141 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Feb 2024
    1. And, of course, he was a vegetarian, a cause he embraced in middleage. Or we might say he thought he was a vegetarian; the college chef was soworried that Mayor was abstemious and getting too thin that he added meatstock to the soups that Mayor preferred to eat. Mayor was also a teetotaller.Although he didn’t foist his diet or abstention onto others, he did spread theword in his books: Modicus Cibi Medicus Sibi, or, Nature her Own Physicianin 1880, What is Vegetarianism? in 1886, and Plain Living and High Thinkingin 1897. He contributed articles to Dietetic Reformer and VegetarianMessenger, publications of the Vegetarian Society. He became President ofthe Society in 1884, a position he held until his death in 1910 when he waseighty-five – and he attributed his healthiness in later life to his diet andascetic mode of living. Over this period, Mayor had witnessed new words fortypes of vegetarians: veg (1884), fruitarian (1893), and nutarian (1909). (Theword vegan would not appear until later, in 1944.)
  3. Jan 2024
    1. What is more lacking, however, are approaches to transformation that can be applied in and adapted to multiple (and necessarily unique) contexts

      for - key insight - movement of movements - What's missing - transformation catalyst - indyweb / Indranet

      • What is more lacking, however,
      • are approaches to transformation
      • that can be applied in and adapted to
      • multiple (and necessarily unique) contexts
      • to provide a framework for building such action strategies.
      • Here I would introduce the concepts of transformation catalysts
      • who build effective, purposeful transformation systems
      • using three general processes of
        • connecting,
        • cohering, and
        • amplifying.
    2. Doing that requires new approaches to organizing for transformation where multiple initiatives connect, cohere, and amplify their individual and collective transformative action

      for - key insight - global movement requirements - new organising system - indyweb /Indranet - people-centered - interpersonal - individual collective gestalt - a foundational idea of indyweb / Indranet epistemology - Deep Humanity - epistemological foundation of indyweb / Indranet

      • The world cannot wait
      • for us to learn or know everything that we need to know
      • for bringing about purposeful system change
      • towards desired and broadly shared aspirations
      • for a more
        • equitable,
        • just, and
        • ecologically flourishing
      • world.
      • The key question before us is
        • how to become transformation catalysts
        • that work with numerous associated
          • initiatives and
          • leaders
        • to form
          • purposeful and
          • action-oriented
        • transformation systems
        • that build on the collective strength inherent
        • in the many networks already working towards transformation.
      • Doing that requires new approaches
      • to organizing for transformation
      • where multiple initiatives
        • connect,
        • cohere, and
        • amplify
      • their
        • individual and
        • collective
      • transformative actions

      Comment - indyweb / Indranet is ideally suited for this - seeing the mention of individual and collective in a sentence surfaced the new Deep Humanity concept of individual collective gestalt that is intrinsic to the epistemological foundation of the Indyweb / Indranet - This is reflected in the words to describe the Indyweb / Indranet as people-centered and interpersonal

    1. How do we support the emergence of a powerful GCM that expresses strategic and relational congruences (of analysis and action) within a GCM where diversity (ontological and epistemological) is inherent?

      for - question - uniting amongst diversity - GCM - global citizens movement

      • How do we support the emergence of a powerful GCM
      • that expresses
        • strategic and
        • relational congruences (of - analysis and - action)
      • within a GCM where diversity (
      • ontological and
      • epistemological)
      • is inherent?

      Comment - Deep Humanity, with Common Human Denominators could be proposed as a unifying framework

    1. Promoting coffee as an alternative to alcohol was a tactic of the temperance movement that had begun to take hold here in the early 1800s, and by the end of the century it looked as if it might actually be working. Certainly, it was more subtle than some attempts to curb drunkenness – in Islandmagee, for example, local landowner Lord Dungannon had dealt with “the appalling number of sudden, violent and premature deaths, solely from the effects of intemperance” by the simple act of smashing up all 14 pubs on the peninsula

      Replacing coffee with alcohol was a way to combat intemperance (Temperance movement)

