60 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2022
    1. the thing is about vision, same with the ear, you can only see a few at a time in detail, but you can be aware of 100 things at once. So one of the things we're really bad about is, because of our eyes, you can't get the visual point of view we want. Our eyes have a visual point of view of like 160 degrees. But what I've got here is about 25, and on a cellphone it's pathetic. So this is completely wrong. 100% wrong. Wrong in a really big way. If you look at the first description that Engelbart ever wrote about what he wanted, it was a display that was three feet on its side, built into a desk, because what is it that you design on? If anybody's ever looked at a drafting table, which they may not have for a long time, you need room to design, because there's all this bullshit that you do wrong, right?

      !- insight for : user interface design - 3 feet field of view is critical - 160 degrees - VR and AR is able to meet this requirement

  2. Feb 2022
    1. https://dancohen.org/2019/07/23/engagement-is-the-enemy-of-serendipity/

      Dan Cohen talks about a design change in the New York Times app that actively discourages exploration and discovery by serendipity.

      This is similar to pulling out digital copies of books you're looking for instead of going to the library, tracking down the book on the shelf and in the process seeing and experiencing the books on the shelf which are nearby, or even the book that catches your eye across the aisle, wasn't in your sphere of search or interest, but you pick it up anyway.

      How can we bring this sort of design back to digital experiences?

      It's not just the algorithmic feeds which are narrowing our interests and exposure, but the design of our digital spaces as well.

  3. Jan 2022
    1. Here comes 2022, and as usual, we have prepared for you the list of the top UI/UX design trends to follow. Design in the coming year is about taking care of users, their uniqueness, and avoiding the “perfect picture”. Therefore, real-life photos, live artistic illustrations, and asymmetry are gaining more popularity. And by the way, did you know that according to Pantone, the color of 2022 is violet (Very Peri)? Let’s now explore the leading UI/UX design trends of 2022 in detail and see how popular brands successfully implement them.
  4. Nov 2021
    1. My UIs are data/store driven. The UI is just a way to visualize the data. Your data could flow through all of of the extensions and the extensions can make decisions (e.g. setting visible to false). Like middlewares in a Connect/Express/Polka app. And the UI doesn't even know about all this, it just updates with the current state and makes sure it's consistent.
  5. Aug 2021
    1. Every UI developer has been asked many times, “What process do you follow to design a mobile app?” This article gives you a standard mobile app UI design process to follow.
  6. Jun 2021
    1. Persistent navigation drawers can toggle open or closed. The drawer sits on the same surface elevation as the content. It is closed by default and opens by selecting the menu icon, and stays open until closed by the user. The state of the drawer is remembered from action to action and session to session. When the drawer is outside of the page grid and opens, the drawer forces other content to change size and adapt to the smaller viewport.
  7. May 2021
    1. The conversational feed design of email inboxes, group chats, and InstaTwitBook is fleeting – they're only concerned with self-assertive immediate thoughts that rush by us in a few moments.

      The streamification of the web had already taken hold enough by this point. Anil Dash had an essay in 2012 entitled Stop Publishing Web Pages which underlined this point.

    1. Charlotte Jee recently wrote a lovely fictional intro to a piece on a “feminist Internet” that crystallized something I can’t quite believe I never saw before; if girls, women and non-binary people really got to choose where they spent their time online, we would never choose to be corralled into the hostile, dangerous spaces that endanger us and make us feel so, so bad. It’s obvious when you think about it. The current platforms are perfectly designed for misogyny and drive literally countless women from public life, or dissuade them from entering it. Online abuse, doxing, blue-tick dogpiling, pro-stalking and rape-enabling ‘features’ (like Strava broadcasting runners’ names and routes, or Slack’s recent direct-messaging fiasco) only happen because we are herded into a quasi-public sphere where we don’t make the rules and have literally nowhere else to go.

      A strong list of toxic behaviors that are meant to keep people from having a voice in the online commons. We definitely need to design these features out of our social software.

  8. Apr 2021
    1. Hammy wasn’t born in our fantasies, but in a Silicon Valley office.

      Per Yoni De Beule, UI (user interface) developer at Yelp: "Why a hamster? Why not a hamster!" . This quote gives some insight into how this design style is viewed internally (at least at the developer level) - it's not really a matter of deliberate infantilization or overtly sinister - although the end result - infantilization of the user (and all the broader cultural impacts this infantilization creates) is definitely not a neutral outcome.

      Source: Quora. “Why Does the Yelp Ios App Use Hamsters in Their Loading Animations and Error Screens?,” January 14, 2014. https://www.forbes.com/sites/quora/2014/01/14/why-does-the-yelp-ios-app-use-hamsters-in-their-loading-animations-and-error-screens/?sh=3253fefa462c.

    1. I LOVE the hover effects for the book covers on this site which is also a great example of someone collecting highlights/annotations of the books they read and hosting them in public on their personal website.

      Melanie has written about the CSS part of the hover effect here: https://melanie-richards.com/blog/highlights-minisite/ and like all awesome things, she's got the site open at https://github.com/melanierichards/highlights. I may have to do some serious digging for figuring out how she's creating the .svg images for the covers though.

    1. An example of this would be a button that looks clickable but isn’t, underlined text that doesn’t contain a link, or a TV remote that turns on your lights but not the TV. False affordances are often present by mistake or occur due to lack of effective design techniques.
    2. “when affordances are taken advantage of, the user knows what to do just by looking: no picture, label, or instruction needed.”
    1. And some VR designs are literally spaces of floating panels.

