184 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2022
    1. Government and its instrumentalities have used RA 10175 in their attempt to silence not only critical reporting but even truthful coverage of government affairs. Adding the prerogative of prosecuting groups and individuals for supposedly generating and spreading false information to the vast powers of government will make the already difficult and even dangerous journalistic enterprise more uncertain, and will have a devastating impact on the people’s right to know what is going on in the government to whose officials they have delegated their sovereign powers. Any law penalizing the making and spreading of false information will, for the above reasons, more likely be part of the misinformation and disinformation problem rather than part of the solution.

      Senator Jinggoy Estrada has filed Senate Bill No. 1296 that would amend the Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012 (RA 10175) to include "fake news" among the offenses the Act penalizes. The senator defines “fake news” as “misinformation and disinformation of stories (sic) which is (sic) presented as a (sic) fact, the veracity of which cannot be confirmed, with the purpose of distorting the truth and misleading its (sic) audience.” Not only do we have a problem with misinformation, we also have a problem what "fake news" really means in the first place. According to Teodoro, L. (2022), any legislation that criminalizes the creation and dissemination of incorrect information is more likely to contribute to the problem of misinformation and disinformation than to help solve it. While the roots of a certain piece of false information can be traced back to the source and be verified, the roots of the whole "fake news" problem is what the people really need to address in the first place.

    1. Trolls, in this context, are humans who hold accounts on social media platforms, more or less for one purpose: To generate comments that argue with people, insult and name-call other users and public figures, try to undermine the credibility of ideas they don’t like, and to intimidate individuals who post those ideas. And they support and advocate for fake news stories that they’re ideologically aligned with. They’re often pretty nasty in their comments. And that gets other, normal users, to be nasty, too.

      Not only programmed accounts are created but also troll accounts that propagate disinformation and spread fake news with the intent to cause havoc on every people. In short, once they start with a malicious comment some people will engage with the said comment which leads to more rage comments and disagreements towards each other. That is what they do, they trigger people to engage in their comments so that they can be spread more and produce more fake news. These troll accounts usually are prominent during elections, like in the Philippines some speculates that some of the candidates have made troll farms just to spread fake news all over social media in which some people engage on.

    2. So, bots are computer algorithms (set of logic steps to complete a specific task) that work in online social network sites to execute tasks autonomously and repetitively. They simulate the behavior of human beings in a social network, interacting with other users, and sharing information and messages [1]–[3]. Because of the algorithms behind bots’ logic, bots can learn from reaction patterns how to respond to certain situations. That is, they possess artificial intelligence (AI). 

      In all honesty, since I don't usually dwell on technology, coding, and stuff. I thought when you say "Bot" it is controlled by another user like a legit person, never knew that it was programmed and created to learn the usual patterns of posting of some people may be it on Twitter, Facebook, and other social media platforms. I think it is important to properly understand how "Bots" work to avoid misinformation and disinformation most importantly during this time of prominent social media use.

  2. Aug 2022
    1. MANILA, Philippines — Seven out of 10 adult Filipinos believe the problem of fake news and its spread on the internet is serious, according to the latest survey by the Social Weather Stations (SWS). The survey, done from Dec. 12 to Dec. 16 through in-person interviews of 1,440 adults, found 69 percent of Filipinos saying the problem of fake news in the media is serious, up from 60 percent in December 2017.

      The number of Filipinos that are aware of the dangers and severity of fake news is rising. The severe widespread of fake news can be typically seen on social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. It is very disappointing that fake news and disinformation is so widespread within society. However there is a glimmer of hope as more and more people recognize the problem at hand.

  3. Jul 2022
    1. Dogen can be very difficult to read or understand. That’s why we often need a commentary or teacher to introduce his way of writing and the underlying teaching. I often say he’s a thirteenth century cubist. Just like Picasso or in the writing world, Gertrude Stein, he tries to show all sides of the story in one paragraph or even one sentence. That is why he repeats himself and contradicts himself all in the same paragraph. If you are looking for the “right” understanding, you become confused and lost in his prism of various interpretations or views. Dogen’s “right” understanding is that there is none.   No one point of view is “right”. According to conditions, any view can be the right view in the right circumstance. Dogen really wants to take away our solid idea of a fixed ground of reality. It is not form or emptiness. It is not both or neither. There is no one right, fixed view. That is our “clinging”.

      Dogen contradicts himself because he tries to show "all sides of the story". His teaching is a "pointing out" instruction that ANY viewpoint is simply that, perspectival knowing.

