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  1. Last 7 days
    1. We repeat this procedure 10,000 times. The value of 10,000 was selected because 9604 is the minimum size of samples required to estimate an error of 1 % with 95 % confidence [this is according to a conservative method; other methods also require <10,000 samples size (Newcombe 1998)]
    1. In this work, we develop the “Multi-Agent, Multi-Attitude” (MAMA) model which incorporates several key factors of attitude diffusion: (1) multiple, interacting attitudes; (2) social influence between individuals; and (3) media influence. All three components have strong support from the social science community.

      several key factors of attitude diffusion: 1. multiple, interacting attitudes 2. social influence between individuals 3. media influence

    1. Determinants and outcomes of physical activityin patients with COPD: a systematic review

      Determinants and outcomes of physical activity in patients with COPD: a systematic review

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  2. Nov 2022
    1. Trope, trope, trope, strung into a Gish Gallop.

      One of the issues we see in the Sunday morning news analysis shows (Meet the Press, Face the Nation, et al.) is that there is usually a large amount of context collapse mixed with lack of general knowledge about the topics at hand compounded with large doses of Gish Gallop and F.U.D. (fear, uncertainty, and doubt).

    1. Meta-analysis statistical procedures provide a measure of the difference between two groups thatis expressed in quantitative units that are comparable across studies

      The units are only "comparable across studies" if there weren't any mishaps (eg, clinical or methodological heterogeneity). If there's clinical heterogeneity, then we're probably comparing apples to oranges (ie, either participants, interventions, or outcomes are different among studies). If there's methodological heterogeneity, then that means there's a difference in study design

    1. PDF summary by Cochrane for planning a meta-analysis at the protocol stage. Gives guidance on how to anticipate & deal with various types of heterogeneity (clinical, methodological , & statistical). Link to paper

      Covers - ways to assess heterogeneity - courses of action if substantial heterogeneity is found - methods to examine the influence of effect modifiers (either to explore heterogeneity or because there's good reason to suggest specific features of participants/interventions/study types will influence effects of the intervention. - methods include subgroup analyses & meta-regression

    2. Statistical heterogeneity is the term given to differences in the effects of interventions and comesabout because of clinical and/or methodological differences between studies (ie it is a consequenceof clinical and/or methodological heterogeneity). Although some variation in the effects ofinterventions between studies will always exist, whether this variation is greater than what isexpected by chance alone needs to be determined.

      If the statistical heterogeneity is larger that what's expected by chance alone, then what does that imply? That there's either clinical or methodological heterogeneity within the pooled studies.

      What's the impact of the presence of clinical heterogeneity? The statistical heterogeneity (variation of effects/results of interventions) becomes greater than what's expected by chance alone

      What's happens if methodological heterogeneity is present? The statistical heterogeneity (variation of effects/results of interventions) becomes greater than what's expected by chance alone

    1. A typical ridiculous, unquestioned business adage is "If you can't measure it, you can't manage it." That's BS on the face of it, because the vast majority of important things we manage at work aren't measurable, from the quality of our new hires to the confidence we instill in a fledgling manager.
  3. Oct 2022
    1. t may be that in using his system hedeveloped his mind and his knowledge of history to the point wherehe expected his readers to draw more inferences from the facts heselected than most modern readers are accustomed to doing, in thisday of the predigested book.

      It's possible that the process of note taking and excerpting may impose levels of analysis and synthesis on their users such that when writing and synthesizing their works that they more subtly expect their readers to do the same thing when their audiences may require more handholding and explanation.

      Here, both the authors' experiences and that of the cultures in which they're writing will determine the relationship.


      There's lots of analogies between thinking and digesting (rumination, consumption, etc), in reading and understanding contexts.

    2. McMaster's Stephen Girard(1918), he said, was a "series of anecdotes . . . without connection"and with little interpretation or analysis." In Rhodes's last twovolumes the facts rarely appeared "to have meaning or to be partsof a coherent structure." " "No simple theme, like that whichdominated his great work, is apparent here. Mr. Rhodes has notseen any constructive unity in the years he covers. Instead of mak-ing a synthesis that would of itself lead the reader to a clearerunderstanding of American history . . . , he has developed his topicsparagraph by paragraph, with often abrupt transition from themeto theme." 26 His failure in the final product followed,

      Paxson would have considered it a failure in note taking to have only compiled but not to have synthesized one's accumulated knowledge.

