special focus on protecting Red Pandas in Nepal, a species currently on the endangered list.“Now more than ever, companies have the platforms and frameworks to not only voice doing good for the planet and people but to also act on it. The more we see big brands doing their bit, the more it becomes entrenched as something that not only employees but customers should be thinking about,” Styles said. “It’s the big corporations of the world that can help foster and influence this through their own businesses.” Skin care brand Youth to The People has made a conscience decision to use 100 per cent recyclable packaging. Co-founder Joe Cloyes says the decision reflects the brand’s philosophies.“We believe in creating as little waste as possible, we believe in cruelty-free products, and we believe in sourcing the best ingredients for your health and your skin. It's just that simple,” he said. “Modern consumers care about their environment just as much as they care about their healthy skin, and they're very much connected. We have found it's very important to people.”FIND OUT how many cups of coffee you could be recycling EVEry yearHow many cups of coffee do you drink every day?How many days per week do you drink coffee?How many weeks per year do you drink coffee?Calculatecups of coffeecould be recycled These are but a few eco-minded initiatives that offer Australians the chance to do their part in securing a cleaner future for generations to come. For every company that spills millions of gallons of oil into our oceans, there are plenty more companies operating under a socially responsible ethos. They recognise enterprise and environmental responsibility can in fact go hand-in-hand.“I think every organisation should have a sustainability policy,” Mr Pascoe said. “There are plenty of organisations around that can have a positive impact on the environment. We’re talking about the effect they have on the environment, the way they consume energy, and the way they manage their waste. In my world, there’s no such thing as waste.” Over one billion cups end up in landfill each year because they are not recycled. That’s why 7-Eleven has joined forces with Simply Cups to establish cup recycling in Australia. Save your cups by placing them in a Simply Cups bin at any participating 7-Eleven #cuprescue. Story by Erin Bromhead | news.com.au
  31. Sep 2019
  32. Aug 2019
  33. Jul 2019
    1. e-purpose.

      Creative Commons covers 4 areas of practice: -re-use: right to verbatim reuse content

      • revise: right to change/ modify the content -remix: right to combine original or revised with new content -redistribute: right to make and share copies of content

      great for expanding, exploring, sharing and remixing content in the educational world.

  34. Jan 2019
    1. Curiosity Is as Important as Intelligence

      This one is a pretty bold statement to make, in general.

      Mike Johansson, at Rochester Institute of Technology, makes the case that curiosity is the key to enabling both Creative and Critical Thinking for better problem solving, in general.

      What are some of your ideas?

  35. Dec 2018
    1. New rules always create confusion but that is not a strong argument against them. The legal complexities of CC reflect the complexity of copyright. That the CC licenses are being used suggests that they are useful. The question is how? Claiming they are not useful is unlikely to be correct. Perhaps the usefulness is social not individual, so people are using them to do good. I take no position on this.

      This opinion/ editorial and the resulting dialogue adds some dimension to some of the pro and con arguments for adapting Creative Commons practices.

    1. Why, when we are so worried about preserving freedoms, do we prohibit choice on the part of downstream users as to how they can license derivatives works they make? Why don’t we want to protect that user’s freedom to choose how to license his derivative work, into which he put substantial effort? The copyleft approach of both the Free Software Foundation and Creative Commons makes creators of derivative works second-class citizens. And these are the people we claim to be primarily interested in empowering. I can’t stress this point enough: the ShareAlike clause of the CC licenses and the CopyLeft tack of the GFDL rob derivers of the basic freedom to choose which license they will apply to their derived work. ShareAlike and CopyLeft privilege creators while directing derivers to the back of the bus.

      I think that license compatibility is one of the least user friendly areas in the Creative Commons process. Opening resources while being attributed sounds appealing to educators who are dipping their toes in these concepts. Then we pull out Compatibility Charts and people want to run for the hills! I think that the democracy and openness that Creative Commons embodies should be inclusive and I think it's hard for people to decipher these equations which are so crucial to responsible use.

