348 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2024
    1. It already Feels like I am going to war.

      Shred-mulch, or is it mulch shreds, multi-colored confetti fluttering to the ground. Spreading a blanket to feed, to enrich the soil that feeds us.

      Ouch! A rigid bit of plastic, ripping a gash in the foot of the conqueror treading the ground.

      I fear much less the war of massaging words on the page than the war to eradicate the “forever” toxins we, Homo Sapiens, have inflicted upon Mother Earth.

    1. surrounded by leafy rubbertrees and frangipanis
    2. another word which he invented but whichwas never picked up by anyone else: crinanthropy, judgement or criticism ofother people.
    3. Several of the books he wrotewere read for the Dictionary resulting in him being quoted eighteen times forlinguistic prosody terms such as acatalectic, not short of a syllable in the lastfoot; disyllabize, to make disyllabic; hypercatalectic, having an extra syllableafter the last complete dipody; and pyrrhic, a metrical foot consisting of twoshort syllables.
    4. wrote a scholarly article on the derivation of the word akimbo

      where is this article?

    5. And, of course, he was a vegetarian, a cause he embraced in middleage. Or we might say he thought he was a vegetarian; the college chef was soworried that Mayor was abstemious and getting too thin that he added meatstock to the soups that Mayor preferred to eat. Mayor was also a teetotaller.Although he didn’t foist his diet or abstention onto others, he did spread theword in his books: Modicus Cibi Medicus Sibi, or, Nature her Own Physicianin 1880, What is Vegetarianism? in 1886, and Plain Living and High Thinkingin 1897. He contributed articles to Dietetic Reformer and VegetarianMessenger, publications of the Vegetarian Society. He became President ofthe Society in 1884, a position he held until his death in 1910 when he waseighty-five – and he attributed his healthiness in later life to his diet andascetic mode of living. Over this period, Mayor had witnessed new words fortypes of vegetarians: veg (1884), fruitarian (1893), and nutarian (1909). (Theword vegan would not appear until later, in 1944.)
    6. A Professor of English at Mason College (later BirminghamUniversity), Edward Arber, kept Murray informed of new American bookswhich might provide Americanisms. He wrote to Murray on Christmas Eve1884, ‘Another book, quite a new one which I would also bring to yourattention is Bourke’s The Snake Dance of the Moquis of Arizona. It is full ofthe latest Americanisms, such as the verb “to noon” for taking the noontiderest, while a male lover is said to “whittle”, what that is, I have no idea. Is itan Americanism for connoodle? It is a most interesting book in itself andwould refresh you, if you read it yourself.’
    7. to scrinch, tosqueeze one’s body into a crouched or huddled position.
    8. gloryhole, a drawer in whichthings are heaped together without any attempt at order or tidiness;

      compare with scrap heaps or even the method of Eminem's zettelkasten (Eminem's gloryhole ???). rofl...

    9. outfangthief, a tricky entry that took Murray three people andsix letters before he nailed its definition as ‘the right of a lord of a privatejurisdiction to claim for trial a thief captured outside the jurisdiction, and tokeep any forfeited chattels on conviction’.
    10. The Cambridge jurist and legal historian (and advocatefor women’s education) Frederic Maitland helped Murray on current legalterms such as bail, defend, culprit, and deliverance, and also many obsoleteones such as couthutlaughe, a person knowingly harbouring or concealing anoutlaw; abishering, a misreading of mishersing, freedom from amercementsimposed by any court; compurgator, a character witness who swore along withthe person accused, in order to the acquittal of the latter; pennyland, landhaving the rental value of one penny; and contenement, holding, freehold.
    11. Stephen was ‘Captain of Tramps’, choosing the route, striding aheadwith his characteristic impatient snort and alpenstock in hand, and setting thetopics for conversation.

      alpenstock

  2. Jan 2024
    1. Bee-and-Flower Logic

      for - Bee and Flower Logic - subconscious unity? - uniting without consciously uniting - agreement through actions, not words

