91 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2022
    1. I’d be interested in hearing more about the ways oral cultures did their thinking, if you have resources on that handy. Otherwise if you recall your source for that could you pass it on?

      Below are some sources to give you a start on orality. I've arranged them in a suggested watching/reading order with some introductory material before more technical sources which will give you jumping off points for further research.

      • Modern Memory, Ancient Methods. TEDxMelbourne. Melbourne, Australia, 2018. https://www.ted.com/talks/lynne_kelly_modern_memory_ancient_methods.
      • Kelly, Lynne. The Memory Code. Allen & Unwin, 2016.
      • Kelly, Lynne. Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies: Orality, Memory and the Transmission of Culture. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781107444973.
      • Ong, Walter J. Orality and Literacy: The Technologizing of the Word. Taylor & Francis, 2007.
      • Parry, Milman, and Adam Parry. The Making of Homeric Verse: The Collected Papers of Milman Parry. Oxford University Press, 1971.
      • Neale, Margo, and Lynne Kelly. Songlines: The Power and Promise. First Knowledges, 1.0. Thames & Hudson, 2020.
  2. Jun 2022
    1. The course Marginalia in Books from Christopher Ohge is just crying out to have an annotated syllabus.

      Wish I could follow along directly, but there's some excellent reference material hiding in the brief outline of the course.


      Perhaps a list of interesting people here too for speaking at https://iannotate.org/ 2022 hiding in here? A session on the history of annotation and marginalia could be cool there.

    2. https://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/25322

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Jeremy Cherfas</span> (email) (<time class='dt-published'>06/16/2022 07:18:14</time>)</cite></small>

  3. Mar 2022
    1. when I look at climate change as as a issue, I look at it as a journalistic issue. I think that it's not been communicated honestly by journalists for a long time. I think that's our main problem. I think that journalists haven't approached climate change with the same level of vigor and ruthlessness that they've covered other political topics. I think it's because for some reason, the fossil fuel industry has convinced them that that there is no corruption to be seen here. There's a reluctance among journalists today to take climate change seriously as a corruption story, which is the heart of what our profession does. And I think that that's harming democracy, because people don't see climate change the way that they should, in the most truthful way.
    1. The Democratic National Committee’s decision on fossil fuel subsidies is a good example of this. As HuffPost’s Alex Kaufman first reported, the DNC recently erased previously-approved language from its party platform calling for an end to fossil fuel tax breaks. The DNC did this without telling anyone, and have so far refused to explain its decision. Why should taxpayers continue to artificially prop up the industry that causes climate change to the tune of at least $20 billion a year? I don’t know, but the DNC prioritizes climate change, OK?
    1. Energy must be just about the most socially conservative – no, I will use the correct word, backward – industry in the world. At times it seems as if the main criterion for leadership is to be a straight white male, born between 1950 and 1965. This is starting to change, but not fast enough. Women are disproportionately disadvantaged by energy poverty, bearing the extra workload and health impacts of cooking with traditional biomass. Access to modern energy is essential for women to enjoy basic healthcare, particularly during childbirth, and for girls to have time to study1. Gender in the energy sector is not just a question of fairness, it is also a question of effectiveness. Women may hold up half the sky, but more importantly they also buy half the world’s appliances, half the world’s energy and half the world’s cars – and, if they do not, they should and soon will. They are a huge part of the market the energy industry needs to understand. Women also offer half the world’s talent. There is a growing body of work showing that those companies that have diverse management teams and boards outperform those that do not.
    2. Clean energy is inherently more local, more distributed, more accountable. While Germany’s big four utilities own the bulk of the fossil and nuclear generating capacity, they own only a small proportion of its renewable energy capacity; the general public owns many gigawatts of the latter either directly or via retail funds. Some may find wind farms ugly, some may find them beautiful; either way, they make us talk about the trade-offs we are making to generate electricity. In the past, there were no discussions about the relative aesthetics of open-cast coal mines and gas fields in far-away countries.
    3. There is, however, a third level on which the struggle between defenders of clean and fossil energy must be understood, and that is in terms of the social structures in which we want to live. Fossil-based energy lends itself to scale and centralization. Physical centralization – huge oil, gas and coal-fields, massive power stations, a universal grid, pipelines, refineries and the like – as well as the inevitable fellow-travellers of political and economic centralization.
    4. In 1995, when Saro-Wiwa was judicially murdered, I felt helpless. Now, however, I do not. Back then it was impossible to envisage a different world. Back then, health, wealth and happiness were inextricably linked to fossil fuels and their attendant corrupt, corrosive centralization of power. Now we know another way is possible. Back then I was a news industry executive, now I am playing my bit part as the world moves from old energy to new.
  4. Jan 2022
    1. You could imagine employers shipping corporate laptops with pre-installed notes to make it easier to transfer (previously tacit) knowledge and thus improve the onboarding process for new hires.