    1. Today, I had the privilege of speaking on a panel at the Comparative and International Education Society’s Annual Conference with representatives of two open education projects that depend on Creative Commons licenses to do their work. One is the OER publisher Siyavula, based in Cape Town, South Africa. Among other things, they publish textbooks for use in primary and secondary school in math and science. After high school students in the country protested about the conditions of their education – singling out textbook prices as a barrier to their learning – the South African government relied on the Creative Commons license used by Siyavula to print and distribute 10 million Siyavula textbooks to school children, some of whom had never had their own textbook before. The other are the related teacher education projects, TESSA, and TESS-India, which use the Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike license on teacher training materials. Created first in English, the projects and their teachers rely on the reuse rights granted by the Creative Commons license to translate and localize these training materials to make them authentic for teachers in the linguistically and culturally diverse settings of sub-Saharan Africa and India. (Both projects are linked to and supported by the Open University in the UK, http://www.open.ac.uk/, which uses Creative Commons-licensed materials as well.) If one wakes up hoping to feel that one’s work in the world is useful, then an experience like this makes it a good day.

      I think contextualizing Creative Commons material as a component in global justice and thinking of fair distribution of resources and knowledge as an antidote to imperialism is a provocative concept.This blog, infojusticeorg offers perspectives on social justice and Creative Commons by many authors.

    1. User rights Every CC licence allows you to: Copy the work (eg. download, upload, photocopy and scan the work); Distribute the work (eg. provide copies of the work to teachers, students, parents and the community); Display or perform the work (eg. play a sound recording or film in class, or stage a play to parents); Communicate the work (eg. make the work available online on the school intranet, learning management system or on a class blog); and Format shift verbatim copies of the work (eg copy a MP3 version of music onto a CD or an MP4 version of a film onto a DVD to play in class). Source: Adapted from 'Baseline Rights'  http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Baseline_Rights   Some CC licences also let you make other uses, however these are the base user rights provided for all CC material. User obligations When you use any CC material, you must: always attribute the creator of the work (for information on how to attribute a work, see information guide, ‘How to Attribute Creative Commons Material’); get permission from the creator to do anything that goes beyond the terms of the licence (e.g. making a commercial use of the work or creating a derivative work where the licence does not permit this); keep any copyright notice attached to the work intact on all copies of the work; indicate and link to the licence from any copies of the work; and where you make changes to the work, acknowledge the original work and indicate that changes have been made (eg by stating ‘This is a French translation of the original work, X’).   In addition, when you use any CC material, you must not:  alter the terms of the licence; use the work in any way that is prejudicial to the reputation of the creator of the work; imply that the creator is endorsing or sponsoring you or your work; or add any technologies (such as digital rights management) to the work that restrict other people from using it under the terms of the licence. Source:  Adapted from 'Baseline Rights'  http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Baseline_Rights 

      This clear description of the rights conferred by every Creative Commons license and the limitations written into every Creative Commons license provides a clear overview for educators who may be new to Creative Commons licenses. This guide was developed for Australian educators specifically.

    1. That said, for a thoughtful survey of how the commons, cultural and otherwise, might thrive inside of, or along with, with current conditions I recommend Peter Barnes’s book, Capitalism 3.0: A Guide to Reclaiming the Commons. One of Barnes’s points is that our debates about the future often imagine only two actors: the government and private business. Barnes suggests a third set, common property trusts (as, for example, the kind of land trusts devised by the Nature Conservancy). There is much to say about common property trusts but for now the point is simply that we already have a mix of cultural modes and should continue to have them going forward with, I hope, the commons recognized and strengthened.

      One of the areas I find challenging in addressing Creative Commons culture is how Creative Commons relates to capitalistic culture (or rejects it). Creative Commons can be compatible with open market, but it can also challenge some of the fundamental tenants of it. Throughout the units, as I tried to imagine applications of Creative Commons, or making licensing decisions as a creative and academic, I found that I had questions about artists and how they can earn a living in this model, and how this model supported and challenged my role as a librarian in academe.

  36. Nov 2018
    1. Retention and graduation rates increase for community colleges that beef up or get creative with their student advising services.

      Retention and graduation rates increase for community colleges that beef up or get creative with their student advising services.