      • Identify the types of strategic congruences
      • that do not require
        • people or organizations to be or
        • think the same: “bee-and-flower logic.”
      • The bee does not consciously know it is “exchanging a service for a product” (my pollen distribution for your pollen).
      • The flower does not know it is exchanging a product for a service (my pollen for your transport).
      • However, they sustain each other despite never entering into an agreement.
      • Cosmolocalism, for example, relies on this logic,
      • as people do not need to agree on an analysis or vision to share in the fruits of the virtuous cycle.
      • Let us look for all the places this bee-and-flower logic can be enacted.
    1. The mortgage document which secures the promissory note by giving the lender an interest in the property and the right to take and sell the property—that is, foreclose—if the mortgage payments aren't made.
    1. Instance methods Instances of Models are documents. Documents have many of their own built-in instance methods. We may also define our own custom document instance methods. // define a schema const animalSchema = new Schema({ name: String, type: String }, { // Assign a function to the "methods" object of our animalSchema through schema options. // By following this approach, there is no need to create a separate TS type to define the type of the instance functions. methods: { findSimilarTypes(cb) { return mongoose.model('Animal').find({ type: this.type }, cb); } } }); // Or, assign a function to the "methods" object of our animalSchema animalSchema.methods.findSimilarTypes = function(cb) { return mongoose.model('Animal').find({ type: this.type }, cb); }; Now all of our animal instances have a findSimilarTypes method available to them. const Animal = mongoose.model('Animal', animalSchema); const dog = new Animal({ type: 'dog' }); dog.findSimilarTypes((err, dogs) => { console.log(dogs); // woof }); Overwriting a default mongoose document method may lead to unpredictable results. See this for more details. The example above uses the Schema.methods object directly to save an instance method. You can also use the Schema.method() helper as described here. Do not declare methods using ES6 arrow functions (=>). Arrow functions explicitly prevent binding this, so your method will not have access to the document and the above examples will not work.

      Certainly! Let's break down the provided code snippets:

      1. What is it and why is it used?

      In Mongoose, a schema is a blueprint for defining the structure of documents within a collection. When you define a schema, you can also attach methods to it. These methods become instance methods, meaning they are available on the individual documents (instances) created from that schema.

      Instance methods are useful for encapsulating functionality related to a specific document or model instance. They allow you to define custom behavior that can be executed on a specific document. In the given example, the findSimilarTypes method is added to instances of the Animal model, making it easy to find other animals of the same type.

      2. Syntax:

      Using methods object directly in the schema options:

      javascript const animalSchema = new Schema( { name: String, type: String }, { methods: { findSimilarTypes(cb) { return mongoose.model('Animal').find({ type: this.type }, cb); } } } );

      Using methods object directly in the schema:

      javascript animalSchema.methods.findSimilarTypes = function(cb) { return mongoose.model('Animal').find({ type: this.type }, cb); };

      Using Schema.method() helper:

      javascript animalSchema.method('findSimilarTypes', function(cb) { return mongoose.model('Animal').find({ type: this.type }, cb); });

      3. Explanation in Simple Words with Examples:

      Why it's Used:

      Imagine you have a collection of animals in your database, and you want to find other animals of the same type. Instead of writing the same logic repeatedly, you can define a method that can be called on each animal instance to find similar types. This helps in keeping your code DRY (Don't Repeat Yourself) and makes it easier to maintain.

      Example:

      ```javascript const mongoose = require('mongoose'); const { Schema } = mongoose;

      // Define a schema with a custom instance method const animalSchema = new Schema({ name: String, type: String });

      // Add a custom instance method to find similar types animalSchema.methods.findSimilarTypes = function(cb) { return mongoose.model('Animal').find({ type: this.type }, cb); };

      // Create the Animal model using the schema const Animal = mongoose.model('Animal', animalSchema);

      // Create an instance of Animal const dog = new Animal({ type: 'dog', name: 'Buddy' });

      // Use the custom method to find similar types dog.findSimilarTypes((err, similarAnimals) => { console.log(similarAnimals); }); ```

      In this example, findSimilarTypes is a custom instance method added to the Animal schema. When you create an instance of the Animal model (e.g., a dog), you can then call findSimilarTypes on that instance to find other animals with the same type. The method uses the this.type property, which refers to the type of the current animal instance. This allows you to easily reuse the logic for finding similar types across different instances of the Animal model.

      Certainly! Let's go through each part and explain it in simple terms: ### 1. `this` in Mongoose: - **What is `this`?** In JavaScript, `this` refers to the current context or object. In Mongoose, particularly within methods and middleware functions, `this` represents the instance (document) the function is currently operating on. - **Why is it used?** `this` is used to access and modify the properties of the current document. For example, in a Mongoose method, `this` allows you to refer to the fields of the specific document the method is called on. ### 2. Example: Let's use the `userSchema.pre("save", ...)`, which is a Mongoose middleware, as an example: ```javascript userSchema.pre("save", async function (next) { if (!this.isModified("password")) { next(); } else { this.password = await bcrypt.hash(this.password, 10); next(); } }); ``` - **Explanation in Simple Words:** - Imagine you have a system where users can sign up and set their password. - Before saving a new user to the database, you want to ensure that the password is securely encrypted (hashed) using a library like `bcrypt`. - The `userSchema.pre("save", ...)` is a special function that runs automatically before saving a user to the database. - In this function: - `this.isModified("password")`: Checks if the password field of the current user has been changed. - If the password is not modified, it means the user is not updating their password, so it just moves on to the next operation (saving the user). - If the password is modified, it means a new password is set or the existing one is changed. In this case, it uses `bcrypt.hash` to encrypt (hash) the password before saving it to the database. - The use of `this` here is crucial because it allows you to refer to the specific user document that's being saved. It ensures that the correct password is hashed for the current user being processed. In summary, `this` in Mongoose is a way to refer to the current document or instance, and it's commonly used to access and modify the properties of that document, especially in middleware functions like the one demonstrated here for password encryption before saving to the database.