      Using Hypothes.is as an annotation layer for internal company notes in a private space could be an interesting way for easing on-boarding.

      In some sense, this is a little bit of what the annotated syllabus is doing for students at the beginning of a course (in addition to helping to onboard them to the idea of social annotation at the same time.)

  5. Dec 2021
    1. Another angle to be analyzed further is that as web page sizes increase, the metrics Page Load Time and Page Render Time have larger impact on energy usage on the client side [31].

      This is the first time I've seen a paper refer to the client side rendering of pages as a factor

    1. While Cisco foresaw an average annual growth rate of 26% for the entire IP trafficover the period 2017-2022 (Cisco 2018), it foresaw an average annual growth rate of 46% for theglobal RAN traffic over the same period (Cisco 2019). As a consequence, the share of radio access iscontinuously increasing, from just 1% in 2010 to over 16% today (see Figure 5)

      In 2020, the split is about %16 mobile vs 84% fixed access.

      You might not use these for the web tho, as so much computer to computer transfer is only fixed to fixed

    2. According to (Aslan et al. 2018), the energy intensity of the Internet has decreased onaverage by 30% per year. This corresponds to a halving over 2 years, and to a reduction by a factor of30 over a decade.

      Over the same period solar has come down in price at around 20% per year

    3. To compute the overall energy consumption of the Internet in the US, both (Gupta and Singh 2003)and (Koomey et al. 2004) start their analysis from a detailed inventory of computing and networking

      For the last twenty years we have had almost 10x differences in expected energy use figures

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. Supplier must publicly disclose its Scope 1 Emissions, Scope 2 Emissions, and Scope 3 Emissions within twelve (12) months of the Effective Date.

      Must publicly disclose

    2. Without affecting any other right or remedy available to it, SFDC may terminate the Agreement by giving one (1) month written notice to Supplier if the Supplier’s environmental practices or negative environmental impacts, in SFDC’s reasonablediscretion, could have a material negative impact on SFDC’s reputation as a result of conflicting with SFDC’s published sustainability, carbon reduction, and renewable energy targets.

      Holy balls - anyone sellling to SFDC agree to a month month kill clause if they're caught doing stuff that would have a material impact on SFDC's reputation?

    3. publicly disclose that Supplier has incorporated the Sustainability Exhibit into an agreement with SFDC

      Ahhh! So this, if you squint, is a bit like the "publish the license" aspect of OSS licenses like MIT, Apache 2 and the rest.

    4. Supplier must maintain a Sustainability Scorecard and if requested by SFDC, provide a copy of such Sustainability Scorecard to SFDC on an annual basis promptly following Supplier’s receipt of a Sustainability Scorecard from Supplier’s Sustainability Scorecard provider. For purposes of this section: “Sustainability Scorecard” means a corporate social responsibility assessment report prepared by a reputable provider that is reasonably acceptable to SFDC.

      This sustainability score card:

      corporate social responsibility assessment report prepared by a reputable provider

    5. Supplier agrees to (i) review and share with its relevant subcontractors SFDC’s relevant sustainability best practices guidance within ten (10) businessdays of SFDC providing such guidelines to Supplier and (ii) use commercially reasonable efforts to comply, and cause its relevant subcontractors to comply, with SFDC’s relevant sustainability best practices guidance.

      Ah, so this is the cascading mechanism in effect here. This is what we tried back in 2011 with AMEE, but we didn't think about using contract law as a lever in this way - ours all about implicit pressure from the big supplier we were working with

    6. 2.2.3.To verify the Products and/or Services were provided on a Carbon Neutral Basis, Supplier agrees to provide SFDC with (i) a Carbon Neutrality Attestation no later than January 15 of each year and (ii) each Emissions Report no later than sixty (60) days after the expiration of the applicable Emissions Reporting Period, in each case in form and substance reasonably satisfactory to SFDC. Supplier will use commercially reasonable efforts to promptly respond to any inquiries or requests for clarification from SFDC related to any Carbon Neutrality Attestation or Emissions Report.

