3 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2022
  2. 6291320.fs1.hubspotusercontent-na1.net 6291320.fs1.hubspotusercontent-na1.net
    1. onversation among groups ofreaders over time.

      An intriguing story of influential annotations in the history of science can be seen in Gingerich's The Book Nobody Read in which he traces annotations by teachers and students of Copernicus' De revolutionibus to show spread of knowledge in early modern astronomy.

      Gingerich, Owen. The Book Nobody Read: Chasing the Revolutions of Nicolaus Copernicus. William Heinemann, 2004.

  3. Jun 2022
    1. when Britannica conducted followup research on whether or not the books were actually being read, they found that buyers who really read the books were the exception. The two largest sub-categories among buyers who were more likely to have read the books were housewives and men trained in some sort of technical profession.

      Research by Britannica (source?) indicated that the Great Books of the Western World sold well but were not often read.

      Link to: A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking Owen Gingerich Copernicus

  4. Jun 2019
  5. mitpressonpubpub.mitpress.mit.edu mitpressonpubpub.mitpress.mit.edu
    1. That which is fit to print - be it the news, or social commentary, or religious doctrine - has for centuries been fit for annotation, too.

      Other great examples include teaching and scientific progress. Owen Gingerich details annotations in all the extant copies of Copernicus in his text The Book Nobody Read: Chasing the Revolutions of Nicolaus Copernicus. There it seemed obvious that the moving state-of-the art of science and teaching was reflected in the annotations made by professors who handed those annotations down to students who also copied them into their textbooks.