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  3. Dec 2023
  4. Oct 2023
    1. Take Alter's treatment of the cycle of stories in which the first two matriarchs, Sarah and Rebekah, conspire against elder sons for the benefit of younger ones. Sarah insists that Abraham drive Ishmael, his firstborn, and Ishmael's mother, Hagar, into the desert to die, to protect the inheritance of Sarah's son, Isaac. Rebekah tells her son Jacob to trick his father, the now elderly Isaac, into giving him a blessing rightfully owed to Esau, Jacob's ever-so-slightly older twin brother. The matriarchs' behavior is indefensible, yet God defends it. He instructs Abraham to do as Sarah says, and after Jacob takes flight from an enraged Esau God comes to Jacob in a dream, blesses him, and tells him that he, too, like Abraham and Isaac before him, will father a great nation.Alter doesn't try to explain away the paradox of a moral God sanctioning immoral acts. Instead he lets the Bible convey the seriousness of the problem. When Abraham balks at abandoning Ishmael and Hagar, God commands, "Whatever Sarah says to you, listen to her voice." Rebekah, while instructing Jacob on how to dress like Esau so as to steal his blessing, echoes God's phrase -- listen to my voice" -- not once but twice in an effort to reassure him. As we read on in Alter's translation, we realize that the word "voice" ("kol" in Hebrew) is one of his "key words," that if we could only manage to keep track of all the ways it is used it would unlock new worlds of meaning. In the story of Hagar and Ishmael, God's messenger will tell Hagar that God will save them because he has heard the voice of the crying boy. And the all but blind Isaac will recognize the sound of Jacob's voice, so that although his younger son stands before him with his arms covered in goatskin (to make them as hairy as Esau's), and has even put on his brother's clothes (to smell more like a hunter), Isaac nearly grasps the deceit being perpetrated against him.

      Something fascinating here with respect to orality and associative memory in ancient texts at the border of literacy.

      What do others have to say about the use of "key words" with respect to storytelling and orality with respect to associative memory.

      The highlighted portion is an interesting example.

      What do other examples look like? How common might they be? What ought we call them?

    2. Alter's translation puts into practice his belief that the rules of biblical style require it to reiterate, artfully, within scenes and from scene to scene, a set of "key words," a term Alter derives from Buber and Franz Rosenzweig, who in an epic labor that took nearly 40 years to complete, rendered the Hebrew Bible into a beautifully Hebraicized German. Key words, as Alter has explained elsewhere, clue the reader in to what's at stake in a particular story, serving either as "the chief means of thematic exposition" within episodes or as connective tissue between them.
    1. the idea of such an absurd song in a very serious setting just seemed so funny to me passionate choristers interpretive dance string quartet bowing away all taking itself very seriously and then the song is about shia labeouf being a cannibal i found out recently that's called bathos serious and absurd juxtaposed (00:09:49)

      Dictionary definition:

      (especially in a work of literature) an effect of anticlimax created by an unintentional lapse in mood from the sublime to the trivial or ridiculous.

    1. The main usage difference is that dependency can be used in a second sense as a "concrete" noun to mean a person or thing which depends on something/someone else. But note that in the programming context it's not uncommon to see it used to mean a software resource upon which some piece of software depends (i.e. - reversing the need/provide relationship).

      Is that really true? Can dependency refer to a person or thing which depends on something/someone else?? I'm only used to it the other way.

    2. And as others have pointed out, there is potential for ambiguity: if A is dependent on B, then a dependence or dependency (relationship) exists; but referring to either A or B as the dependency demands context.

