3 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2022
    1. If you give a title to your notes, "claim notes" are simply notes with a verb. They invite you to say: "Prove it!" - "The positive impact of PKM" (not a claim) - "PKM has a positive impact in improving writer's block" (claim) A small change with positive mindset consequences

      If you give a title to your notes, "claim notes" are simply notes with a verb.<br><br>They invite you to say: "Prove it!"<br><br>- "The positive impact of PKM" (not a claim)<br>- "PKM has a positive impact in improving writer's block" (claim)<br><br>A small change with positive mindset consequences

      — Bianca Pereira | PKM Coach and Researcher (@bianca_oli_per) October 6, 2022
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      Bianca Pereira coins the ideas of "concept notes" versus "claim notes". Claim notes are framings similar to the theorem or claim portion of the mathematical framing of definition/theorem(claim)/proof. This set up provides the driving impetus of most of mathematics. One defines objects about which one then advances claims for which proofs are provided to make them theorems.

      Framing one's notes as claims invites one to provide supporting proof for them to determine how strong they may or may not be. Otherwise, ideas may just state concepts which are far less interesting or active. What is one to do with them? They require more active work to advance or improve upon in more passive framings.

      link to: - Maggie Delano's reading framing: https://hypothes.is/a/4xBvpE2TEe2ZmWfoCX_HyQ

    1. For her online book clubs, Maggie Delano defines four broad types of notes as a template for users to have a common language: - terms - propositions (arguments, claims) - questions - sources (references which support the above three types)

      I'm fairly sure in a separate context, I've heard that these were broadly lifted from her reading of Mortimer J. Adler's How to Read a book. (reference? an early session of Dan Allosso's Obsidian Book club?)

      These become the backbone of breaking down a book and using them to have a conversation with the author.

  2. Jun 2022
    1. Compass Points, a routine for examining propositions.

      via https://pz.harvard.edu/sites/default/files/Compass%20Points_0.pdf

      • E- excited
      • W- worrisome
      • N - need to know
      • S - stance or suggestion for moving forward

      These could be used as a simple set of rules for thumb for evaluating and expanding on ideas in note taking or social annotation settings.

      Compare these with the suggestions of Tiago Forte in his book Building a Second Brain. Which is better? More comprehensive? Are there any ideas missing in a broader conceptualization? Is there a better acronymization or analogy for such a technique?