      LOL, this is basically what we asked for when they got in touch with us. If the language here is in the TCLP clauses, then it might be worth adopting in our T's and C's too

    7. “Carbon Neutrality Fee” means (i) with respect to Supplier’s failure to deliver the Products and/or Services on a Carbon Neutral Basis, an amount equal to the cost of carbon credits that must be purchased to offset each metric ton of CO2e that the Total Emissions, as stated in a given Emissions Report or as reasonably determined by SFDC, exceed zer

      Wow, so this shifts the carbon neutralitry burden to the supplier, so SFDC can reasonably expect their scope 3 emissions from this supplier to be zero?

    8. Supplier represents and warrants that (i) Supplierhas operated in material compliance with all Environmental Laws, (ii) Supplier has not received written notice of material violation of Environmental Law with respect to the Products and/or Services or Supplier has remediated any material violations of Environmental Law for which it has received notice, and (iii) Supplier has provided SFDC with reasonable detail of all environmental practices or negative environmental impacts, that, in SFDC’s reasonable discretion, could have a material negative impact on SFDC’s reputation as a result of conflicting with SFDC’s published sustainability, carbon reduction, or renewable energy targets

      Ahh… this is interesting - it's essentially compelling the supplier to make a statement that that they're not breaking any environmental laws

    9. if Supplier has not already set a science-based target,and shall promptly provide a copy of the Plan to SFDC on request. For purposes of this section: “Carbon Footprint” means the amount of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions (CO2e) that will be released into the atmosphere as a result of the provision of the Products and/or Services, determined in accordance with international carbon reporting practice, being the accepted practice from time to time in relation to reporting for the purposes of the protocols to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

      Note to follow up - these plans might not be public, but this implies that they might used as for inter-org comms

    10. one-half of one percent (0.5%) of the aggregate amount paid by SFDC to Supplier or invoiced by Supplier to SFDC over the prior twelve (12) months.

      So a 100k project amounts to a 500 fee for non compliance

    11. “Climate Deficiency” means (i) a material breach of Section 2.2(Carbon Neutrality; Climate Reporting)of the Sustainability Exhibit (if applicable) or (ii) any other material breach of this Sustainability Exhibit.

      This is a new term for me, and I wonder if it's in the TCLP clauses or coming from SFDC

    1. Distribution of solar, uranium, and oil densities across nations. Data are from EIA (2019) for oil; OECD (2019) for uranium; UNdata (2019) for area; and OpenEI (2019) for solar illumination. The x- and y-axes share the same logarithmic scaling. Countries with land area below 5000 km2 are not included.

      Nice! These are the underlying sources of data for the image shared on twitter

  6. Sep 2021
    1. 2020 is the year in which the current Dutch subsidy scheme for renewable energy, the Renewable Energy Production Incentive Scheme (de stimuleringsregeling duurzame energieproductie (SDE+)), will change. From 2020 onwards, the SDE + will be broadened to achieve the target of a 49 percent reduction in CO2 emissions in the Netherlands by 2030 (or at least to keep this goal within reach). The broadened SDE+ focuses on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions (CO2 and other greenhouse gases). This will change the focus from energy production to energy transition. The broadened subsidy scheme is therefore called the Renewable Energy Transition Incentive Scheme (SDE++).

      So, this is the expanded version that is focussed on a more holistic, systemic approach

  7. Aug 2021
    1. We’ll engage with a wide variety of textual genres—essays, poetry, songs, creative non-fiction pieces, news media, academic articles, and film,

      Various ways to interact with one another and understand the information in different ways. I like how many ways of learning there are in this class

  8. Apr 2021
    1. But syllabi, as long as I’ve known them, are too often defensive documents aimed at controlling students through absurd levels of bureaucracy.

      This is certainly an apt definition of syllabi

  9. Mar 2021
    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Remi Kalir</span> in Annotate Your Syllabus 3.0 (<time class='dt-published'>03/13/2021 14:18:33</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Because annotating a syllabus conveys a message–from day one–that course documents are not static artifacts, that something authored by an instructor is not unwelcoming of feedback, and that student voice is both appreciated and necessary for a shared endeavor.

