26 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. a more nuanced view of context.

      Almost every new technology goes through a moral panic phase where the unknown is used to spawn potential backlashes against it. Generally these disappear with time and familiarity with the technology.

      Bicycles cause insanity, for example...

      Why does medicine and vaccines not follow more of this pattern? Is it lack of science literacy in general which prevents it from becoming familiar for some?

  2. Sep 2022
  3. Aug 2022
    1. Wittgenstein makes a similar observation, pointing out that “the aspects ofthings that are most important for us are hidden because of their simplicity andfamiliarity (one is unable to notice something – because it is always beforeone’s eyes).” 3
    2. Phenomena can be so familiar that wereally do not see them at all, a matter that has been much discussed by literarytheorists and philosophers. For example, Viktor Shklovskij in the early 1920sdeveloped the idea that the function of poetic art is that of “making strange”the object depicted. “People living at the seashore grow so accustomed to themurmur of the waves that they never hear it. By the same token, we scarcelyever hear the words which we utter . . . We look at each other, but we do not seeeach other any more. Our perception of the world has withered away; what hasremained is mere recognition.”

      Fish in water effect

    1. https://universitylifecafe.k-state.edu/bookshelf/academicskills/indexcardstudysystem.html

      Natalie Umberger is writing about an "index card study system" in an academic study skills context, but it's an admixture of come ideas from Cornell Notes and using index cards as flashcards.

      The advice to "Review your notes and readings frequently, so the material is 'fresh.' " is a common one (through at least the 1980s to the present), though research on the mere-exposure effect indicates that it's not as valuable as other methods.

      How can we stamp out the misconception that this sort of review is practical?

  4. Jun 2022
    1. the research says is that students often

      the research says is that students often don't use the right learning strategy because they react negatively to effort in fact it even is so well demonstrated that it has its own name it's called the ==misinterpreted effort hypothesis== it says that students tend to see a learning strategy feel that it is more effortful more challenging and as a result they will veer away from that because they feel that that effort means that they're either doing it wrong or that the technique is bad they consider more effortful learning with being a bad thing

      Students will perceive learning strategies that require more effort and work on their part to be less productive in the long term, often when the opposite is the case. This phenomenon is known as the misinterpreted effort hypothesis.

      Link to: - research in Ahrens that rereading and reviewing over material seems easy, but isn't as effective as directly answering questions and performing the work to produce one's own answer. - https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0010028519302270

  5. Feb 2022
    1. psychologists call the mere-exposure effect: doing something many times makes us believe wehave become good at it – completely independent of our actualperformance (Bornstein 1989). We unfortunately tend to confusefamiliarity with skill.

      The mere-exposure effect leads us to confuse familiarity with a process with actual skill.

  6. Sep 2021
  7. Aug 2021
  8. Jun 2021
    1. Rather than write new tooling we decided to take advantage of tooling we had in place for our unit tests. Our unit tests already used FactoryBot, a test data generation library, for building up test datasets for a variety of test scenarios. Plus, we had already built up a nice suite of helpers that we coud re-use. By using tools and libraries already a part of the backend technology’s ecosystem we were able to spend less time building additional tooling. We had less code to maintain because of this and more time to work on solving our customer’s pain points.
    2. The problem domain and the data involved in this project was complicated enough. We decided that not having to worry about unknowns with the frontend end-to-end testing stack helped mitigate risk. This isn’t to say you should always going with the tool you know, but in this instance we felt it was the right choice.
    3. This particular project team came in with a lot of experience using testing tools like RSpec and Capybara. This included integrating with additional tools like Selenium WebDriver, Chrome and Chromedriver, data generation libraries like FactoryBot, and task runners like Rake. We had less experience doing end-to-end testing with Protractor even though it too uses Selenium WebDriver (a tool we’re very comfortable with).
    4. There are times to stretch individually and as a team, but there are also times to take advantage of what you already know.
  9. Feb 2021
    1. The fact we’re using ActiveRecord (or something looking like it) doesn’t mean Trailblazer only works with Rails! Most people are familiar with its API, so we chose to use “ActiveRecord” in this tutorial.
  10. Jan 2021
    1. Familiar interfaces borrow from well-established patterns. These should be used consistently within the interface to reinforce their meaning and purpose. This should be applied to functionality, behavior, editorial, and presentation. You should say the same things in the same way and users should be able to do the same things in the same way.
  11. Dec 2020
  12. Nov 2020
    1. It's friendlier to contributors. Dart is substantially easier to learn than Ruby, and many Sass users in Google in particular are already familiar with it. More contributors translates to faster, more consistent development.
  13. Oct 2020
    1. If the react cargo cult didn't have the JSX cowpath paved for them and acclimated to describing their app interface with vanilla javascript, they'd cargo cult around that. It's really about the path of least resistance and familiarity.
    2. The only "issue" it has is that its unfamiliar. People have been working with HTML for years and are comfortable with it. That's basically the only reason that people find it more readable. If you make an effort to spend sometime with hyperscript, it becomes as familiar and readable as jsx.
  14. Sep 2020
  15. Jun 2020
  16. Apr 2020
  17. Dec 2018
    1. But the reason I wanted to go back in that moment was the same reason students want to stick with familiar grading systems: I know how it works, I know how to communicate about it, I know how to get the best results from it, and it sticks within the letter-grading system I’ve used for 20 years as a teacher and longer as a student. I can recite all the dangers and disadvantages of letter grading, but because it’s the system I’ve known for pretty much my entire life, there’s still a certain comfort to it, and whenever things get weird or challenging or unpredictable, I get an atavistic desire to go back to what is familiar.

      This is beautiful - acknowledging discomfort on the part of both teacher and student.