      "demands context" :)

  5. Sep 2023
    1. the ability to do so is associated with recognizing the facts of “no self” as discussed in the opening of this section. Accepting the Bodhisattva vow brings in this way the possibility of expanding intelligence in a steady fashion—free from hesitation, disappointment, fear, and other such factors that can now be seen to arise from misperceptions of the nature of the project.
      • for: self construct - misperceptions
      • in other words
        • if the self is no longer strongly reified, but experienced nakedly as a construction, then the misperceptions that are tethered to the solidification of self cannot survive, namely:
          • hesitation
          • fear
          • disappointment
          • attachment
          • etc...
    2. Many definitions of intelligence and cognitive capacity have been debated over the centuries [28]. The problem with most existing formalisms is that they are closely tied to a specific type of subject
      • for: common denominators, in other words - common denominators

      • in other words

        • there is a need to find a common denominator of intelligence and cognition amongst this great diversity
    1. what this is supposed to be what this is supposed to be is um a framework that moves these kind of 00:15:43 questions questions of uh cognition of sentience of uh of of um intelligence and so on from the area of philosophy where people have a lot of philosophical feelings and preconceptions about what things can do 00:15:56 and what things can't do and it really uh really stresses the idea that you you can't just have feelings about this stuff you have to make testable claims
      • in other words
        • a meta transformation from philosophy to science
    1. In 1807, he started writing a dictionary, which he called, boldly, An American Dictionary of the English Language. He wanted it to be comprehensive, authoritative. Think of that: a man sits down, aiming to capture his language whole.

      Johnson's dictionary is much like this article describes too.

      Perhaps we need more dictionaries with singular voices rather than dictionaries made by committee?

    2. John McPhee — one the great American writers of nonfiction, almost peerless as a prose stylist — once wrote an essay for the New Yorker about his process called “Draft #4.” He explains that for him, draft #4 is the draft after the painstaking labor of creation is done, when all that’s left is to punch up the language, to replace shopworn words and phrases with stuff that sings.

      I quite like the idea of this Draft #4 concept.

  6. Aug 2023
    1. The lib-eral artist learns to read, write, speak, listen, understand, andthink.

      Uncommon use of "liberal artist" as one who uses or practices the liberal arts.

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    1. I find the use of the term “session” within integration tests a bit unfortunate (open_session, etc), since there are also these session objects, which are however different. Maybe replace by “user_session” ?
    1. "in his youth he was full of vim and vigor"

      vim<br /> 2023 definition: energy; enthusiasm

      vim is rarely ever seen outside of the context of the phrase "vim and vigor" and seems to be a calcified word within this phrase.

      vigor<br /> 2023 definition: physical strength and good health

    2. "in his youth he was full of vim and vigor"

      Do calcified words eventually cease to have any definition over time? That is they have a stand alone definition, then a definition within their calcified phrase, then they cease to have any stand alone definition at all though they continue existence only in those calcified phrases.

    1. Retrenchment is a term that describes the situation when tenure-track or tenured faculty are let go because their positions have been eliminated.
  7. Jul 2023
    1. Had Russell gone to Crimea with an avowed aversion to battle and aprofound sense that the whole fight was morally wrong and shouldbe brought to an immediate halt, one might fault him and declare himto be a Victorian example of modern advocacy journalism
    2. He left in high dudgeon for Europe and a succession of what heconsidered more nobly fought continental battles, mainly involvingthe Prussians.

      dudgeon<br /> noun; plural noun: dudgeons<br /> a feeling of offense or deep resentment.

    1. Dostoyevsky’s detractors have faulted him for erratic, even sloppy, prose and what Nabokov, the most famous of the un-fans, calls his “gothic rodomontade.”
    2. One day, when Richard was reading “Karamazov” (in a translation by one of Garnett’s epigones, David Magarshak), Larissa, who had read the book many times in the original, began peeking over her husband’s shoulder to read along with him.

      epigones is a lovely little word...

  8. Jun 2023
    1. What were the lineaments offormality or informality?

      lineaments, what a great and infrequently used word.

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  9. May 2023
    1. He will give us “all things.”

      That's sound logic, but there's no evidence of an actual God actually giving "all things" to any people, let alone his followers.

      Notice how Dr. Piper realizes he needs to qualify this promise, in the next paragraphs, by explaining that "all things" doesn't really mean all things!

    2. If you don’t have the resources to do it, he doesn’t expect you to do it.

      This is a very common cop-out, throughout the Bible. A grand promise is made, and then an all-encompassing excuse is tacked on to explain that anytime the promise is unmet, it means the promise doesn't apply.

  10. Feb 2023
  11. Jan 2023
    1. a common technique in natural language processing is to operationalize certain semantic concepts (e.g., "synonym") in terms of syntactic structure (two words that tend to occur nearby in a sentence are more likely to be synonyms, etc). This is what word2vec does.

      Can I use some of these sorts of methods with respect to corpus linguistics over time to better identified calcified words or archaic phrases that stick with the language, but are heavily limited to narrower(ing) contexts?

