34 Matching Annotations
  1. Dec 2022
    1. Rising greenhouse gas concentrations have resulted in detectable trends in average climate (particularly temperature), but also in changes in the timing of key seasons in some locations and in daily weather variability, including extreme weather and climate events like heat waves and droughts [10,11,12]. It is primarily through these changes in weather and seasonality, rather than through gradual, long-term trends, that climate change is likely to influence malaria risk. These impacts on malaria could occur both directly, as optimum climate ranges and critical thresholds for vector and parasite development are crossed, and indirectly, as society grapples with the disruptive effects of changes in weather patterns and seasonal cycles.
    2. Climate can influence malaria directly, through transmission dynamics, or indirectly, through myriad pathways including the many socioeconomic factors that underpin malaria risk. These indirect effects are largely unpredictable and so are not included in climate-driven disease models. Such models have been effective at predicting transmission from weeks to months ahead. However, due to several well-documented limitations, climate projections cannot accurately predict the medium- or long-term effects of climate change on malaria, especially on local scales. Long-term climate trends are shifting disease patterns, but climate shocks (extreme weather and climate events) and variability from sub-seasonal to decadal timeframes have a much greater influence than trends and are also more easily integrated into control programmes.
    1. Trends in some regions are clear, but insect biology, climate quirks, and public health preparedness will determine whether outbreaks occur.
    1. For effective vector control, the influence of climatic factors on vector-borne diseases should be studied since the mosquito vectors are also sensitive to the alterations in the climatic condition and the existing vector control approaches are inadequate to combat with the adverse effects of global warming.
    1. The models show moderate areal increase and altitudinal shift in the malaria-endemic areas in Greece in the future. The length of the transmission season is predicted to increase by 1 to 2 months, mainly in the mid-elevation regions and the Aegean Archipelago.
  2. May 2022
    1. Jesuit’s bark, also known to us as quinine, was an important anti-malarial drug. According to Molly Farrell, an associate professor of English and the history of science who first reported on Franklin’s abortion entry in Slate, it was also “mistakenly thought to be an abortifacient.” 
  3. Sep 2021
  4. Mar 2021
  5. Dec 2020
    1. damaged ring-form parasites (a process known as “pitting”)

      This is after treatment with artemisinins; kills the parasites. The removal of the dead parasites from previously infected RBCs without lysing them is called pitting. These previously infected RBCs return to the circulation, albeit their lifespan is shorter.

  6. Aug 2020
    1. Hogan, A. B., Jewell, B. L., Sherrard-Smith, E., Vesga, J. F., Watson, O. J., Whittaker, C., Hamlet, A., Smith, J. A., Winskill, P., Verity, R., Baguelin, M., Lees, J. A., Whittles, L. K., Ainslie, K. E. C., Bhatt, S., Boonyasiri, A., Brazeau, N. F., Cattarino, L., Cooper, L. V., … Hallett, T. B. (2020). Potential impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria in low-income and middle-income countries: A modelling study. The Lancet Global Health, 0(0). https://doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(20)30288-6

    1. Sherrard-Smith, E., Hogan, A. B., Hamlet, A., Watson, O. J., Whittaker, C., Winskill, P., Ali, F., Mohammad, A. B., Uhomoibhi, P., Maikore, I., Ogbulafor, N., Nikau, J., Kont, M. D., Challenger, J. D., Verity, R., Lambert, B., Cairns, M., Rao, B., Baguelin, M., … Churcher, T. S. (2020). The potential public health consequences of COVID-19 on malaria in Africa. Nature Medicine, 1–6. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41591-020-1025-y

  7. May 2020
  8. Apr 2020
  9. May 2017
    1. Africa Fighting Malaria

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    2. Africa Fighting Malaria

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    1. Africa Fighting Malaria

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    2. Africa Fighting Malaria

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    1. Africa Fighting Malaria

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    2. Africa Fighting Malaria

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    1. Africa Fighting Malaria

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    2. Africa Fighting Malaria

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    1. Africa Fighting Malaria

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    2. Africa Fighting Malaria

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

  10. paradigmsanddemographics.blogspot.com paradigmsanddemographics.blogspot.com
    1. Africa Fighting Malaria

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    2. Africa Fighting Malaria

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.