      Why take notes if one is not going to use them to some end, whether that be personally in one's life, or to extend and expand the depth and breadth of human knowledge by analyzing and synthesizing the ideas to create something new for others' benefit?

    1. In the interest of reducing warranty claims (which are much more expensive than that incremental manufacturing cost) carmakers are sizing the whole unit to reliably accommodate the worst case draw (driver turns everything on at the same time, at idle).
    1. If not, his teacher and his fellow-pupils, trained alongthe same lines, would be quick to point out where he was wrong; for it wasthey whom he had to seek to persuade.

      Surely Sayers would be appalled by the current state of political argument... The "Sunday Shows" are full of talking points and all of the wrong sorts of "rhetoric" without much, if any basis in fact.

    1. and dissolves into the melting potto disappear in shame.

      Another nationalist rejection of assimiliation into other cultures, seeing it as "disappear"ing and "shame"ful.

    2. gave a lasting truth that         SpaniardIndianMestizowere all God’s children.

      Spanish law had very specific classes depending on your race, Spaniard, Indian, or Mestizo. Different laws applied to the different races, but they were all given protection under the law. This was very different from the way the English and Americans treated natives. The Catholic Church, being an important political aspect of Spain, reinforced this legal status as well.

    3. I am the eagle and serpentof Aztec civilization.

      According to the Wikipedia article on Aztec legend, they were told where to settle where they saw an eagle perched on a cactus, eating a snake. I believe this is saying that the speaker's cultural identity, and his strength of his conviction for la Raza, is the new frontier on which the descendants of the Aztec civilization should settle. This nationalism is the new foundation of the birthright of the Aztecs.

    4. MY OWN PEOPLE.

      I think this is a call to Nationalism, which was key to the manifesto of El Plan Espiritual de Aztlán. When the speaker is driven to tears, feeling hatred for the society oppressing him, he retreats to the safety of his cultural identity, of la Raza.

    5. thatmonstrous, technicalindustrial giant

      The industrial revolution, which I am studying in another literature class, had an enormous impact on agrarian lifestyles, and was not felt in the mostly agrarian areas of the US-Mexico border until later than it was in Europe or the American Northeast. The industrial processing of cash crops introduced the economy of scale into farming, and small, subsistence farming class was slowly strangled out, leaving super rich planters and landowners and laborers in the wake. The "monstrous, technical industrial giant," is the destruction of small farmers in favor of sharecropping and tenant farming.

    6. Yes,I have come a long way to nowhere,

      This is the quintessence of the immigrant experience into America, I feel. Having come a long way, only to wind up somewhere with no welcome for you, that will try to take your cultural identity from you or else punish you with economic want.

    7. My fathershave lost the economic battleand wonthe struggle of cultural survival

      I believe this couplet is a direct reference to El Plan Espiritual de Aztlán, the manifesto of economic recovery and cultural pride. These lines feel like the "thesis statement" of the poem, because of their position before the "And now!" and at the end of the introduction where we learn the sorry state of the speaker.

    1. here are several ways I havefound useful to invite the sociological imagination:

      C. Wright Mills delineates a rough definition of "sociological imagination" which could be thought of as a framework within tools for thought: 1. Combinatorial creativity<br /> 2. Diffuse thinking, flâneur<br /> 3. Changing perspective (how would x see this?) Writing dialogues is a useful method to accomplish this. (He doesn't state it, but acting as a devil's advocate is a useful technique here as well.)<br /> 4. Collecting and lay out all the multiple viewpoints and arguments on a topic. (This might presume the method of devil's advocate I mentioned above 😀)<br /> 5. Play and exploration with words and terms<br /> 6. Watching levels of generality and breaking things down into smaller constituent parts or building blocks. (This also might benefit of abstracting ideas from one space to another.)<br /> 7. Categorization or casting ideas into types 8. Cross-tabulating and creation of charts, tables, and diagrams or other visualizations 9. Comparative cases and examples - finding examples of an idea in other contexts and time settings for comparison and contrast 10. Extreme types and opposites (or polar types) - coming up with the most extreme examples of comparative cases or opposites of one's idea. (cross reference: Compass Points https://hypothes.is/a/Di4hzvftEeyY9EOsxaOg7w and thinking routines). This includes creating dimensions of study on an object - what axes define it? What indices can one find data or statistics on? 11. Create historical depth - examples may be limited in number, so what might exist in the historical record to provide depth.

