482 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2024
    1. The initial focus is on the learner’s home language (it’s currently being piloted with grade 3 isiZulu-speaking learners at a school in Soweto, Johannesburg). English is introduced gradually as a target language. The language and speech technology has been developed to provide linguistic accuracy and is grounded in teaching principles.

      This application is for Grade 3 and up. It doesn't solve the problem I identified which is by Grade 2 most learners can't read for meaning. Stepping in early is key so there is still viability for an application like mine.

  2. Feb 2024
  3. Dec 2023
    1. When subjects are instructed togenerate a random sequence of hypotheticaltosses of a fair coin

      for example, they produce sequences where the proportion of heads in any short segment stays far closer to 0.5 than the laws of chance would predict (Tune, 1964) // Thus, each segment of the response sequence is highly representative of the "fairness" of the coin

      • Could this be a nice idea to have student predict 10 consecutive coin toss outcomes and compare to a simulation?
      • Explain concepts of probability, intuition of "representative" sampling

      Subjects act as if every segment of the random sequence must reflect the true proportion: if the sequence has strayed from the population proportion, a corrective bias in the other direction is expected. This has beenc alled the gambler's fallacy.

  4. Nov 2023
    1. 最近,我教過的學生們,有幾位開始變成中小學老師。這些同學們在我的課堂上到課率很低。我一直都不想去要求學生來上課,因為我自己當年到課率也是超低。所以我很早就用網路教學,一開始是用 YouTube 錄影後上傳,後來變直播,現在則改用 facebook 直播。奇特的是,他們說受我影響很深,教學的方法與理念都從我這裡獲益良多 ....這讓我想起一句話:If you would like to be good at something, teach it !

      If you would like to be good at something, teach it.

    1. Live-Roaming: Using Roam to teach students in college

      I'd listened to this whole episode sometime since 2022-04-05, but didn't put it in my notes.

      Mark Robertson delineates how he actively models the use of his note taking practice (using Roam Research) while teaching/lecturing in the classroom. This sort of modeling can be useful for showing students how academics read, gather, and actively use their knowledge. It does miss the portion about using the knowledge to create papers, articles, books, etc., but the use of this mode of reading and notes within a discussion setting isn't terribly different.

      Use of the system for conversation/discussion with the authors of various texts as you read, with your (past) self as you consult your own notes, or your students in classroom lectures/discussion sections is close to creating your own discussion for new audiences (by way of the work your write yourself.)

      https://www.buzzsprout.com/1194506/4875515-mark-robertson-history-socratic-dialogue-live-roaming.mp3

    1. he also demonstrated unfailing empathy andgenuine commitment to their progress.

      this is a good start at a definition of teaching

  5. Oct 2023
    1. just as there is a difference in the art of teaching indifferent fields, so there is a reciprocal difference in the art ofbeing taught.

      Analogy of reading (and learning) to teaching.

  6. Sep 2023
    1. Recent work has revealed several new and significant aspects of the dynamics of theory change. First, statistical information, information about the probabilistic contingencies between events, plays a particularly important role in theory-formation both in science and in childhood. In the last fifteen years we’ve discovered the power of early statistical learning.

      The data of the past is congruent with the current psychological trends that face the education system of today. Developmentalists have charted how children construct and revise intuitive theories. In turn, a variety of theories have developed because of the greater use of statistical information that supports probabilistic contingencies that help to better inform us of causal models and their distinctive cognitive functions. These studies investigate the physical, psychological, and social domains. In the case of intuitive psychology, or "theory of mind," developmentalism has traced a progression from an early understanding of emotion and action to an understanding of intentions and simple aspects of perception, to an understanding of knowledge vs. ignorance, and finally to a representational and then an interpretive theory of mind.

      The mechanisms by which life evolved—from chemical beginnings to cognizing human beings—are central to understanding the psychological basis of learning. We are the product of an evolutionary process and it is the mechanisms inherent in this process that offer the most probable explanations to how we think and learn.

      Bada, & Olusegun, S. (2015). Constructivism Learning Theory : A Paradigm for Teaching and Learning.

    1. Nobody, however, who surveys the conventional working apparatus of courses of study, textbooks, recitations, examinations, and marks can have much doubt that in practice the schools are making the mastery of the curriculum an end in itself.

      A statement of "teaching to the test" in 1939!

  7. Jun 2023
    1. college students engage with and consume more content than at any time in history. It just so happens that this content is delivered by a streaming service, video game or social media platform, not by a college instructor.
    2. Student engagement is one of the strongest leading indicators we have of positive learning outcomes. Consequently, when students are disengaged, they are less likely to achieve their learning goals.
  8. May 2023
    1. Santalucia, Nick. “The Zettelkasten in the Secondary Classroom.” Blog, July 6, 2021. https://www.nicksantalucia.com/blog/the-zettelkasten-in-the-secondary-classroom-k12.