    1. The author has made an online version of this work available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International Public License. It can be accessed through the author’s website at http://www.twitterandteargas.com.

      A great example of academic samizdat on Zeynep Tufekci's part.

      The free creative commons version is available in the footer link at https://www.twitterandteargas.org/

  37. Oct 2018
    1. As business and the economy becomes ever more complex, the information and data available for lawyers to consider in assisting clients to make strategic decisions will be so vast that unless technology and workflows are correctly harnessed to make sense of it, the information would be useless and impossible to interpret manually.

      Can you think of other industries in which this might also be true? Share illustrations with your class.

    2. So long as there are people willing to push the boundaries of rules, possibilities and limits, lawyers will always have a fundamental role in society and the economy.

      Do some research and find an example of a lawyer "willing to push the boundaries of rules, possibilities, and limits." Share your findings with the class.

    1. gender barriers (physical, cultural, attitudinal)

      What do you think are some of these barriers?

    2. If we can achieve gender balance in the most visible public offices of the land, the rest of the country will follow.

      Do you agree that the writer's proposals will be effective in achieving gender equality? Why or why not? What other ideas do you have for achieving gender equality?

  38. Sep 2018
    1. If we can achieve gender balance in the most visible public offices of the land, the rest of the country will follow.

      Do you agree that the writer's proposals will be effective in achieving gender equality? Why or why not? What other ideas do you have for achieving gender equality?

  39. Aug 2018
    1. 3 Steps for Licensing Your 3d Printed Stuff by Michael Weinberg. CC BY-SA 3.0 A set of instructions for how to license 3d printed materials https://www.publicknowledge.org/assets/uploads/documents/3_Steps_for_Licensing_Your_3D_Printed_Stuff.pdf

      Relevant content in the unit: Unit 3.2, Acquiring Essential Knowledge, What types of content can be CC-licensed, suggested additional content (related to both paragraphs in current content).

      While the primary purpose of this paper is about 3-D printing, this resource is a great overview of copyright law related to electronic files, whether they be photographs or the files for a 3-D printing project.

      This is an especially good resource for those interested in specific examples of the delineation of the functional, non-copyrightable aspect of a work and the artistic expression, copyrightable aspects of a work.

    2. What happens if I offer my material under a Creative Commons license and someone misuses them? https://creativecommons.org/faq/#what-happens-if-i-offer-my-material-under-a-creative-commons-license-and-someone-misuses-them

      I'm not sure this FAQ response actually addresses the question.

      Most of the questions I get from faculty and OER advocates who work with faculty are fear-based about their reputation. I get questions like (put more bluntly than I usually get, these are the ultimate questions after a lot of back and forth):

      What if someone takes the history content I wrote and manipulates it a political position I don’t agree with? Won’t that reflect poorly on me?

      What if someone takes my math book and modifies it and makes mistakes? Won’t that reflect poorly on me if someone finds the modified version with mistakes and my name is attached to it?

      I think things like the above examples are what people are mostly asking when they ask about "misuse."

  40. Jul 2018
    1. I also think as educators we should own what we make, or at least have it released to the Commons. Copyright on teacher created materials in the public school makes little sense. Nobody wants to steal your stuff and no municipality will ever profit on sales. Give it an open license.
    1. http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ01.pdf

      I prefer sources that are short and to the point, with links allowing me to explore various topics if  I need to.  This piece goes over all of the basics of creating and maintaining a copyright license. While that is not the objective, typically, of someone taking a Creative Commons course, it helps to see this information from a pro-copyright perspective to understand all sides of the issue.

      It's also a primary source, meaning that the department issuing the copyrights in the United States also wrote this piece, which means it should be as accurate as possible.

  41. May 2018
  42. Apr 2018
    1. For creative professionals, however, particularly those burdened by economic hardship, the risks associated with transitioning to a non-proprietary business model can feel (rightly or wrongly) prohibitive.

      Opposition from these groups killed the Eldred Act. Failure of what became Eldred v. Ashcroft gave rise both to the attempt to have this act passed and to the formation of Creative Commons.