  4. Sep 2022
    1. However, unevaluatedProperties has dynamic behavior, meaning that the set of properties to which it applies cannot be determined from static analysis of the schema (either the immediate schema object or any subschemas of that object).

      annotation meta: may need new tag:

      dynamic behavior vs. static analysis [not quite parallel]

      or can we reuse something else like?: lexical semantics vs. run-time semantics

    1. The idea that analysis must precede synthesis is old, of course. Galileo Galilei and René Descartes already thought it was necessary to distinguish between an analytic and a synthetic step in dealing with any problem.

      Langlois/Seignobos talk about this in their text Introduction aux études historiques (1879) as well, focusing especially on the analysis portion to have a solid base of historical information from which to build and create a synthesis.

    1. Taking carbon steel as an example, as shown in Picture 1, using a 1000w fiber laser cutting machine, for carbon steel materials thickness below 10mm, when the thickness of carbon steel is less than 2mm, the cutting speed per minute can be up to 8 meters. When the thickness is 6mm, the cutting speed is about 1.6 meters per minute, and when the thickness of the carbon steel is 10 mm, the cutting speed is about 0.6 to 0.7 meters per minute.

      Taking carbon steel as an example, as shown in Picture 1, using a 1000w fiber laser cutting machine, for carbon steel materials thickness below 10mm, when the thickness of carbon steel is less than 2mm, the cutting speed per minute can be up to 8 meters. When the thickness is 6mm, the cutting speed is about 1.6 meters per minute, and when the thickness of the carbon steel is 10 mm, the cutting speed is about 0.6 to 0.7 meters per minute.

      • Taking carbon steel as an example, as shown in Picture 1, using a 1000w fiber laser cutting machine, for carbon steel materials thickness below 10mm, when the thickness of carbon steel is less than 2mm, the cutting speed per minute can be up to 8 meters. When the thickness is 6mm, the cutting speed is about 1.6 meters per minute, and when the thickness of the carbon steel is 10 mm, the cutting speed is about 0.6 to 0.7 meters per minute.

      It can be seen that when the thickness of carbon steel material is less than 2mm, customers who attach great importance to cutting speed can consider using 2000W fiber laser cutting machine, but the 2000W machine is much higher than 1000W in equipment price and operating cost. When the carbon steel material is larger than 2mm, the 2000W machine is not much faster than the 1000W cutting speed. Therefore, the 1000W fiber laser cutting machine is more cost-effective than the 2000W fiber laser cutting machine.

      The cutting speed can directly reflect the efficiency of the fiber laser cutting machine. For cutting different materials with different thickness, the cutting speed will also change greatly. The thicker the thickness, the slower the speed!

  5. Aug 2022
    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2021, November 26). maybe this is a good moment to remind people that makers of mRNA vaccines have been extensively prepping for the possibility of new variants. Biontech/Pfizer have given a timeline of 100 days to the delivery of a retooled version of their vaccine [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1464225264523747359

    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2021, December 13). RT @DrEricDing: 11) Omicron is doubling every 1.6 days in UK 🇬🇧 according to @DrWilliamKu’s figure. That’s way faster growth than in South… [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1470451594378502154

    1. John Burn-Murdoch. (2021, November 25). Five quick tweets on the new variant B.1.1.529 Caveat first: Data here is very preliminary, so everything could change. Nonetheless, better safe than sorry. 1) Based on the data we have, this variant is out-competing others far faster than Beta and even Delta did 🚩🚩 https://t.co/R2Ac4e4N6s [Tweet]. @jburnmurdoch. https://twitter.com/jburnmurdoch/status/1463956686075580421