      This helps to turn the class into a community.

      It also establishes the class as an ongoing conversation of learning with all the participants.

      It sets up the teacher not simply as the unquestionable "sage-on-the-stage" but as a guide through the material.

      If we didn't question our teachers, their ideas, their writings, and learn new things, we could have stopped at Aristotle and everyone would still think the Earth was the center of the universe and that feathers fall as fast as bowling balls.

    2. Annotate Your Syllabus 3.0

      Potential sub-title: "The syllabus is a living conversation"

  10. Feb 2021
    1. online curation is:

      The most prominent example of this type of online curation, in my personal experience as a teacher, is curating reading lists for my university courses.

      In some cases (more "traditional"), this list is part of the syllabus and coursepack that I distribute ahead of the semester so it's something that I would do in the Summer or during a Winter break. Having taught several courses on a short notice (getting the contract a couple of weeks before the semester starts), I've fine-tuned my technique to be as efficient as possible. Some of my reading lists were better than others and a few were really solid. Teaching with such a reading list is quite a joy. Much more so than teaching from a textbook. At one point, I stopped having printed coursepacks. I simply give links to the fulltext articles available through #OpenAccess or through the databases to which the university's library is subscribed. A few students complained early on but it does mean that they don't have to purchase text material for the course. The reason it's important to me does have to do with the cost of higher education. It's also about shifting the role of text resources. We use these texts to do some work together. It's not like these texts are "transmitting the knowledge" to learners' brains.

      So, that's my more traditional pattern: a syllabus with a list of links to articles (typically PDFs) that I distributed before the semester starts.

      In other cases (my "enhanced" practice), it's something I do every week, based on what has happened in the course. And I do mean a full reading list each week. Class members choose the text on which they want to focus. Though several of them expect me to be "the sage on the stage" who will lead them to that one nugget of wisdom they will have to "retain", a shift happens once they take ownership of those reading choices. That practice is quite timeconsuming and it doesn't necessarily improves my teaching in obvious ways. It's rewarding in other ways. (I sometimes ask learners to find resources on their own, which really deepens the learning process. It requires a significant level of autonomy that they might not reveal during a given semester, even if they have significant experience as university students).

      My routine of building weekly reading lists also means that I got quite a bit of practice at this.

      Typically, I start the collecting with a "forward citation search" in Web of Knowledge, Scopus, or Google Scholar. I often know this one key article which is likely to have been cited by a number of authors more recently. I collect as many of those as possible and some patterns emerge. Quite frequently, there would be subtopics that I rearrange. It might send me in a "rabbithole". Which is ok. I'm in a discovery mode. And some of the texts which fall under my radar at that point become relevant at a further point.

      In other words, I often cast a wide net during the collection phase.

      The selection process is mostly a matter or rearranging the reading list so that the first few items cover enough of the range of subtopics. Sometimes, my lists remain quite long, which means that learners have more choice (which is uncomfortable enough to help them learn). It also involves an organization phase.

      Summarizing the significance of the collection is the basis for my presentation of the list to the class. My description of the collection is the moment in a class meeting during which I switch to lecture mode. If I do it at the end of the class meeting (or just before the break), students are likely to pay less attention, even though it's typically short. If I do If I do it before discussing the items for the current week, it gets a bit confusing. So it often works best if I present this list after we've worked through the previous ones but before some kind of activity which links the two topics.

      As for sharing in the cloud, I typically do this through the LMS I'm using in that institutions. I've tried more public methods but they weren't that effective.

      All this to say... I could probably optimize my method.

    1. Course content headings should stand out in terms of font and position relative to other wording and outline. Use of bullets, italics and balancing does not enhance readability. Also, consistency of the columns and layout for the table are off, causing inconsistency and confusion due to improper alignments and proportion lacking overall for the contents table and outline. Topic headers are of the same color, value, shape and form for calling out new and important categories, where they should have different shape and form as well as alignment. Additional emphasis could be added to grading section to call out evaluative criteria for this are. Movement from section to section should be consistent with formatting and shapes as well as alignments that guide reader and students strategically. Hyperlinks could be properly formatted to allow for seamless movement through syllabus allowing for better connectivity and fluidity. More strategic use of images that guide learner in direction of necessary materials and reading texts associated with the class, which also allow for a variety and contrast between themes and required materials.