    2. Hyper-zettelkastenStudents stick all of their zettels on the walls with sticky tack or tape (be sure students initial or mark their zettels before doing this).Then, students walk around the room and search for connections and create original ideas using those connections.Students physically attach those zettels with string (like a conspiracy theorist would) and stick a zettel on the string explaining the connection.
    1. ObsidianI am an academic, so a critic might say that intellectual masturbation is kind of my job description. That said, yes, I am using my ZK all the time to create stuff. Oftentimes, "stuff" may be less tangible things like inspiration for a discussion with my team or with students. But my ZK also helps me tremendously for writing papers and grant proposals because now a lot of my thinking can happen before I start writing. More precisely, of course I had done a lot of thinking even before I ever used a ZK, but now I can record, retrieve, and elaborate these thoughts easily so that they accumulate over time to something bigger. Now, writing a paper or grant proposal often comes down to concatenating a bunch of notes. Ok, maybe that's a bit exaggerated, it still does take some extra editing, but you catch my drift.It took me some experimenting but now I can't imagine going back to my pre-Zettelkasten way of working.

      reply to u/enabeh at https://www.reddit.com/r/Zettelkasten/comments/13s6dsg/comment/jluovm9/?utm_source=reddit&utm_medium=web2x&context=3

      If you're curious, I've been collecting examples of teachers/professors who used their zettelkasten for teaching: https://hypothes.is/users/chrisaldrich?q=tag%3A%27card+index+for+teaching%27 Examples include Mario Bunge, Frederic L. Paxson, Gotthard Deutsch, Roland Barthes, and Joachim Jungius. In more recent contexts, I've seen Dan Allosso (aka u/danallosso), Mark Robertson (aka calhistorian u/calhistorian), and Sean Graham (https://electricarchaeology.ca/) using zettelkasten or linked notes using Obsidian, Roam, etc. for teaching. Perhaps we should get the group together to trade stories? Ping me with an email if you're interested.

    1. framework for making claims with evidence. The simplest of which, which is what I use, is Claim-Evidence-Reasoning (CER). Students are taught to state their claim (The theme of the story is X), support it with evidence (Readers can infer this through the story's plot, particularly...), and explain their reasoning (Because the character's action result in X, ...) Another great framework is The Writing Revolution/The Hochman Method's "single paragraph outline". Students need to be taught that these are the units of thought -- the most basic forms of an argument. And, even before this, they need to know that a sentence is the form of an idea.
    1. https://pressbooks.pub/illuminated/

      A booklet prepared for teachers that introduces key concepts from the Science of Learning (i.e. cognitive neuroscience). The digital booklet is the result of a European project. Its content have been compiled from continuing professional development workshops for teachers and features evidence-based teaching practices that align with our knowledge of the Science of Learning.

    1. I've been using index cards for tracking reading notes (lit or bib notes now) and I want to change this topic of index cards over to the Z system. In the past, the main section was "writing" and two subsections, "nonfiction" and "fiction". They are all how-to. I have some main notes but most are from every writing book published which I've read in the last 10 years (yep, shelves full). Approx. 3000 index cards, maybe more, with lots of sub-subsection, etc. I've been teaching writing for the last 10+ years and would love to connect the dots easier now than I have in the past. On the list, I couldn't find the recommended category to place these under. Maybe productivity is in there somewhere. I'm working on a mind map structure now. Any thoughts or advice on this? Anyone else done this?

      Has your prior system not been working for you? What do you want to gain from making the change? What list are you looking at that you don't see a category? Isn't the category "writing", "fiction writing", "nonfiction writing", etc.?

  9. Apr 2023
    1. How Gertrude Teaches herChildren

      Swiss educator Johann Pestalozzi (1746-1827) developed a holistic teaching philosophy in How Gertrude Teaches Her Children based on John Locke's ideas and used it to open his own schools.

      See copies at https://archive.org/details/texts?query=How+Gertrude+Teaches+Her+

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Heinrich_Pestalozzi

  10. Mar 2023
    1. As a teacher of English to secondary school students, and as an online doctoral student, I am excited to explore and possibly integrate Hypothesis into my work. I love research and everything involved with it. Thank you to the creators of this tool --

  11. Feb 2023
    1. Scaling neural network models—making them bigger—has made their faux writing more and more authoritative-sounding, but not more and more truthful.

      Yes -- distinguishing the more realistic from more truthful. That's where the conversation should be.