      An important question then, is this, if Dogen (and Nagarjuna) are claiming that there is no objective reality in our constructed world of concepts and language, is science being denied? Is fake news ok? Is this a position that basically accepts post modernism? No, I would say no to all of these. It's pointing out the LIMITATIONS of concepts and language. They are incomplete and always leave with a sense of wanting more. And since Post Modernism is also one point of view, it is also thrown out by Dogen and Nagarjuna. Remember, ALL points of views are points of view. Fake news is also a point of view so those who practice it can also not justify it.

      What Dogen and Nagarjuna are saying is that as soon as one enters the world of concepts and language, any concept and anything side is inherently one sided. It is inherently perspectival and situated in an inherently incomplete conceptual space.

      As Tibetan doctor/monk Barry Kerzin points out in this conversation with physicist Carlo Rovelli, there is a critical difference between "existence" and "intrinsic existence". The first is not being denied by Nagarjuna, but the second, intrinsic existence, the existence of concepts and the words that represent them, is. If these two are confused, it can lead straight to nihilism.

      https://hyp.is/go?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdocdrop.org%2Fvideo%2FsPSMTNjwHZw%2F&group=world

      This also aligns with John Vervaeke's perspectival and propositional knowing in his 4 P ways of knowing about reality: Propositional, Perspectival, Participatory and Procedural. A good explanation of Vervaeke's 4Ps is here: https://hyp.is/go?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdocdrop.org%2Fvideo%2FGyx5tyFttfA%2F&group=world

  4. Jun 2022
    1. algorithmic radicalization is presumably a simpler problem to solve than the fact that there are people who deliberately seek out vile content. “These are the three stories—echo chambers, foreign influence campaigns, and radicalizing recommendation algorithms—but, when you look at the literature, they’ve all been overstated.”

      algorithmic radicalization

    1. the man's eight videos posted to TikTok last Thursday and Friday generated much attention. Combined, the posts garnered more than 2 million views and were recirculated on YouTube and Instagram by large-scale content creators reaching exponentially more people

      When parody is consumed as news, and the fake news spreads.

  5. Apr 2022
    1. Die Beantwortung der Frage, wie man die[93] Demokratie verteidigen, stützen oder gar ausbauen kann, geht weit über das Themadieses Buches hinaus

      Betrifft den Inhalt des Buches aber wie richtigerweise kurz angerissen ganz klar - genauso wie Tiedemann und Nida-Rümelin es ausweisen, ohne es ganz auszuhandeln

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  6. Mar 2022
    1. “So far, most trials that have compared COVID-19 mortality between jurisdictions with stringent lockdowns against those with more liberal approaches have not demonstrated any mortality reduction from the more stringent policies,” he said.

      That's bollocks. Even when this article was published it was bollocks. There was evidence from all around the world that lockdowns work.

  7. Feb 2022
    1. “If we are not serious about facts and what’s true and what’s not, if we can’t discriminate between serious arguments and propaganda, then we have problems.”

      I think something that is not being acknowledged very often when it comes to the conversation of discussing misinformation and disinformation is that there is always an unspoken social pressure or influence to always seem "likeable" "in-the-know" or "always right." Especially considering where social media is a very big resource in today's social climate, many people may not be honest about it, however a lot of us are fearful that if we say the wrong thing or think the wrong things, people may not befriend us, embrace us, or like you. So, there is a certain social engineering that is occurring where people are subscribing to certain ideas simply because that seems to be the group consensus and that causes pressure. We all must be accountable for debunking lies.

  8. Jan 2022
  9. Dec 2021
    1. Teachers typically focus on the first point, with an emphasis on legacy local news outlets (such as daily or weekly newspapers) and national news sources (such as weekly or monthly magazines and network news organizations). While students do need to learn how to evaluate news from these sources, the reality is that very few young people — even as they grow older — will use them the way their teachers and parents do.

      Moving away from printed newspapers into social media

    2. Wardle discourages use of the phrase, largely because it is unhelpful: “The term ‘fake’ doesn’t begin to describe the complexity of the different types of misinformation (the inadvertent sharing of false information) and disinformation (the deliberate creation and sharing of information known to be false).

      Against using the term "fake news"

    3. Journalism’s purpose, as the American Press Institute puts it, is “to provide citizens with the information they need to make the best possible decisions about their lives, their communities, their societies, and their governments.”

      What is journalism?