  12. Dec 2022
    1. nalyze the content of 69,907 headlines pro-duced by four major global media corporations duringa minimum of eight consecutive months in 2014. In or-der to discover strategies that could be used to attractclicks, we extracted features from the text of the newsheadlines related to the sentiment polarity of the head-line. We discovered that the sentiment of the headline isstrongly related to the popularity of the news and alsowith the dynamics of the posted comments on that par-ticular news
    1. Noam Chomsky and Andrea Moro on the Limits of Our ComprehensionAn excerpt from Chomsky and Moro’s new book “The Secrets of Words.”

      !- book title : The Secrets of Words" - authors : Moro and Chomsky

  13. Nov 2022
    1. With the benefit of hindsight, our analysis would have been much easierif the case studies had greater structure and used standardized definitions. Giventhat the case studies spanned a 20-year period, organization names have changed inthat time and keyword searches were not sophisticated enough to capture some keyinformation.

      I found similar in my 2017 work. I'd guess that modern vector-based analyses and entity linking approaches could help a lot with reconciling these issues now.

    1. “Broadly speaking, the shortwords are the best, and the old wordswhen short are best of all,” attestedformer British Prime Minister WinstonChurchill,
    2. “Usethe smallest word that does the job,”advised essayist and journalist E. B.White.20
    3. “[T]here is always a short word for it,”Rogers said. “‘I love words but I don’tlike strange ones. You don’t under-stand them, and they don’t understandyou. Old words is like old friends– you know ‘em the minute you see‘em.”17

      17 betty roGerS, wiLL roGerS 294 (1941; new ed. 1979) (quoting Rogers).

    4. Justice Felix Frankfurter,a prolific writer as a Harvard lawprofessor before joining the SupremeCourt, was right that “[a]nything thatis written may present a problem ofmeaning” because words “seldomattain[] more than approximate preci-sion.”12

      12 Felix Frankfurter, Some Reflections On the Reading of Statutes, 47 CoLUm . L. rev. 527, 528 (1947), reprinting Felix Frankfurter, Sixth Annual Benjamin N. Cardozo Lecture, 2 Rec. Bar Ass'n City of N.Y. (No. 6, 1947).

    5. Guy de Maupassant, was no lawyer,but his advice can help guide lawyerswho seek precision in their writing.“Whatever you want to say,” he assert-ed, “there is only one word to expressit, only one verb to give it movement,only one adjective to qualify it. Youmust search for that word, that verb,that adjective, and never be contentwith an approximation, never resortto tricks, even clever ones, and neverhave recourse to verbal sleight-of-hand to avoid a difficulty.”11

      11 Guy de Maupassant, Selected Short Sto- ries 10-11 (Roger Colet ed., 1971) (Maupassant quoting French writer Gustave Flaubert).

  14. Oct 2022
    1. Writing4ever_3

      Even if your raw typing is 60+ wpm, it doesn't help if you're actively composing at the same time. If the words and ideas come to you at that speed and you can get it out, great, but otherwise focus on what you can do in 15 minute increments to get the ideas onto the page. If typing is holding you back, write by hand or try a tape recorder or voice to text software.

  15. Sep 2022
    1. However, while URLs allow you to locate a resource, a URI simply identifies a resource. This means that a URI is not necessarily intended as an address to get a resource. It is meant just as an identifier.

      However, while URLs allow you to locate a resource, a URI simply identifies a resource.

      Very untrue/misleading! It doesn't simply (only) identify it. It includes URLs, so a URI may be a locator, a name, or both!

      https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/html/rfc3986 states it better and perfectly:

      A URI can be further classified as a locator, a name, or both. The term "Uniform Resource Locator" (URL) refers to the subset of URIs that, in addition to identifying a resource, provide a means of locating the resource by describing its primary access mechanism (e.g., its network "location").

      This means that a URI is not necessarily intended as an address to get a resource. It is meant just as an identifier.

      The "is not necessarily" part is correct. The "is meant" part is incorrect; shoudl be "may only be meant as".

  16. Aug 2022
    1. from Latin<br /> prefix in- meaing "toward"; <br /> with<br /> index, indic- "forefinger, informer, sign"<br /> dicere "to say";<br /> dicare "to make known"

      late Middle English: from Latin index, indic- ‘forefinger, informer, sign’, from in- ‘towards’ + a second element related to dicere ‘say’ or dicare ‘make known’; compare with indicate. The original sense ‘index finger’ (with which one points), came to mean ‘pointer’ (late 16th century), and figuratively something that serves to point to a fact or conclusion; hence a list of topics in a book (‘pointing’ to their location).