  12. Jan 2023
    1. 个人学习可能取决于他人行为的主张突出了将学习环境视为一个涉及多个互动参与者的系统的重要性
    1. Around 1956: "My next task was to prepare my course. Since none of the textbooks known to me was satisfactory, I resorted to the maieutic method that Plato had attributed to Socrates. My lectures consisted essentially in questions that I distributed beforehand to the students, and an abstract of the research that they had prompted. I wrote each question on a 6 × 8 card. I had adopted this procedure a few years earlier for my own work, so I did not start from scratch. Eventually I filled several hundreds of such cards, classed them by subject, and placed them in boxes. When a box filled up, it was time to write an article or a book chapter. The boxes complemented my hanging-files cabinet, containing sketches of papers, some of them aborted, as well as some letters." (p. 129)

      This sounds somewhat similar to Mark Robertson's method of "live Roaming" (using Roam Research during his history classes) as a teaching tool on top of other prior methods.

      link to: Roland Barthes' card collection for teaching: https://hypothes.is/a/wELPGLhaEeywRnsyCfVmXQ

  13. Dec 2022
    1. My freely downloadable Beginning Mathematical Logic is a Study Guide, suggesting introductory readings beginning at sub-Masters level. Take a look at the main introductory suggestions on First-Order Logic, Computability, Set Theory as useful preparation. Tackling mid-level books will help develop your appreciation of mathematical approaches to logic.

      This is a reference to a great book "Beginning Mathematical Logic: A Study Guide [18 Feb 2022]" by Peter Smith on "Teach Yourself Logic A Study Guide (and other Book Notes)". The document itself is called "LogicStudyGuide.pdf".

      It focuses on mathematical logic and can be a gateway into understanding Gödel's incompleteness theorems.

      I found this some time ago when looking for a way to grasp the difference between first-order and second-order logics. I recall enjoying his style of writing and his commentary on the books he refers to. Both recollections still remain true after rereading some of it.

      It both serves as an intro to and recommended reading list for the following: - classical logics - first- & second-order - modal logics - model theory<br /> - non-classical logics - intuitionistic - relevant - free - plural - arithmetic, computability, and incompleteness - set theory (naïve and less naïve) - proof theory - algebras for logic - Boolean - Heyting/pseudo-Boolean - higher-order logics - type theory - homotopy type theory

  14. Nov 2022
    1. These labor actions underscored the frustrations of teachers, who have had to navigate not only the pandemic but also political harangues about their curricula, as well as insufficient pay and other long-standing issues tied to their actual work as educators. Teachers were already leaving the profession, but stress induced by the pandemic accelerated the pace.
    1. Applying the self-determination theory (SDT) to explain student engagement in online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic

      -I will download the full article in EBSCO

      -This article will give me insight into how the self-determination theory helped with student engagement during the online learning they received during covid pandemic.

      -rating 7/10

      Chiu, T. K. (2022). Applying the self-determination theory (SDT) to explain student engagement in online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 54(sup1), S14-S30.

    1. Leading and Teaching with Technology: School Principals' Perspective

      This article will provide me with insight into how the use of technology has changed in the grade school education system based on principals' perspectives.

      rating 8/10

      Ugur, N. G., & Koç, T. (2019). Leading and Teaching with Technology: School Principals' Perspective. International Journal of Educational Leadership and Management, 7(1), 42-71.

    1. Teachers’ Use of Technology in Elementary Reading Lessons

      -I will download this full article through EBSCO

      -This article will provide me with teaching strategies that use technology in elementary reading lessons.

      -rating 8/10

      McDermott, P., & Gormley, K. A. (2016). Teachers’ use of technology in elementary reading lessons. Reading Psychology, 37(1), 121-146.

    1. Elementary Teachers’ Views about Teaching Design, Engineering, and Technology

      This article will provide me with insight on the views elementary teachers have on design, engineering and technology.

      rating 8/10

      Hsu, M. C., Purzer, S., & Cardella, M. E. (2011). Elementary teachers’ views about teaching design, engineering, and technology. Journal of Pre-College Engineering Education Research (J-PEER), 1(2), 5.

    1. Elementary School Teachers and Teaching with Technology

      This article will provide me insight into teaching with technology at the elementary school level.

      rating 6/10

      Varol, F. (2013). Elementary School Teachers and Teaching with Technology. Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology-TOJET, 12(3), 85-90.

    1. Putting transformative learning theory into practice
      • I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article will provide me with examples of how transformative learning theory can be put into practice in higher education settings and its limitations.

      -rating 7/10

      Christie, M., Carey, M., Robertson, A., & Grainger, P. (2015). Putting transformative learning theory into practice. Australian journal of adult learning, 55(1), 9-30.

    1. Experiential Learning Theory as a Guide for Experiential Educators in Higher Education

      This article will provide me with an overview of the experiential learning theory and how it can be applied to higher education settings.

      -rating 8/10

      Kolb, A. Y., & Kolb, D. A. (2017). Experiential learning theory as a guide for experiential educators in higher education. Experiential Learning & Teaching in Higher Education, 1(1), 7-44.

    1. Examining some assumptions and limitations of research on the effects of emerging technologies for teaching and learning in higher education

      -I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article will give me perspective on the limitations of current research on teaching and learning with technology in higher education settings.