    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2021, December 9). a rather worrying development- a (local) newspaper “fact checking” the new German health minister simply by interviewing a virologist who happens to have a different view. There’s simply no established “fact” as to the severity of omicron in children at this point in time [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1469037817481334786

    1. I wanted to read this article because I love Kon's movies and I'm curious what the link to social media is.

    1. For the sake of simplicity, go to Graph Analysis Settings and disable everything but Co-Citations, Jaccard, Adamic Adar, and Label Propogation. I won't spend my time explaining each because you can find those in the net, but these are essentially algorithms that find connections for you. Co-Citations, for example, uses second order links or links of links, which could generate ideas or help you create indexes. It essentially automates looking through the backlinks and local graphs as it generates possible relations for you.
  6. Jul 2022
    1. Adversely, the Topics feature did not seem super helpful which was surprising because I initially thought that this feature would be helpful, but it just did not seem super relevant or accurate. Maybe this is because as a work of literature, the themes of the play are much more symbolic and figurative than the literal words that the play uses. Perhaps this function would work better for text that is more nonfiction based, or at least more literal. 

      I read your Voyant analysis of Henrik Ibsen's "A Doll's House," and I think we almost pick the same tools that we believe to be crucial for our text analysis. Like you, I mostly visualize my chosen literary work with Cirrus, Terms, Berry, and Trends. I also use links to ?look into how these words are used interdependently to contextualize the story told. I also had difficulty understanding how functions like Topics would benefit my understanding of the texts on a layered and complex level. I checked and thought maybe the problem was with the word count of the document. By default setting, Topics generates the first 1000 words in a document, and A Doll's House has 26210 words. In order to use this tool in the most efficient way possible, you can try to use the Topics slider ( the scroll bar) to adjust the number of topics you want to generate (max is 200). I have read A Doll's House before, so I couldn't speak for those who haven't. However, the clusters of chosen terms hint to me that this fiction deals with bureaucracy and finance via repeated words like "works," "money," and "paper." I can also recognize some words classified as names, so many characters are involved in the story. There is also a vague clue of the story's setting, which is during the winter season, from the repetition of the word "Christmas." It appears that someone is getting angry at someone for their wrongdoings, and this drama occurs in a family. While Topics cannot give me a complete storyline, it gives me a good chunk of puzzles to piece together the core gist of the story. It happened to me when I analyzed Herman Melville's Moby Dick. Words like "whale," "sea," "sailor," and "chase" allowed me to make a reasonable assumption that there was a group of sailors that went after a giant whale in the sea. I still prefer to use other tools, but that was how I utilized Topics for my knowledge of the text. I agree that text with more literal content, like self-help books, would definitely yield better results with Voyant Tools' Topics.

    1. Historical Context and Path Dependence

      … of the so-called path dependence and historical context in contextual political analysis. It analyzes the different meanings and uses of the concept of path dependence in contemporary …

    1. Path Dependence in Historical Sociology

      … This article does not seek to reorient all such modes of analysis toward the study of path dependence. Nevertheless, the article does seek to establish that path-dependent analysis …

    1. … This article does not seek to reorient all such modes of analysis toward the study of path dependence. Nevertheless, the article does seek to establish that path-dependent analysis …
    2. … of the so-called path dependence and historical context in contextual political analysis. It analyzes the different meanings and uses of the concept of path dependence in contemporary …
    3. J Mahoney, D Schensul - … of contextual political analysis, 2006 - scholars.northwestern.edu
  7. Jun 2022
    1. Thus flexibility is an important virtue in computer-assisted textual analysis, and testing a project on a subset of texts or methods can avoid wasted effort.

      Flexibility has almost become a sought-after characteristics of any projects ever conducted in this world, let alone those that belong to the school of humanities. Any individual or group entering a long-term project should be aware that predicting the outcome of the project is never a part of their project. It's impossible to identify and avoid surprise factors on a long road, but it's definitely possible to have an open mindset that's ready fpr any difficulty coming along the way and for brainstorming solutions that resolve this "shock". In many cases, these unexpected variables are what that renders the project memorable and special and sustainable and valid and reliable. In many cases, changing the initial direction of the project when faced with these unforeseen elements are for the better and produce even better results. Testing out different methods on textual analysis is a particularly great advice for those who are bound to carry a project in the coming future.

