23 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2022
  2. Jun 2022
    1. First, the majority population in eastern Virginia were enslaved blacks. Whites lived in constant fear of slave insurrection. Everyone knew about the 1739 slave rebellion in Stono, S.C., when blacks broke into a store, decapitated the shopkeepers, seized guns and powder, and marched with flying banners, beating drums and cries of “Liberty!” Up to 100 joined the rebellion before being engaged by a contingent of armed, mounted militiamen. Scores died in the ensuing battle.
    1. It is a fact that lands have been sold for five shillings, which were worth one hundred pounds: if sheriffs, thus immediately under the eye of our state legislature and judiciary, have dared to commit these outrages, what would they not have done if their masters had been at Philadelphia or New York?

      This is almost hilarious in light of how the U.S. Government has since repeatedly dispossessed Indigenous Americans of their lands for far less than "five shillings."

  3. Apr 2022
  4. Jan 2022
    1. For republic-lovers, political liberty means not unbridled freedom to do whatever one pleases (negative liberty), but to live by laws made by citizens themselves, that are a product of their own will, not the arbitrary will of others.

      What is negative liberty

  5. Dec 2021
  6. Nov 2021
    1. The liberal philosopher John Stuart Mill, writing at about the same time as Hawthorne, made a similar argument. Much of his most famous book, On Liberty, is dedicated not to governmental restraints on human liberty but to the threat posed by social conformism, by “the demand that all other people shall resemble ourselves.”
  7. Sep 2021
    1. "Human nature is not a machine to be built after a model, and set to do exactly the work prescribed for it, but a tree which requires to grow and develop itself on all sides, according to the tendency of the inward forces which make it a living thing. Such are the differences among human beings in their sources of pleasure, their susceptibilities of pain, and the operation on them of different physical and moral agencies, that unless there is a corresponding diversity in their modes of life, they neither obtain their fair share of happiness, nor grow up to the mental, moral, and aesthetic stature of which their nature is capable." John Stuart Mill, On Liberty (1859)
    1. liberty of conscience

      "Liberty of conscience" is a phrase Roger Williams uses in a religious context to denote the freedom for one to follow his or her religious or ethical beliefs. It is an idea that refers to conscious-based thought and individualism. Each person has the right to their own conscience. It is rooted in the idea that all people are created equal and that no culture is better than the other.

      This idea is strongly tied to: freedom from coercion of conscience (own thoughts and ideas), equality of rights, respect and toleration. It is a fundamental element of what has come to be the "American idea of religious liberty". Williams spoke of liberty of conscience in reference to a religious sense. This concept of individualism and free belief was later extrapolated in a general sense. He believed that government involvement ended when it came to divine beliefs.

      Citation: Eberle, Edward J. "Roger Williams on Liberty of Conscience." Roger Williams University Law Review: vol 10:, iss: 2, article 2, pp. 288-311. http://docs.rwu.edu/rwu_LR/vol10/iss2/2. Accessed 8 Sept. 2021.

  8. Mar 2021
  9. Sep 2020
  10. Aug 2020
  11. Jul 2020
  12. Apr 2018
    1. liberty to human happiness.

      I've often wondered why, and often had to be sure my students understood, that Jefferson used "the pursuit of happiness" rather than Locke's more direct reference to property rights. Obviously Mill wrote after Jefferson, so my question is did Jefferson borrow this "utilitarian" adaptation from any particular writer or thinker and were Mill & Bentham reading the same literature years later. Just curious.

  13. Jun 2017
  14. Mar 2017
    1. The fact that the church of our country, (with fractional exceptions), does not esteem “the Fugitive Slave Law” as a declaration of war against religious liberty, implies that that church regards religion simply as a form of worship, an empty ceremony, and not a vital principle, requiring active benevolence, justice, love and good will towards man.

      Douglass describes how religious liberty seems hollow in the country if the principles of Christianity aren't practiced along with mere preaching. He also uses strong language concerning the Fugitive Slave law as a "declaration of war" against religious liberty. This is an interesting point, as he views the law as hindering his and other Christians' ability to carry out and practice Christianity by helping fugitive slaves. This idea of too much government causing suppression of religion correlates to Thoreau's minimalistic desires of government

  15. Apr 2015
  16. learn-eu-central-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.content.blackboardcdn.com learn-eu-central-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.content.blackboardcdn.com
    1. Name /yal05/27282_u00 01/27/06 10:25AM Plate # 0-Composite pg 6 # 6  1 0  1 “Human nature is not a machine to be built after a model, and set to do exactly the work prescribed for it, but a tree, which requires to grow and develop itself on all sides, according to the tendency of the inward forces which make it a living thing.” “Such are the differences among human beings in their sources of plea- sure, their susceptibilities of pain, and the operation on them of differ- ent physical and moral agencies, that unless there is a corresponding di- versity in their modes of life, they neither obtain their fair share of happiness, nor grow up to the mental, moral, and aesthetic stature of which their nature is capable.” JohnStuartMill, On Liberty (1859
  17. Sep 2013
    1. Next comes liberality; liberal people let their money go instead of fighting for it, whereas other people care more for money than for anything else.

      Interesting to see liberty and liberalism defined.