      -rating 8/10

      Kirkwood, A., & Price, L. (2013). Examining some assumptions and limitations of research on the effects of emerging technologies for teaching and learning in higher education. British Journal of Educational Technology, 44(4), 536-543.

    1. The integration of information technology in higher education: a study of faculty's attitude towards IT adoption in the teaching process

      -This article will provide me with insight as to faculty's attitudes towards adopting new technologies and incorporating them in higher education settings.

      -rating 7/10

      John, S. P. (2015). The integration of information technology in higher education: A study of faculty's attitude towards IT adoption in the teaching process. Contaduría y administración, 60, 230-252.

    1. Teaching with Technology: Using Tpack to Understand Teaching Expertise in Online Higher Education

      -I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article provides an overview of how midwestern university professors use technology and teaching pedagogies to teach online courses.

      -rating 7/10

      Benson, S. N. K., & Ward, C. L. (2013). Teaching with technology: Using TPACK to understand teaching expertise in online higher education. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 48(2), 153-172.

    2. Teaching with Technology: Using Tpack to Understand Teaching Expertise in Online Higher Education

      -I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article provides an overview of how midwestern university professors use technology and teaching pedagogies to teach online courses.

      -rating 7/10

    1. Using technology for teaching and learning in higher education: a critical review of the role of evidence in informing practice

      -I will download the full article in EBSCO.

      -This article will provide me with insight into whether the use of technology in higher education classrooms is effective.

      -rating 6/10

      Price, L., & Kirkwood, A. (2014). Using technology for teaching and learning in higher education: A critical review of the role of evidence in informing practice. Higher Education Research & Development, 33(3), 549-564.

    1. Teaching and technology in higher education: student perceptions and personal reflections

      -I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article provides insight to students perspectives of how they learned with technology in their higher education classrooms.

      -rating 7/10

      Milliken, J., & Barnes, L. P. (2002). Teaching and technology in higher education: student perceptions and personal reflections. Computers & Education, 39(3), 223-235.

    1. Teaching with technology in higher education: understanding conceptual change and development in practice
      • I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article will provide me with insight on how to use technology to teach in higher education settings. This presents what conceptual change means and how it has been used in higher education settings.

      -rating 6/10

      Englund, C., Olofsson, A. D., & Price, L. (2017). Teaching with technology in higher education: understanding conceptual change and development in practice. Higher Education Research & Development, 36(1), 73-87.

    1. Teaching excellence in higher education: critical perspectives

      -This article will provide me insight on what excellent teaching looks like in higher education settings.

      -rating 6/10

      Gourlay, L., & Stevenson, J. (2017). Teaching excellence in higher education: Critical perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education, 22(4), 391-395.

  15. www.middlesex.mass.edu www.middlesex.mass.edu
    1. Student Involvement: A Developmental Theoryfor Higher Education

      -This article will provide me with an overview of the learning theory known as student involvement and how it can be used in higher education settings.

      -rating 7/10

      Astin, A. W. (1984). Student involvement: A developmental theory for higher education. Journal of college student personnel, 25(4), 297-308.

    1. Evaluation of competence-based teaching in higher education: From theory to practice

      -I will download full article through EBSCO.

      -This article will provide me with insight on the evaluation of competence-based teaching theory in higher education and how it is put into practice.

      -rating 8/10

      Bergsmann, E., Schultes, M. T., Winter, P., Schober, B., & Spiel, C. (2015). Evaluation of competence-based teaching in higher education: From theory to practice. Evaluation and program planning, 52, 1-9.

    1. How should the higher education workforce adapt to advancements in technology for teaching and learning?

      -I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article will provide me with insight into how to use technology for teaching and learning in higher education settings.

      -rating 8/10

      Kukulska-Hulme, A. (2012). How should the higher education workforce adapt to advancements in technology for teaching and learning?. The Internet and Higher Education, 15(4), 247-254.

  16. Oct 2022
    1. Sein Nachlass umfasst u. a. Notizen zu allen wichtigen naturphilosophischen Fragen seiner Zeit und Briefwechsel mit seinen Schülern, die sich an den verschiedenen Universitäten des protestantischen Deutschlands und der Niederlande aufhielten. Er schrieb Literaturauszüge, Beobachtungsmitschriften, Vorlesungsvorbereitungen und anderes mehr auf kleine Zettel, von denen heute noch knapp 42.000 in der Stabi erhalten sind.

      machine translation (Google):

      His estate includes i.a. Notes on all important natural-philosophical questions of his time and correspondence with his students who stayed at the various universities in Protestant Germany and the Netherlands. He wrote excerpts from literature, observation notes, lecture preparations and other things on small pieces of paper, of which almost 42,000 are still preserved in the Stabi today.

      Die Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Hamburg Carl von Ossietzky (Stabi) houses the almost 42,000 slips of paper from Joachim Jungius' lifetime collection of notes which include excerpts from his reading, observational notes, his lecture preparations, and other miscellaneous notes.