      Use over time<br />

  17. Jul 2022
    1. Dagger anatomy, for the quiz: the quillon is the guard that separates the hilt of a knife from its blade, and the choil is the notch where the blade meets the quillon.

      the guard that separates the hilt of a knife or dagger from its blade ::: quillon

      the notch where the blade of a knife meets the quillon ::: choil

  18. Jun 2022
    1. Intermediate Packets

      example of the creation of a buzz word for something not really quite necessary. It's useful to give names to things, but this is just a synonym for a note, isn't it?

      definitely not as developed as "second brain"

  19. May 2022
    1. "I didn't fully understand it at the time, but throughout my time as a freshman at Boston College I've realized that I have the power to alter myself for the better and broaden my perspective on life. For most of my high school experience, I was holding to antiquated thoughts that had an impact on the majority of my daily interactions. Throughout my life, growing up as a single child has affected the way am in social interactions. This was evident in high school class discussions, as I did not yet have the confidence to be talkative and participate even up until the spring term of my senior year."

    1. : low land that is covered wholly or partly with water unless artificially drained and that usually has peaty alkaline soil and characteristic flora (as of sedges and reeds)

      fen

      often heard in the phrase forests and fens

  20. Apr 2022
  21. Mar 2022
    1. gesture isimpressionistic and holistic, conveying an immediate sense of how things lookand feel and move.

      Gestures provide a powerful and immediate sense of how things look, feel, and move and provide facilities that can't be matched by spoken communication.


      Link this to the idea of dance being used in oral cultures to communicate the movement of animals, particularly in preparation for hunting. cross reference: Songlines and Knowledge and Power by Lynne Kelly

      Link to [[a picture is worth a thousand words]]

  22. Feb 2022
    1. Circle words you’re not familiar with, look them up, and write their definitions in the margins beside them. Consider creating on a blank page in the book’s front or back matter a running glossary complete with the page numbers where the new words can be found in context.

      Keeping a glossary of new/interesting words in the endpapers of a book (or other notebook) is a useful practice and somewhat similar to the glossary of ideas which is also a useful practice.


      Link to Mortimer J. Adler who recommends keeping outlines of ideas on endpapers. Specific page reference?

    1. colleagues

      a person with whom one works in a profession or business

    2. inflammatory

      relating to or causing inflammation of a part of the body.

    3. But

      it means what distinguishes Copeland’s work is the long consequence of this effect, which extended from childhood into young adulthoo.

    4. such as

      trouble and cancer it means that risk of chronic diseases such as heart trouble andante cancer.

    1. We need to getour thoughts on paper first and improve them there, where we canlook at them. Especially complex ideas are difficult to turn into alinear text in the head alone. If we try to please the critical readerinstantly, our workflow would come to a standstill. We tend to callextremely slow writers, who always try to write as if for print,perfectionists. Even though it sounds like praise for extremeprofessionalism, it is not: A real professional would wait until it wastime for proofreading, so he or she can focus on one thing at a time.While proofreading requires more focused attention, finding the rightwords during writing requires much more floating attention.

      Proofreading while rewriting, structuring, or doing the thinking or creative parts of writing is a form of bikeshedding. It is easy to focus on the small and picayune fixes when writing, but this distracts from the more important parts of the work which really need one's attention to be successful.

      Get your ideas down on paper and only afterwards work on proofreading at the end. Switching contexts from thinking and creativity to spelling, small bits of grammar, and typography can be taxing from the perspective of trying to multi-task.


      Link: Draft #4 and using Webster's 1913 dictionary for choosing better words/verbiage as a discrete step within the rewrite.


      Linked to above: Are there other dictionaries, thesauruses, books of quotations, or individual commonplace books, waste books that can serve as resources for finding better words, phrases, or phrasing when writing? Imagine searching through Thoreau's commonplace book for finding interesting turns of phrase. Naturally searching through one's own commonplace book is a great place to start, if you're saving those sorts of things, especially from fiction.

      Link this to Robin Sloan's AI talk and using artificial intelligence and corpuses of literature to generate writing.

  23. Jan 2022
    1. A lagniappe (/ˈlænjæp/ LAN-yap, /lænˈjæp/ lan-YAP) is "a small gift given to a customer by a merchant at the time of a purchase" (such as a 13th doughnut on purchase of a dozen), or more broadly, "something given or obtained gratuitously or by way of good measure."[2] It can be used more generally as meaning any extra or unexpected benefit.
    1. 20 years in, blogging is still a curious mix of both technical, literary and graphic bodgery, with each day's work demanding the kind of technical minutuae we were told would disappear with WYSIWYG desktop publishing.

      bodgery

    1. The phrase “gardyloo” was shouted in medieval times to warn those below that toilet waste was about to be thrown out of the window. I learned the phrase at school, and have periodically told others of it since. I had always assumed it was used UK-wide, but apparently it was only used in Scotland. I wonder what they said in England. Or maybe they didn’t say anything on warn those below before throwing their toilet waste out of the window. (And yes, the English also threw toilet waste out I the window in medieval times.) While I’m here, I learned a few weeks back that “squint” in England only means to narrow one’s eyes, whereas in Scotland it can also mean wonky or askew, so all the times in England I’ve said something like “the picture’s a bit squint”, the English won’t have understood what I meant.