  11. Jan 2021
    1. And they have direct bearing on classroom practice — if I am to choose between the two, the choice is clear.

      Of course I agree... if students must be at war, or must be in a dance, I choose dance. And yet, when we see sea lions "dancing" on issues which are life-and-death to the other person in the argument, we see how mismatched metaphors create strife.

  12. Sep 2020
  13. Mar 2020
    1. Before posting your question to a discussion board, check if anyone has asked it already and received a reply. Just as you wouldn’t repeat a topic of discussion right after it happened in real life, don’t do that in discussion boards either.

      Read everyone else's post before posting your own question.

      Stay on topic, don't post irrelevant links, comments thoughts or pictures. Don't type in leetspeak, abbreviations, ALL CAPS, etc.

      Be polite, say please and thank you when soliciting help from your classmates.

      Respect the opinions of your classmates if you disagree. Acknowledge valid points and understand others are entitled to have their own perspective on the issue.

      Be brief when posting in the discussion boards.

      Try and quote what your classmate said if you are referring to something specific. Give them credit.

      Be forgiving of your classmates, they are learning and they too make mistakes.

      Run a spelling or grammar check before posting anything to the discussion board. I'd recommend Grammar.ly.

      Compose your discussion board post in a word or google document and then copy and paste it (save your responses for posterity).

    1. Netiquette Tips

      You will be asked to participate in online discussions and engage with your peers. You should adhere to the following general guidelines (on top of any specific assignment instructions):

      • Use proper language
      • Be precise
      • Avoid emoticons or "leetspeak".
      • Be explanatory. Justify your opinion.
      • Read all comments before hitting submit.
      • Recognize and respect diversity.
      • Tone down your language
      • Control your temper
      • Take your post seriously.
      • Be credible, use sources.
    1. Designing a Course Syllabus

      The ultimate goal of a well-designed syllabus, therefore, is to inform students about what is expected of them throughout the semester by outlining content, requirements, policies, and due dates.


      notes


      0:20 - 2:45 Introductions

      2:50 - 3:35 Workshop Objectives

      Course Syllabus as a roadmap 3:56

      Syllabus will be first substantial means of communication with students.

      • Easy to read
      • Roadmap for the semester
      • Primary source of info to guide students for semester.
      • Acts as a Teaching Outline

      4:53 Purpose of a Course Syllabus

      Accessibility and Accomodations

  14. Jan 2020
  15. Aug 2019
  16. Jul 2019
  17. Apr 2019
  18. Aug 2018
    1. INTE 5100 – Planning and Design for Instruction

      Thanks for jumping into our evolving and annotated course contract (i.e. syllabus). This is a shared space for continued discussion and negotiation about the course (and also a chance to learn/play with Hypothesis).

      A few ways annotation might be useful here:

      • Discuss specific terminology or phrasing.
      • Ask contextual questions about specific course details.
      • Provide links to other connected resources.
    1. Hypothes.is: A social annotation tool.

      I'm quite excited that we'll be using this tool in class. I just came across a tweet (and blog post) about annotating your syllabus, and I was curious about how it might work with students. I'm happy to be experiencing it as a student!

    1. Educators – across disciplines, grade levels, and institutional contexts – appear interested in annotating their syllabi with their students
  19. May 2018
  20. Feb 2018
  21. Aug 2017
  22. mimno.infosci.cornell.edu mimno.infosci.cornell.edu
    1. Using other people's code is an important part of programming, but for group projects the code should be substantially the work of the group members except for standard libraries.
    2. LaptopsIn order to facilitate interactive in-class work, you are allowed to bring a laptop.
    3. "Multitasking" is a myth.
    4. If you have a laptop, you will be expected to use it for relevant work.
    5. Work in pairs will be encouraged.
    6. A typical week
  23. Jul 2017
  24. Jun 2017
  25. Feb 2017
  26. Jan 2017
    1. I have said to you that I would eliminate the liquor agents in this state and that the money saved would be returned to our citizens . . . I am happy to report to you that I am now filling orders for several hundred one-way tickets and stamped on them are these words . . . "for liquor agents . . . destination: . . . out of Alabama." I am happy to report to you that the big-wheeling cocktail-party boys have gotten the word that their free whiskey and boat rides are over . . . that the farmer in the field, the worker in the factory, the businessman in his office, the housewife in her home, have decided that the money can be better spent to help our children's education and our older citizens . . . and they have put a man in office to see that it is done. It shall be done. Let me say one more time . . . . no more liquor drinking in your governor's mansion.