    1. Would doing so, signal that we are ready to normalize hyflex instruction?

      I feel that the challenges of hybrid / hyflex teaching are significant. I'm not sure the benefits are worth it. I'd rather have two sections--one in-person and one online.

    2. We later agreed that because of the quality of the camera and microphones, it was almost like actually being present in the room, or being present as a hologram.

      In my experience, this is the only way "hybrid" teaching works well. You need quality cameras and microphones so the distant student can hear and see well.

    1. there might be a miscellaneous division, which wouldserve as a "tickler" and which might even be equipped with a set ofcalendar guides so that the "follow-up" system may be used.

      An example of a ticker file in the vein of getting things done (GTD) documented using index cards and a card file from 1917. Sounds very familiar to the Pile of Index Cards (PoIC) from the early 2000s.

    2. Sutherland, Lois Gilbert. “The English Teacher’s Card File.” The English Journal 6, no. 2 (1917): 111–12. https://doi.org/10.2307/801508.


      Lois Gilbert Sutherland suggests using a card index system for multiple uses in the classroom including notes, administration, and general productivity.

      There are so many parallels from this to how people are using platforms like Obsidian, Roam Research, and Notion in 2022.

    1. Out of our cleverness has emerged something almost more importantthan the cleverness itself. Out of it has come learning about how to share ideasand pass down skills and knowledge. Out of it has come education.

      Gary Thomas posits that it's our cleverness which birthed education. Isn't it more likely our extreme ability to mimic others which is more likely from a cognitive and evolutionary perspective?

      Were early peoples really "teaching" each other how to make primitive hand axes? Or did we first start out by closely mimicking our neighbors?

    1. Max Raisin (1881–1957),reflected that lessons often devolved into ‘reading several events with dates out of alittle notebook’ (Raisin, 1952: 147; Hertzman, 1985: 83-8).

      Max Raisin indicated that Gotthard Deutsch read several events with dates out of a little notebook during lectures. Was this really a notebook or possibly a small stack/deck of index cards? The could certainly be easily mistaken....

      Check these references

    1. Does Deutsch’s index constitute a great unwritten work of history, as some have claimed, or are the cards ultimately useless ‘chips from his workshop’?

      From his bibliography, it appears that Deutsch was a prolific writer and teacher, so how will Lustig (or others he mentions) make the case that his card index was useless "chips from his workshop"? Certainly he used them in writing his books, articles, and newspaper articles? He also was listed as a significant contributor to an encyclopedia as well.

      It'd be interesting to look at the record to see if he taught with them the way Roland Barthes was known to have done.

    1. Leopold von Ranke (German: [fɔn ˈʁaŋkə]; 21 December 1795 – 23 May 1886) was a German historian and a founder of modern source-based history.[3][4] According to Caroline Hoefferle, "Ranke was probably the most important historian to shape [the] historical profession as it emerged in Europe and the United States in the late 19th century".[5] He was able to implement the seminar teaching method in his classroom and focused on archival research and the analysis of historical documents. Building on the methods of the Göttingen School of History,[6] he was the first to establish a historical seminar. Ranke set the standards for much of later historical writing, introducing such ideas as reliance on primary sources (empiricism), an emphasis on narrative history and especially international politics (Außenpolitik). Ranke also had a great influence on Western historiography. He was ennobled in 1865, with the addition of a "von" to his name.
    1. Wieman, Carl. “How to Become a Successful Physicist.” Physics Today 75, no. 9 (September 2022): 46–52. https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.5082

      The details here are also good in teaching almost all areas of knowledge, particularly when problem solving is involved.

      How might one teach the practice of combinatorial creativity?

    2. My research group interviewed some 50 skilled scientists and engineers (“experts”), including physicists, on how they solved authentic problems in their discipline. We analyzed the interviews in terms of the decisions made during the solving process. Decisions were defined as instances when an expert selected between competing alternatives before taking some action. To my surprise, we found that the same set of 29 decisions occurred over and over (see the box on page 50). Nearly all of them showed up in every interview, and they essentially defined the problem-solving process.3

      Though interviews with scientists and engineers, researchers have identified a list of 29 commonly occurring decisions made during problem solving processes.

    1. Dwyer, Edward J. “File Card Efficiency.” Journal of Reading 26, no. 2 (1982): 171–171.

      Ease of use in writing and grading with short assignments by using 4 x 6" index cards in classrooms.

      This sounds like some of the articles from 1912 and 1917 about efficiency of card indexes for teaching.

      I'm reminded of some programmed learning texts that were card-based (or really strip-based since they were published in book form) in the 1960s and 1970s. Thse books had small strips with lessons or questions on the front with the answers on the reverse. One would read in strips through the book from front to back and then start the book all over again on page one on the second row of strips and so on.