    1. pathways examined here addressed a nexus with six foci of analysis, which were chosen to represent important nature-related challenges to sustainable development and to reflect the underlying bodies of literature (e.g. food production is split between the land and the oceans). These six were considered separately while attending to interdependencies: ● Feeding humanity without deteriorating nature on land; ● Meeting climate goals while maintaining nature and nature's contributions to people; ● Conserving and restoring nature on land while contributing positively to human well-being; ● Maintaining freshwater for nature and humanity; ● Balancing food provision from oceans and coasts with nature protection; and ● Resourcing growing cities while maintaining the nature that underpins them.

      six focus areas of nexus analysis

    2. nexus analysis

      trans-disciplinary approach.

    1. The 1619 Project is more, however, than a national charter of grievances and despair. It is also mendacious

      mendacious is quite the loaded word.

    2. So with 1620, Wood seeks to take us not back to the ‘60s, nor to the decades that preceded it, but forward to a better place, one where we center our understanding of America on the ideals and customs that have allowed the country to overcome its challenges

      very positive judgment of Wood—"better place" (composition)

    3. As Wood makes clear at the start of 1620, “The larger aim of the 1619 Project is to change America’s understanding of itself,” and it is attempting to do that by misleading the nation’s most impressionable minds

      This example is interesting because of the use of "it"—this uses the language of judgement (to mislead is to do something unethical), but applying it to an agent-less target

    4. Why is this all needed? The 1619 Project is a venture by the Times to rewrite history and to put slavery at the center of America’s story. It contends that everything about our lives today still revolves around slavery and racism. Along the way, its authors have made a series of other outlandish claims

      Evaluation: Reaction? I think...

    5. “Our democracy’s founding ideals were false when they were written,” began the project’s foundational essay, by Nikole Hannah-Jones, the pugnacious architect of the 1619 Project.

      judgement: perhaps social sanction?

  8. May 2022
    1. This came in the context of weighing what she stood to gain and lose in leaving a staff job at BuzzFeed. She knew the worth of what editors, fact-checkers, designers, and other colleagues brought to a piece of writing. At the same time, she was tired of working around the “imperatives of social media sharing.” Clarity and concision are not metrics imposed by the Facebook algorithm, of course — but perhaps such concerns lose some of their urgency when readers have already pledged their support.

      Continuing with the idea above about the shift of Sunday morning talk shows and the influence of Hard Copy, is social media exerting a negative influence on mainstream content and conversation as a result of their algorithmic gut reaction pressure? How can we fight this effect?

    2. Matt Taibbi asked his subscribers in April. Since they were “now functionally my editor,” he was seeking their advice on potential reporting projects. One suggestion — that he write about Ibram X. Kendi and Robin DiAngelo — swiftly gave way to a long debate among readers over whether race was biological.

      There's something here that's akin to the idea of bikeshedding? Online communities flock to the low lying ideas upon which they can proffer an opinion and play at the idea of debate. If they really cared, wouldn't they instead delve into the research and topics themselves? Do they really want Taibbi's specific take? Do they want or need his opinion on the topic? What do they really want?

      Compare and cross reference this with the ideas presented by Ibram X. Kendi's article There Is No Debate Over Critical Race Theory.

      Are people looking for the social equivalent of a simple "system one" conversation or are they ready, willing, and able to delve into a "system two" presentation?

      Compare this also with the modern day version of the Sunday morning news (analysis) shows? They would seem to be interested in substantive policy and debate, but they also require a lot of prior context to participate. In essence, most speakers don't actually engage, but spew out talking points instead and rely on gut reactions and fear, uncertainty and doubt to make their presentations. What happened to the actual discourse? Has there been a shift in how these shows work and present since the rise of the Hard Copy sensationalist presentation? Is the competition for eyeballs weakening these analysis shows?

      How might this all relate to low level mansplaining as well? What are men really trying to communicate in demonstrating this behavior? What do they gain in the long run? What is the evolutionary benefit?