      This hearkens so much to current day - everyone's focused on jobs and politicians are using weird backward economic logic to further their own unreasonable beliefs. We can look back now and say prohibition really was not that great for the economy, or the poor and working class, but that wasn't even on anyone's radar.

  27. Dec 2016
    1. E58.2167 TRANSNATIONAL MEDIA FLOWS

      syllabus from nyu

    Tags

    Annotators

  28. Oct 2016
    1. Wobble occurs routinely in the classroom when something unexpected emerge

      A daily, weekly, and yearly occurrence in every classroom given the shifting students.

    2. taking a culturally proactive stance toward your practice and seeing yourself as a writer, a curator of curriculum, and so on

      and a developer of human beings. Tis' important to remember how much this rubs off on others even if the intention is not so.

    3. collaborate with colleagues who provide moral support and at the same time challenge our thinking

      YES!!! Again, great resource for open observation and feedback: http://robertkaplinsky.com/observeme/

    4. not about an endpoint; it is a framework to help acknowledge how one’s practice changes over time and requires constant adaptation

      Just like our students, it seems when they see this they begin to adopt similar viewpoints and practices

    5. reflect on areas in which they wobble with the intent of attaining flow

      A great testimony to reflective practice. It seems some of the very best educators understand this concept at its core.

    6. a lifelong practice, and one never quite arrives at a perpetual state of flow.

      Very well put, I'm adopting this specific language to my practice as this is how I view it. Thanks for putting it in such eloquent words for me!

    7. To progress in yoga, practitioners learn to hold familiar poses for extended periods of time and to gradually add more difficult poses to their repertoire

      In addition to new poses that combine their previous knowledge and expertise, seems to be quite the connection with teaching

    8. we don’t view them as liabilities, but as challenges that can further our pro-fessional growth.

      Growth mindsets vs fixed mindsets, this is what teaching is all about - learning at the core. Brought to mind this observation movement I ran across recently: http://robertkaplinsky.com/observeme/

  29. Jun 2016
    1. If only 2% – 5% of all faculty and their students (who are doing renewable assignments) were active creators and improvers of OER, that would likely be sufficient.
    1. students to find three credible sources on narrative to use in a short piece of writing
    2. the possibility that learners may engage more effectively by finding their own resources to share and then seeing how others respond.
    1. similar to picking texts for the course well in advance

      Though the advice makes a lot of sense, leaving it aside makes for a very empowering experience.

  30. Feb 2016
  31. Nov 2015
  32. Feb 2014
    1. Lecture 1: The Foundations of Copyright Law

      Readings:

      • 17 U.S.C. 102
      • Feist Publications, Inc. v. Rural Telephone Service Co., 499 U.S. 340 (1991)
      • Mannion v. Coors Brewing Co., 377 F.Supp. 2d 444 (S.D.N.Y. 2005)
      • Alexander v. Haley, 460 F.Supp. 40 (S.D.N.Y. 1978)
  33. Aug 2013
    1. A pregnant single woman (Roe) brought a class action challenging the constitutionality of the Texas criminal abortion laws, which proscribe procuring or attempting an abortion except on medical advice for the purpose of saving the mother's life. A licensed physician (Hallford), who had two state abortion prosecutions pending against him, was permitted to intervene. A childless married couple (the Does), the wife not being pregnant, separately attacked the laws, basing alleged injury on the future possibilities of contraceptive failure, pregnancy, unpreparedness for parenthood, and impairment of the wife's health. A three-judge District Court, which consolidated the actions, held that Roe and Hallford, and members of their classes, had standing to sue and presented justiciable controversies. Ruling that declaratory, though not injunctive, relief was warranted, the court declared the abortion statutes void as vague and overbroadly infringing those plaintiffs' Ninth and Fourteenth Amendment rights. The court ruled the Does' complaint not justiciable. Appellants directly appealed to this Court on the injunctive rulings, and appellee cross-appealed from the District Court's grant of declaratory relief to Roe and Hallford.

      Not actually the law--just the syllabus