    1. Rotzel, Grace. “Card File.” The English Journal 6, no. 10 (December 1917): 691–691. https://doi.org/10.2307/801092.

      Follow up note to prior article indicating some sorter term benefits of filing student work and taking notes on it for helping to create improvement over time.

    2. In the February, 1917, number of the English Journal there warticle on "The English Teacher's
    1. Breitenbach, H. P. “The Card Index for Teachers.” The School Review 20, no. 4 (1912): 271–72.


      Apparently in 1912, the card index was little known to teachers... this isn't the sort of use case I was expecting here...

      The general gist of this short note is an encouraging one to suggest that instead of traditional grade books, which are still used heavily in 2022, teachers should use rolodex like cards for keeping attendance and notes on a student's progress.

      Presumably this never caught on. While some elementary teachers still use older paper gradebooks, many others have transferred to digital LMS platforms.

  17. Sep 2022
  18. Aug 2022
    1. And if you still need a why–I’ll let this quote from Seneca answer it (which I got from my own reading and notes): “We should hunt out the helpful pieces of teaching and the spirited and noble-minded sayings which are capable of immediate practical application–not far far-fetched or archaic expressions or extravagant metaphors and figures of speech–and learn them so well that words become works.”
  19. Jul 2022
    1. 1. Focus on items that occur with high frequency in the language as awhole (see Table 3.1 for examples). Such items will occur often inmany different texts.2. Focus on strategies that can be used with most texts (see Table 3.1for examples).

      .c1

    2. Here are the rules associated with the free and checked vowels. Theserules apply only to stressed syllables.

      .c1

    1. People who write extensively about note-writing rarely have a serious context of use https://notes.andymatuschak.org/zUMFE66dxeweppDvgbNAb5hukXzXQu8ErVNv

      This idea can be extrapolated to a much larger set of practitioners. It could be termed "the curse of the influencer".

      link to: - aphorism: "Those who can't do, teach", from the original line ‘Those who can, do; those who can’t, teach’ in George Bernard Shaw’s 1905 stage play Man and Superman.

    1. In design terms, this begins with the learning experience (LX) of students — but often extends toward the teaching experience (TX), and even the user experience of technologists, instructional designers and administrators. Collectively, I call these the "pedagogical experience" (PX) of an e-learning tool.

      Designing pedagogical experience (PX) encompasses both the learning experience (LX) of the students as well as the teaching experience (TX) of the instructor.

      Educational technology should take both parts of the overall experience into account. Too many focus on one side or the other: the ease of use for the teacher at the expense of the student or the ease of use for the student at the expense of the teacher. Balancing the two can be difficult, but designers should be watching both.

    1. One of the risks I heard mentioned is that of becoming/ being perceived as an ”arm of the university bureaucracy”, as CTLs become more involved in decision-making on educational issues.

      Interesting problem. Why is the CTL not seen as an "arm of shared governance" in these cases? Or at least a venue of it?

    2. Dilemma: should/ can the CTL be neutral territory (and can it be?)

      Fascinating to see what "neutral" means here. There's the "non-evaluative"/"non-supervisory" sense, where "neutrality" is essentially with respect to office politics, and the "not advancing an argument" sense, which in the strictest sense seems almost impossible to reconcile with any kind of developmental work.

  20. Jun 2022
    1. https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/learning-innovation/why-%E2%80%98how-humans-learn%E2%80%99-book-i%E2%80%99ve-been-waiting

      How Humans Learn: The Science and Stories Behind Effective College Teaching by Joshua R. Eyler #books/wanttoread<br /> Published in March 2018

      Mentioned at the [[Hypothesis Social Learning Summit - Spotlight on Social Reading & Social Annotation]] in the chat in the [[Social Annotation Showcase]]

    2. For college professors, I think the critical contribution of How Humans Learn is that good teaching is constructed, not ordained.

      "...good teaching is constructed, not ordained."

    1. Research is messy and full of failed attempts. Trying to protect students from that reality does them a disservice.

      Yup. This is basically a version of "don't coddle your students".

  21. May 2022
    1. What's the Best Way to Teach Science?

      0:31 What's the best way to teach science in my opinion? It's to do science. And to summarize my motto it's this: Don't Kill the Wonder! (and don't hide the practices)

      0:42 The wonder is a look that you see on a person's face when they're REALLY interested in a problem but they don't know the answer.

      1:13 And so the WORST way to teach science is to start by explaining! You want them to have that curiosity and then follow that curiosity.

      3:16 When you're teaching science it's not the content ... what is the most important thing. It's the actual practices of doing science.