      All these topics seem related somehow within the spectrum of communication and what people look for and choose in what and how they consume content.

  9. Apr 2022
    1. Carl T. Bergstrom. (2021, August 18). 1. There has been lots of talk about recent data from Israel that seem to suggest a decline in vaccine efficacy against severe disease due to Delta, waning protection, or both. This may have even been a motivation for Biden’s announcement that the US would be adopting boosters. [Tweet]. @CT_Bergstrom. https://twitter.com/CT_Bergstrom/status/1427767356600688646

    1. Trevor Bedford. (2022, January 10). Given ~680k cases per day, this would in turn suggest 0.8% or 1% of the US being infected with SARS-CoV-2 every day. This would translate to perhaps 5% or 10% of individuals currently infected with SARS-CoV-2 in the US. 15/15 [Tweet]. @trvrb. https://twitter.com/trvrb/status/1480610448563060738

  10. Mar 2022
    1. A Narrative Framework for Understanding Experiences of People With Severe Mental Illnesses - https://is.gd/5pC1pA - urn:x-pdf:1e3bc85eda04e09f205615c0874637bb

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  11. Feb 2022
    1. incorporate their demographics, motivations (i.e. reasons for enrolling), engagement and learning outcomes to develop learner profiles. In that sense, a latent class analysis (LCA) is applied, an unsupervised machine learning technique

      methodology

    1. Yamasoba, D., Kimura, I., Nasser, H., Morioka, Y., Nao, N., Ito, J., Uriu, K., Tsuda, M., Zahradnik, J., Shirakawa, K., Suzuki, R., Kishimoto, M., Kosugi, Y., Kobiyama, K., Hara, T., Toyoda, M., Tanaka, Y. L., Butlertanaka, E. P., Shimizu, R., … Sato, K. (2022). Virological characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 BA.2 variant (p. 2022.02.14.480335). bioRxiv. https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.02.14.480335

    1. Gap analysis in 4 steps Instead of groping around in the dark, a gap analysis of the gap leads us through a detailed investigation of where our organization is currently and where we want to be. This allows us to act on the basis of facts, not on the basis of assumptions.

    1. Founded in partnership with a team of entrepreneurial journalists who believe in a better model to create excellent content while narrowing the synapse between elite creators and their audiences.

      http://puck.news/who-is-puck/

      Another platform play of journalists banding together to find a niche space of readers.

    1. https://puck.news/

      Along with the proliferation of newsletters and paid journalism spaces, is this another in the litany of sites that do news analysis while chasing eyeballs? Is it following in the tradition of the move from hard news (or tiny amounts of it) to loud news analysis a la Fox News?

      Will we see the volume and partisanship increase in this newsletter/paywall space over the next decade until the next thing arrives?

    1. Newsletters are an imperfect antidote to that, allowing writers a closer relationship with a more focused audience.

      The ultimate value of newsletters is their more direct connection to a specific niche audience for which they curate news or content. The value they provide readers is as a filter of their area with some some useful analysis and perspective.

  12. Jan 2022
    1. It’s a lot more work to give people an interesting puzzle to solve, support them with high expectations all the way through them doing something genuinely compelling and interesting with the synthesis (and they know when you’re just BSing them), and hold them to high standards while also modeling the appropriate behaviors yourself. It’s almost impossible with class sizes upwards of 40 and class periods of 40 minutes and most of the system isn’t actually optimized for achieving that anyway
    2. education has been moving farther and farther away from memorization-based learning. The standardized tests I give are modeled off of the AP History exams’ Document Based Questions, which prioritize analysis and communication skills over rote memorization.

      Education has been moving farther away from memorization-based learning and instead prioritizing analysis and communication skills.

  13. Dec 2021
    1. Eric Topol. (2021, October 27). 'The benefit of a third [booster] dose in reducing transmission is sizeable and increases with vaccine coverage and contact rates among individuals." https://medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.10.25.21265500v1 by @billygardner and @DiseaseEcology https://t.co/zAZcJgF1nJ [Tweet]. @EricTopol. https://twitter.com/EricTopol/status/1453153076165021696