      A early cousin to the "shit hitting the fan".

    1. In ancient Greek, noēma means “thinking” or the “object of thought.” And that is our intention: to delve deeply into the critical issues transforming the world today, at length and with historical context, in order to illuminate new pathways of thought in a way not possible through the immediacy of daily media.

      What a great title for an online publication.

  24. Dec 2021
    1. Geertz 2001. Academics are very prone to a phenomenoncalled ‘schismogenesis’, which we will be exploring at variouspoints in this book.

      schismogenesis - a portmanteau word comprised of schism and genesis and meant to describe the beginnings of arguments which divide people or ideas from each other.

      G&W use the controversy of anthropologist Napoleon Chagnon from the 1970s and his work with the Yanomami peoples of southern Venezuela and northern Brazil as an example of this.

    1. “Liberal” just means free and disinterested. It means that inquiry is pursued without fear or favor, regardless of the outcome and whatever the field of study.

      Definition of a "liberal education"

    1. Catachresis in rhetoric is a failed transfer, a juxtaposition of incon-gruous elements.

      catachresis : the use of a word in a way that is not correct, for example, the use of mitigate for militate.

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  25. Nov 2021
    1. On the other hand, paremiologists seldom specify "definitions"-much less ori- gins-of proverbial expressions that they collect, for the simple reason that so little can be known with certainty.

      Paremiology (from Greek παροιμία (paroimía) 'proverb, maxim, saw') is the collection and study of proverbs.

      Paremiography is the collection of proverbs.

    1. I am, by calling, a dealer in words; and words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind. Not only do words infect, ergotise, narcotise, and paralyse, but they enter into and colour the minutest cells of the brain, very much as madder mixed with a stag’s food at the Zoo colours the growth of the animal’s antlers.

      [...] words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind.<br/> —Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) in "Surgeons and the Soul" address at the annual dinner of the Royal College of Surgeons, London, February 14, 1923.

      See Also

    1. Partisans, especially on the right, now toss around the phrase cancel culture when they want to defend themselves from criticism, however legitimate.

      A solid definition of cancel culture.

  26. Oct 2021
    1. We refuse to overload it, to cumber the mind; we prefer liberty of soul to a wealth of unusable ideas.

      word: cumber I've seen this word a few times in the last couple of days, which is odd as it's relatively rare and a bit dated.

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  27. Sep 2021
    1. Generally, shrank is the simple past tense form of "shrink" like in "I shrank the shirt in the wash." Shrunk is the past participle being paired with "have" as in "I have shrunk the jeans." There are rarer examples of shrinked and shrunken in literature but not enough to support those usages as standard.
    1. When referring to a change in direction, position, or course of action, the correct phrase is to change tack. This is in reference to the nautical use of tack which refers to the direction of a boat with respect to sail position. This phrase has long been confused as "change tact" but this is technically incorrect.
  28. Aug 2021
    1. The figures are relatively flattened, and in the case of the Virgin Mary and Gabriel, placed against a diapered ground (a traditional, flat patterned background).

      diaper: decorate (a surface) with a repeating geometric or floral pattern.

      I've not come across this usage before.

    1. When writing about programming, I prefer to use 'annotation' as the general term. Although .NET was first, the word 'attribute' is just too widely used for different things.
    1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypomnema

      Hypomnema (Greek. ὑπόμνημα, plural ὑπομνήματα, hypomnemata), also spelled hupomnema, is a Greek word with several translations into English including a reminder, a note, a public record, a commentary, an anecdotal record, a draft, a copy, and other variations on those terms.

      Compare and contrast the idea of this with the concept of the commonplace book. There's also a tie in with the idea of memory, particularly for meditation.

      There's also the idea here of keeping a note of something to be fixed or remedied and which needs follow up or reflection.