      3:41 ...We live in an ironic time. At a time where people are so excited about science and new discoveries but students are not excited about their classroom. And I think one of the reasons why, is that what we do, is we tend to just explain all the time. When you explain all the time what you lose is the Wonder. —

      https://youtu.be/TzoIz2W-gLQ

  22. Apr 2022
    1. Trisha Greenhalgh #IStandWithUkraine 🇺🇦 [@trishgreenhalgh]. (2021, September 26). Big Thread coming on ‘returning to on-site teaching’. Intended mainly for universities (because I work in one), but may also be useful for schools. Mute thread if not interested. I’ll base it around real questions I’ve been asked. 1/ [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/trishgreenhalgh/status/1442162256779821060

    1. Much of Barthes’ intellectual and pedagogical work was producedusing his cards, not just his published texts. For example, Barthes’Collège de France seminar on the topic of the Neutral, thepenultimate course he would take prior to his death, consisted offour bundles of about 800 cards on which was recorded everythingfrom ‘bibliographic indications, some summaries, notes, andprojects on abandoned figures’ (Clerc, 2005: xxi-xxii).

      In addition to using his card index for producing his published works, Barthes also used his note taking system for teaching as well. His final course on the topic of the Neutral, which he taught as a seminar at Collège de France, was contained in four bundles consisting of 800 cards which contained everything from notes, summaries, figures, and bibliographic entries.


      Given this and the easy portability of index cards, should we instead of recommending notebooks, laptops, or systems like Cornell notes, recommend students take notes directly on their note cards and revise them from there? The physicality of the medium may also have other benefits in terms of touch, smell, use of colors on them, etc. for memory and easy regular use. They could also be used physically for spaced repetition relatively quickly.

      Teachers using their index cards of notes physically in class or in discussions has the benefit of modeling the sort of note taking behaviors we might ask of our students. Imagine a classroom that has access to a teacher's public notes (electronic perhaps) which could be searched and cross linked by the students in real-time. This would also allow students to go beyond the immediate topic at hand, but see how that topic may dovetail with the teachers' other research work and interests. This also gives greater meaning to introductory coursework to allow students to see how it underpins other related and advanced intellectual endeavors and invites the student into those spaces as well. This sort of practice could bring to bear the full weight of the literacy space which we center in Western culture, for compare this with the primarily oral interactions that most teachers have with students. It's only in a small subset of suggested or required readings that students can use for leveraging the knowledge of their teachers while all the remainder of the interactions focus on conversation with the instructor and questions that they might put to them. With access to a teacher's card index, they would have so much more as they might also query that separately without making demands of time and attention to their professors. Even if answers aren't immediately forthcoming from the file, then there might at least be bibliographic entries that could be useful.

      I recently had the experience of asking a colleague for some basic references about the history and culture of the ancient Near East. Knowing that he had some significant expertise in the space, it would have been easier to query his proverbial card index for the lived experience and references than to bother him with the burden of doing work to pull them up.

      What sorts of digital systems could help to center these practices? Hypothes.is quickly comes to mind, though many teachers and even students will prefer to keep their notes private and not public where they're searchable.

      Another potential pathway here are systems like FedWiki or anagora.org which provide shared and interlinked note spaces. Have any educators attempted to use these for coursework? The closest I've seen recently are public groups using shared Roam Research or Obsidian-based collections for book clubs.

  23. Mar 2022
    1. Research suggeststhat making these motions will improve our own performance: people who

      gesture as they teach on video, it’s been found, speak more fluently and articulately, make fewer mistakes, and present information in a more logical and intelligible fashion.

      Teachers who gesture as they teach have been found to make fewer mistakes, speak more fluently/articulately, and present their lessons in a more intelligible and logical manner.

  24. Feb 2022
    1. Read for Understanding

      Ahrens goes through a variety of research on teaching and learning as they relate to active reading, escaping cognitive biases, creating understanding, progressive summarization, elaboration, revision, etc. as a means of showing and summarizing how these all dovetail nicely into a fruitful long term practice of using a slip box as a note taking method. This makes the zettelkasten not only a great conversation partner but an active teaching and learning partner as well. (Though he doesn't mention the first part in this chapter or make this last part explicit.)

    2. While it is obvious that familiarity is not understanding, we have nochance of knowing whether we understand something or just believewe understand something until we test ourselves in some form.

      The Cornell notes practice of writing questions in the empty left column as a means of testing knowledge can be an effective tool after taking notes to ensure that one has actually learned and understood the broad concepts. They can also be used for spaced repetition purposes as well.

      Valuable though they may be as teaching and learning tools, they don't figure directly into the idea of permanent notes from a zettelkasten perspective.

    3. Hubert and Stuart Dreyfus, researchers on expertise, have asimple explanation: Teachers tend to mistake the ability to follow(their) rules with the ability to make the right choices in realsituations.

      Expertise isn't just the ability to know the rules and practice them properly, but to know when to break or bend them as present circumstances might require.

    4. the accidental encounters make up the majority of what welearn.

      Serendipity is a valuable teacher.

