14 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. the Antinet can serve both states. It can assist someone who’s in thegrowth state (without a clear end goal), and it can also assist someone who’sin the contribution state (with a clearly defined book or project).

      This could be clearer and "growth state" and "contribution state" feel like jargon which muddles:

      two of the broad benefits/affordances of having a zettelkasten: - learning and scaffolding knowledge (writing for understanding) - collecting and arranging material for general output

      see also: https://boffosocko.com/2022/04/01/the-zettelkasten-method-of-note-taking-mirrors-most-of-the-levels-of-blooms-taxonomy/

  2. Jul 2022
    1. Finally, new notes should be connected with anexisting note when you add them to your system. I’lldescribe this in greater detail shortly; the point for now isthat linking a new thought to an existing train of thoughtseems to be a key to your note-making system workingfor you. Where does this new idea fit into your thoughtson an issue? Your questions about a topic? Your ideasabout a puzzle you’re working on understanding?Disciplining yourself to make this connection can be abit tough and time-consuming at first. It is worth theinvestment. Without understanding how these ideas thatinterest us fit together, all we have is a pile of unrelatedtrivia.

      Writing and refining one's note about an idea can be key to helping one's basic understanding of that idea, but this understanding is dramatically increased by linking it into the rest of one's framework of understanding of that idea. A useful side benefit of creating this basic understanding and extending it is that one can also reuse one's (better understood) ideas to create new papers for expanding other's reading and subsequent understanding.

  3. May 2022
    1. Active reading to the extreme!

      What a clever innovation building on the ideas of the art of memory and Raymond Llull's combinatoric arts!

      Does this hit all of the areas of Bloom's Taxonomy? I suspect that it does.

      How could it be tied more directly into an active reading, annotating, and note taking practice?

  4. Apr 2022
    1. In the example below you will save time if you use a personal reference rather than trying to paint a picture that would aptly illustrate the question

      More closely associating new ideas to one's own personal life helps to create and expand the context of the learning to what one already knows.

      Within the context of Bloom's Taxonomy, doing this shows that one understands and is already applying and even doing a bit of creating, at least internally.


      Should 'understanding' come before 'remembering' in Bloom's taxonomy? That seems more logical to me.


      Bloom's Taxonomy mirrors the zettelkasten method

      (Recall Bloom's Taxonomy: remember, understand, apply, analyze, evaluate, create)

      One needs to be able to generally understand an idea(s) to be able to write it down clearly in one's own words. Regular work within a zettelkasten helps to reinforce memory of ideas for understanding and retention. Applying the knowledge to other situations happens almost naturally with the combinatorial creativity that occurs within a zettelkasten. Analysis is heavily encouraged as one takes new information and links it to prior knowledge and ideas; this is also concurrent with the application of knowledge. Being able to compare and contrast two ideas on separate cards is also part of the analysis portions of Bloom's taxonomy which also leads into the evaluation phase. Finally, one of the most important reasons for keeping a zettelkasten is to use it to generate or create new ideas and thoughts and then write them down in articles, books, or other media in a clear and justified manner.

  5. Jan 2022
    1. Its design allows you to jump between moving fast and slow through your notes and has the benefits of active recall built-in, making your memories stickier.

      This method also presupposes that one is taking notes solely for memorizing facts and helping to support basic understanding.

      What about for analysis, comparison, synthesis, generation of entirely new ideas?

  6. Jul 2021
    1. To be informed is to know simply that something is the case. To be enlightened is to know, in addition, what it is all about: why it is the case, what its connections are with other facts, in what respects it is the same, in what respects it is different, and so forth.

      The distinctions between being informed and enlightened.

      Learning might be defined as the pathway from being informed as a preliminary base on the way to full enlightenment. Pedagogy is the teacher's plan for how to take this path.

      How would these definitions and distinctions fit into Bloom's taxonomy?

      Note that properly annotating and taking notes into a commonplace book can be a serious (necessary?) step one might take on the way towards enlightenment.

  7. May 2021
    1. Bloom’s taxonomy is a framework that suggests learners move from lower order thinking such as remembering and understanding, through to higher order thinking skills that include synthesising, evaluating and creating [26].

      This looks somewhat intriguing:

      Krathwohl DR. A Revision of Bloom’s Taxonomy: An Overview. Theory Into Practice. 2002;41(4):212–8. _2. https://doi.org/10.1207/s15430421tip4104 | Google Scholar

  8. Mar 2021
    1. A summary/paraphrase of specific parts of the article you found interesting Definitions of terms used in the article (with links)References to people/places/things mentioned in the article (with links or images/videos)Opinions (respectfully, with evidence)Questions Links to related materials or further evidence on the same subject 

      This is a great list of some common types of annotations for students just starting out, but it misses one key annotation that I think is the goal of all annotations:

      New ideas from the reader that have been sparked by the writing.

      Incidentally, this is also one of the more difficult types to create and it's also harder to model to students.

      In some sense, many of these annotation types fall relatively neatly into Bloom's taxonomy with my addendum falling under the top level of the pyramid usually labeled "create".

  9. Nov 2019
    1. Integrating Technology with Bloom’s Taxonomy

      This article was published by a team member of the ASU Online Instructional Design and New Media (IDNM) team at Arizona State University. This team shares instructional design methods and resources on the TeachOnline site for online learning. "Integrating Technology with Bloom's Taxonomy" describes practices for implementing 6 principles of Bloom's Digital Taxonomy in online learning. These principles include Creating, Evaluating, Analyzing, Applying, Understanding, and Remembering. The purpose of implementing this model is to create more meaningful and effective experiences for online learners. The author guides instructors in the selection of digital tools that drive higher-order thinking, active engagmenent, and relevancy. Rating 9/10

  10. Oct 2019
    1. Disposable Assignment

      Disposable assignments can often be mistaken for low stakes assessments and lower levels of Bloom's taxonomy. The key here may be how long the assignment takes the student to complete and does it have value in highlighting key points of a particular learning module. Low stakes assessments can be powerful so defining what disposable means could be tricky work but important.

  11. Jul 2019
    1. such as analyzing and evaluating concepts, processes, procedures, and principles, rather than just remembering facts (rote learning)

      different from UbD in this way

  12. Mar 2019
    1. This is Bloom's taxonomy of cognitive objectives. I selected this page because it explains both the old and new versions of the taxonomy. When writing instructional objectives for adult learning and training, one should identify the level of learning in Blooms that is needed. This is not the most attractive presentation but it is one of the more thorough ones. rating 4/5

    1. This is one of many pages that lists verbs at various levels of Bloom's old taxonomy (verb lists for the new version are easy to find as well). This one has green bars across the page so may not be best for those who are trying to preserve ink though it is easy and attractive to use if referring to it on the screen. Rating 4/5

  13. Jan 2019
    1. To be considered knowledgeable, all you need to do is remember what you learn, understand what you learn, and then apply what you learn.

      I agree with Sean’s critique here insofar as he’s - to my reading - warning against a vision of learning that’s more concerned with mass complacency than individual critical thinking. Yet I find Bloom’s Taxonomy to be a helpful launch point. For instance, I think it’s important for teachers to help students remember what they’ve previously learned in order to build on that knowledge. I think building knowledge does require recall; otherwise, new information remains in isolation. The problem arises when teachers and students alike do not engage in the more complex acts of analyzing and evaluating. For me, when I’m (co)designing a lesson, I return to Bloom not as a tablet delivered from on high, but as a taxonomy of possibility, a collection of verbs that stimulates my own thinking about the types of learning that might happen in a certain class with a specific set of students.