      The laziest, but often most practical VR design

    1. Hérigone's only important work is the six volume Cursus mathematicus, nova, brevi, et clara methodo demonstratus Ⓣ<span class="non-italic">(</span>Course on mathematics : new, short, and with clear methods shown<span class="non-italic">)</span> or, to give it its French title, Cours mathematique, demonstre d'une nouvelle, briefve, et claire methode which appeared between 1634 and 1642.

      There is a clever little bit of UI on this page in which there appears a red letter T in a circle after the Latin title. If one clicks it ,there's a pop up of the translation of the title into English.

  9. Mar 2021
    1. Thrive Away. If a Thrive employee sends an e-mail to a colleague who is on vacation, the sender receives a note that the colleague is away and the message is automatically deleted. In theory, a simple vacation auto-responder should be sufficient—as it tells people sending a message not to expect a reply until the recipient returns—but logic is subservient in this situation. No matter what the expectations, the awareness that there are messages waiting somewhere triggers anxiety, ruining the potential relaxation of a person’s time off. The only cure is to prevent the messages from arriving altogether.

      A fascinating potential solution to the email problem. This is focused on the company space, but how might one decentralize this for use in all email scenarios?

  10. Feb 2021
    1. But what if leadership not only ignores our recommendations but tells us to do something different? I'll never forget one comment. "We're lying to our users," one anguished UX designer told me, explaining that leadership regularly ordered the UX team to create designs that were intentionally misleading. Apparently it helped boost profits.
  11. Jan 2021
    1. The past few years seems to have be a race between Microsoft and various players in the Linux world to see who can produce the worst abomination of a UI. It's as if there's been a ritualistic burning of the UI design rule book that led to many years of largely stable and consistent user experience across all platforms
  12. Dec 2020
  13. Nov 2020
  14. Oct 2020
    1. The demand for top-notch app UI designers is so high that nowadays, companies hire UI designers explicitly separate from the development team. This way, they can be sure that the app gets the best designing resources.

      We often come across stunning apps; some catch our eyes for their color palette while some have unique transition effects, and so on. So, let’s find out what will be the most popular UI design trends of 2020.

  15. Sep 2020
  16. Aug 2020
    1. To the fact, 77% of the users will stop using an app within 3 days of its download. Only those apps will survive who have soothing mobile usability and UX/UI designs.
    1. So, let’s get an answer to this question! In this write-up, we will be going through mobile app design services and its cost.

    1. Merge is a revolutionary technology that lets users import and keep in sync coded React.js components from GIT repositories to the UXPin Editor. Imported components are 100% identical to the components used by developers during the development process. It means that components are going to look, feel and function (interactions, data) just like the real product experienced by the end-users.
  17. Jul 2020
  18. Feb 2020
    1. Top 10 Design Skills Every UX/UI Designer Must Have

      You might have got this in your mind while hiring UX/UI designers that what skills should they possess. To give you a clear idea on it, here I’ve listed a few UX/UI design skills, that every designer must-have.

  19. Jan 2020
  20. Dec 2019
  21. Nov 2019
    1. This blog is aimed to help you figure out the most common UX fails that breakdown the mobile experience. Make sure to learn from the mistakes done by others and create a UX that would be loved and appreciated by the majority of your target audience.

  22. Oct 2019
  23. Sep 2019
  24. Jun 2019
    1. Фильтрация предполагает, что количество записей, после её применения, изменится. Формулировка кнопок фильтрации должна отвечать на вопрос «Что я получу после применения фильтрации?»: новое, мои записи, рестораны, непрочитанные письма и т. д. Применение сортировки не изменяет количество записей. Записи лишь меняют свой порядок. Формулировка должна отвечать на вопрос «По какому принципу упорядочены записи?»: по дате публикации, по рейтингу, в случайном порядке.
  25. Feb 2019
  26. Jan 2019
  27. Sep 2018
    1. Atomic Design details all that goes into creating and maintaining robust design systems, allowing you to roll out higher quality, more consistent UIs faster than ever before. This book introduces a methodology for thinking of our UIs as thoughtful hierarchies, discusses the qualities of effective pattern libraries, and showcases techniques to transform your team's design and development workflow.
  28. Apr 2017
  29. Nov 2015
    1. Dramatic statistics about the negative impact of hiding key navigation options out of the main view in mobile apps.

    1. The onboarding flow can be designed in many other ways that might be more useful to your users. Slack, for instance, uses the first screen to create some context. They simply introduce themselves, focusing on benefits instead of screens and features.
    2. That’s why now all the big players are shifting from hamburger menus towards making the most relevant navigation options always visible.

      Interesting example of YouTube switching away from the hamburger menu.

    1. There is a lot of evidence that quite subtle changes to user interfaces can have dramatic effects on how the interfaces are used. For example, the size of a search box or the text that accompanies it can considerably influence the queries that people submit.

      -- David Elsweller

    2. The whole gendered usage of hearts seems to have escaped Twitter. So does the fact that people fave (with stars) in complex ways - they are bookmarks, they are likes, they are nods of the head. But they are not indicators of love. I feel very weird loving tweets by random men I've only just started a conversation with. Not that there's anything wrong with feminine. But women - and men, in their own ways - are well-aware of how feminized visual signals get read by others, and in an identity space like Twitter, I suspect that will really minimize usage. Or at least until we all get used to it.

      -- Bonnie Stewart