  25. Jan 2022
    1. It’s a lot more work to give people an interesting puzzle to solve, support them with high expectations all the way through them doing something genuinely compelling and interesting with the synthesis (and they know when you’re just BSing them), and hold them to high standards while also modeling the appropriate behaviors yourself. It’s almost impossible with class sizes upwards of 40 and class periods of 40 minutes and most of the system isn’t actually optimized for achieving that anyway
    2. https://eleanorkonik.com/the-difficulties-of-teaching-notetaking/

      A fascinating take on why we don't teach study skills and note taking the way they had traditionally been done in the past. What we're teaching and teaching toward has changed dramatically.

    1. Depuis longtemps, je suis d’avis que la rigueur d’un cours ne se mesure pas à la quantité de connaissances dont l’enseignant fait étalage, mais aux apprentissages que les étudiants font.

      Which can lead to an assessment of pedagogical efficacy. It's funny, to me, that those who complain about "grade inflation" (typically admins) rarely entertain the notion that grades could be higher than usual if the course went well. The situation is quite different in "L&D" (Learning and Development, typically for training and professional development in an organizational context). "Oh, great! We were able to get everyone to reach the standard for this competency! Must mean that we've done something right in our Instructional Design!"

    1. My plan is to turn Write of Passage into an independent publishing company, which will become the main growth channel for Write of Passage.

      This is a tremendous opportunity for people to leave academia. Imagine being a technical writer, business writer, poet, or creative writer. This could be a good networking opportunity.

  26. Dec 2021
    1. How do I allow students to voice contentious, ugly, or even ignorant views, so that they can learn without fear of recrimination?

      Too broad of a spectrum here. And why should students not fear recrimination? This is coddling, pure and simple.

    2. first-day surveys, name tents, and very brief in-class writing about students’ values or daily lives help students experience a sense of belonging.

      Now imagine it from the students' POV, students who are taken 4 or more courses, and having to do the same engagement exercises over and over again in all their classes.

      I think it would drive them in the opposite direction from that intended by the instructor.

    1. Lack of perceived benefit or need.

      Had a patron get mad with me because I told them I discover new music through YouTube and other social media. He was one that asked me about it, in the first the place.

    2. Negative feelings about social media.

      Not true when people such as Lynn “Lynja” Davis from Cooking with Lynja, is one the most popular cooks on TikTok when is 77 and retired. She literally has more followers than everyone I know personally combined.

      Side note Dan Povenmire is the creator of Phineas and Ferb maybe only 58, but he is literally one the best thing on TikTok other than Lynja of course

    3. Had a patron get mad with me because I told them I discover new music through YouTube and other social media. He was one that asked me about it, in the first the place.

    1. In this study, we drew on sociocultural notions of agency – where individual actions are entwined with community goals. A community is comprised of people with shared and individual goals, in their environments, in the midst of a historical context (Wenger 1998Wenger, E. 1998. Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning, and Identity. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. [Crossref], [Google Scholar]). Due to this web of relationships with people, environment, and history, people do not act autonomously, but according to possibilities within the community. Such possibilities for agency are negotiated over time; actions that strengthen ties to the community constitute investments in the self that in turn, have outcomes for the community as well (Peirce 1995Peirce, B. N. 1995. “Social Identity, Investment, and Language Learning.” TESOL Quarterly 29: 9–31. doi:10.2307/3587803. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]). The financial metaphor in using the word investment is critical – it connotes spent effort that yields dividends. These dividends emerge immediately and over time.

      This helps me consider communities of practice, and unpacking the relational aspects - agency within a context, not autonomous, informed by the context and others. Is there a tension with "groupthink", how to value the diversity in a group, and build stronger not weaker, not defaulting or regressing to a mean?. How do we build a group to be more than the sum of the parts. how does the community work to enhance practice.

  27. Nov 2021
    1. TALIS(Teaching and Learning International Survey)

      TALIS

      (Teaching and Learning International Survey)

    2. Remote and distance teaching will become increasingly
    3. upper secondaryschool teachers' experiences of Emergency Distance Teaching

      The purpose of this study was to explore the Swedish upper secondary school teachers' experiences of Emergency Distance Teaching during the first year of the Covid-19 pandemic. Three research questions were considered sufficient to answer this aim.

    4. organization and experiences of teaching and learningduring this time are described based on representative surveys conducted during andafter the spring 2020 distance teaching period.

      organization and experiences of teaching and learning during this time are described based on representative surveys conducted during and after the spring 2020 distance teaching period.

  28. Sep 2021
  29. Aug 2021
  30. Jul 2021
    1. This distinction is familiar in terms of the differences be­tween being able to remember something and being able to explain it.

      This quote is similar and generally related to the Feynman Technique. (see: https://fs.blog/2021/02/feynman-learning-technique/) It's based apparently on quotes attributed to Feynman which include:

      • "I couldn't reduce it to the freshman level. That means we really don't understand it."
      • "If you can't explain it to a six year old, you don't really understand it."
    1. This is one of the more-satisfying ruby expressions I've seen in a long time. I can't say that it also has prosaic transparency, but I think seeing it teaches important things.