  29. Jul 2021
    1. One constant is that, to achieve all the purposes of read­ing, the desideratum must be the ability to read different things at different-appropriate-speeds, not everything at the greatest possible speed.

      desideratum

    1. Doxography (Greek: δόξα – "an opinion", "a point of view" + γράφειν – "to write", "to describe") is a term used especially for the works of classical historians, describing the points of view of past philosophers and scientists. The term was coined by the German classical scholar Hermann Alexander Diels.

      doxography

    1. Perhaps a better way of understanding what Anaximander has to say is to study carefully the doxography, which goes back to people like Aristotle and Theophrastus, who probably have had Anaximander’s book before their eyes, and who tried to reformulate what they thought were its central claims.

      doxography

      Much like attempting to reconstruct history from portions of the Bible, one must consider the context of the pieces in its own time and with the context of the authors' time, space, and other thought.

    2. Therefore, we offer a translation, in which some poetic features of the original, such as chiasmus and alliteration have been imitated:

      chiasmus

    3. The important thing is, however, that he did not just utter apodictic statements, but also tried to give arguments. This is what makes him the first philosopher.

      apoditic

    1. Though my relationship to time fluctuates, the gravamen of my disclosures remains constant.

      gravamen

    1. Hesse described each imagined Life as an “entelechy,” that is, the realization of a potential—but perhaps that assumes something like the pre-existence of souls, an Identity that somehow exists before it is embodied in, realized in, a particular culture, a particular gender, a particular ethnicity.

      :en·tel·e·chy /ənˈteləkē/ noun [PHILOSOPHY]

      ; the realization of potential.

      • the supposed vital principle that guides the development and functioning of an organism or other system or organization. plural noun: entelechies

      "such self-organization required a special biological force—entelechy"

      • the soul.
    1. 23-24) Latin epulis does not = “grand salons,” and Lucretius’ language is not recherché enough to warrant “gewgaws” and “garnitures.”

      I quite like the portmanteau garniture.

      [[recherché]]

    1. And even long-term, canonical sources such as books and scholarly journals are in fugacious configurations—usually to support digital subscription models that require scarcity—that preclude ready long-term linking, even as their physical counterparts evaporate.

      [[fugacious]] what a great word not often seen in adjectival form.

    1. Either you have a spare computer on hand or spin up a VPS and have the technical nous to run a Gemini server on it, or you find somebody running a site like Flounder, or a tilde, and ask them very nicely if they’ll give you some space to upload to.

      I love the word nous. It's definitely underused.

    1. Von der Bücherordnung zur Buchführung

      From book keeping to bookkeeping

      Interesting to note that the German has two different physical words for these concepts which are more similar in English: keeping books (librarianship) to bookkeeping (accounting)

    1. The relationship between Phillips — one of whose most famous works is A Humument, an ongoing-for-decades collage/manipulation/adaptation of a Victorian book — and Eno is a fascinating one in the history of aleatory or, as I prefer, emergent art.

      Humument sounds interesting, particularly the descriptions of collage/manipulation

      aleatory is a great word that one sees infrequently and all too randomly

  30. Jun 2021
    1. When dealing with the verb, the issue of how to treat the past participle is a contentious one, with much blood being shed on both sides. Some people feel that the past participle of input should be input, not inputted, based on the reasoning that the word comes from put, and we don’t say “he putted the papers on the shelf.” A similar line of reasoning has caused many people to aver that words such as broadcast should never be written as broadcasted, since the cast portion of the word remains unchanged with tense.
    1. They also have a sound

      I recently learned about ticker-tape synesthesia. My sister has it. In addition to "closed captioning for life", many folks with it see the words they read in their heads as they read them (leading to a doubling of the words). It's made me think about the process of reading in a whole new way...

    1. I completely understand that master have two meanings: A man who has people working for him, especially servants or slaves; and An original recording, film, or document from which copies can be made.
    2. I think it's just a bad English/mis-translation problem. I'm guessing @pmmmwh assumed 'master' meant like 主 in 奴隸主 (slave owner/master). Actually a better translation would be 師 like 功夫大師 (Kung Fu master). The specimen copies are made from.
    3. The specimen copies are made from.
    1. I basically destroyed my favorite books with the pure logorrheic force of my excitement, spraying them so densely with scribbled insight that the markings almost ceased to have meaning.

      logorrheic force is a great phrase

    1. When the Net absorbs a medium, that medium is re-created in the Net’s image. It injects the medium’s content with hyperlinks, blinking ads, and other digital gewgaws, and it surrounds the content with the content of all the other media it has absorbed.

      Curious use of the nearly archaic word gewgaws here. Definitely harkens back to a technophobic time where physical machinery was the terrifying new thing. Is it admitting a bit of a Luddic stance?

    1. You draw a box not only around any word that does not seem quite right but also around words that fulfill their as-signment but seem to present an op-. A portunity.

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  31. May 2021