    4. As news consumption has moved online, news organizations long recognized for their credibility and adherence to traditional standards of quality journal-ism have seen their profits disappear and their staffs decimated. As a result, many communities have lost common sources of information — and a common understanding of facts.Add social platforms with their algorithms and bots, and the public is now caught in a powerful and danger-ous whirlwind of self- and auto-selected news, rumors, gossip, state-sponsored propaganda and falsehoods

      Origins of Fake News

    1. Prof. Shane Crotty. (2021, November 2). Wow. COVID vaccine misinformation continues to be soooo horrible. This is incredible widespread and ABSOLUTELY made up. (Just like the insanity of implantable chips they continue to claim over and over) These fabrications are so damaging to the health of Americans. [Tweet]. @profshanecrotty. https://twitter.com/profshanecrotty/status/1455540502955241489

  10. Nov 2021
  11. Oct 2021
    1. We propose a tri-relationship embedding framework TriFN, which models publisher-news relations and user-news interactions simultaneously for fake news classification. We conduct experiments on two real-world datasets, which demonstrate that the proposed approach significantly outperforms other baseline methods for fake news detection.

      It was said in the conclusion that the TriFN can have a good fake news detection performance in the early stage of information dissemination because of the interactions in social media. User credibility was also mentioned since low credibility users tend to spread fake news.

      This means that users play a big part in detecting and reducing fake news in social media. Let's be responsible to only share credible news articles and report the misleading ones.

    1. The rationale is that stories that mix true and false facts may represent attempts to mislead readers. Thus, we focus our analysis on understanding how features can be used to discriminate true and fake news.

      I think the mix of true and false information is the most difficult to detect since the false information is intentionally in-between facts and articles on social media feed on surface reading to cause misleading. Even basic google searching can be tricked this way because the algorithm will most likely show results related the keywords on the facts, and not proving that an information is false.

    2. FAKE NEWS DETECTION IN PRACTICE

      The article showed the scientific processes that can be used in analyzing information and how they applied it in fact-checking. Technology makes fact-checking easier and faster but humans are still the most accurate. That is why studying information science is important because of its relevance to the society.

  12. Sep 2021
    1. SuzeeB🙂. (2021, September 14). Dear vaccinated, We did not take your freedom. The government did. We are not holding your freedoms to ransom. The government is. If we are a danger to you, then your vaccine doesn’t work. If it does, then you should already be free. The government has lied to you. [Tweet]. @NatalieSuB. https://twitter.com/NatalieSuB/status/1437835320628809733

  13. Aug 2021
  14. Jul 2021
    1. Blogging about your work hits both of those marks. It also means that you have to translate your work from academese to language that non-academics will understand (i.e. jargon) and also foreground the relevance of your work. You have to tell people why your work is important and what it adds to the world.

      This is such an important point. Donald Trump did such an excellent job speaking at a level a lay person could understand when downplaying the seriousness of the Covid-19 virus thus undermining the scientific and medical community voices, that many Americans are refusing to vaccinate. This puts the world at risk for future variants that might be much worse than the ones we have now. More academics simplifying knowledge will help stem the tide of fake news, political propaganda and truly harmful misinformation.

  15. Jun 2021
  16. May 2021
    1. Prof. Gavin Yamey MD MPH. (2021, April 20). I was very pleased to see Levitt resign yesterday from the science advisory board of the anti-vaxx group PANDA. Previously Sikora had resigned. This press release mentions other resignations. Anyone know if the 3 GBD authors finally resigned? Here’s PANDA’s views on vaccines: Https://t.co/wVZX7XujZ3 [Tweet]. @GYamey. https://twitter.com/GYamey/status/1384476491317227525

  17. Apr 2021
  18. Mar 2021
    1. Nick Barrowman. (2021, March 26). Throughout the pandemic, a widespread inability to reason counterfactually has been on display. For example, some people apparently think lockdowns don’t work. They seem unable to imagine the situation had there not been a lockdown. Lockdowns are costly, but they work! [Tweet]. @nbarrowman. https://twitter.com/nbarrowman/status/1375240312264740870

  19. Feb 2021
  20. Jan 2021
  21. Dec 2020
  22. Nov 2020
  23. Oct 2020
    1. and narratives in fiction, popular nonfiction, and marketing material. These texts shape the public’s knowledge about and potential engagement with transoce-anic networks.

      on peut se demander si la littérature (+cinéma etc.) ne se dédouane pas de sa responsabilité vis-à-vis de ses effets sur l’imaginaire collectif – une question qui mérite assurément d’être réinvestie à l’ère des fake news – puisqu’elle façonne en partie la représentation que le public se fait sur un sujet.

      on reprochera par exemple aux films historiques (mettant en scène un musicien dont les gestes ne correspondent pas à ce qui est joué, une athlète de haut niveau qui reproduit pauvrement la technique de course, un film d’époque avec des écriteaux dans une police de caractères inventée en 2000…) de véhiculer des absurdités collatérales à leur réalisation mal informée.

    1. Long-term effectiveness of inoculation against misinformation: Three longitudinal experiments. - PsycNET. (n.d.). Retrieved October 10, 2020, from /doiLanding?doi=10.1037%2Fxap0000315