  4. Dec 2023
    1. I think government is uh can be and it a Force for good and many of the problems we Face are what social 01:04:07 scientists would call common good or Collective action problems and actually require coordination from government to be addressed so there is a a political philosophy of 01:04:20 course that is increasingly strong in the United States the government is not good for anything
      • for: adjacency - collective action - government - libertarianism - open source movement - commons movement

      • adjacency between

        • collective action
        • government
        • commons movement
        • comminutism
        • libertarianism
      • adjacency statement
        • government could be important agent of collective action, except when they are stuck due to competing ideology, especially libertarian views
        • the briefing commons movement of an alternative collection action approach that can compliment government
  5. Nov 2023
  6. Oct 2023
      • for: climate science - for policymakers, climate science - for citizens, leverage point, leverage point - climate science, missed opportunity - citizen movement

      • comment

        • has anyone thought about the idea of writing a science report - FOR THE CITIZEN? It seems that there is a potentially large missed opportunity by NOT seriously engaging the public with climate science and thinking that the policymakers are the only ones who can make the system change.
        • question
          • what if
            • climate science reports and studies can ALSO be written for THE GENERAL PUBLIC?
    1. We currently have a climate movement and a biodiversity movement. These are for the most part, two separate movements. As our understandings grow and spread of how important biodiversity is to climate, these two movements can merge and synergize.
      • for: key insight, climate movement, biodiversity movement, adjacency, adjacency - climate movement - biodiversity movement

      • key insight

        • We currently have
          • a climate movement and
          • a biodiversity movement.
        • These are for the most part, two separate movements.
        • As our understandings grow and spread of how important biodiversity is to climate,
          • these two movements can merge and synergize.
    1. West is by far the most unequivocal in his denunciation of the Democratic and Republican parties as dominated by big money and corporate wealth. He is no less emphatic in his condemnation of Israeli occupation and domination of Palestinians, and in his condemnation of the militarization of American foreign policy. Democratic leaders seem to fear that he might siphon off just enough black and leftist votes from Biden to give Trump a winning margin.
  7. Sep 2023
    1. we we are made of of a kind of nesting doll architecture not just structurally I mean that part's obvious that each thing is made of smaller things but in fact 00:01:58 that each of these layers has their own problem-solving capacity uh in many cases various kinds of ability to learn from experience and and uh the the 00:02:10 competencies of various kinds and this turns out to be very important
      • for: superorganism, social superorganism, bottom-up movement,

      • comment

        • this model of nested structures and the major evolutionary transition of individuality suggests a metaphor for the great transition of civilization:
          • apply SIMPOL to fragmented change agents around the globe and apply leverage points, idling resources and social tipping points to organize individuals at one scale to create a MET of individuality at another higher scale
          • this becomes the construction / evolution of a new individual
            • the social superorganism for rapid whole sysem change
  8. Aug 2023
    1. Aktivist:innen von Ende Gelände haben in Brunsbüttel in Deutschland eine Baustelle für eine LNG-Pipeline besetzt, die von einem Aktivisten als „Tatort der Klimakatastrophe“ bezeichnet wird. Die taz berichtet in einem Schwerpunkt über Ende Gelände. https://taz.de/Blockade-auf-Baustelle-fuer-LNG-Leitung/!5950908/

    1. The primary means of social and civic innovation will occur as people go offline and reconnect with their local communities. So, I don’t see so much positive change occurring from the top down, through policies and regulation – even though it would be nice to try. I do think government and corporations can be pressured to respond to widespread, bottom-up social activism and widespread changes in citizen and consumer behavior.
      • for: quote, quote - Douglas Rushkoff, quote - bottom-up, bottom-up action
      • quote
        • The primary means of social and civic innovation will occur as people go offline and reconnect with their local communities.
        • So, I don’t see so much positive change occurring from the top down,
          • through policies and
          • regulation
        • even though it would be nice to try.
        • I do think government and corporations can be pressured to respond to widespread,
          • bottom-up social activism and
          • changes in citizen and consumer behavior.
      • author: Douglas Rushkoff
        • media theorist
        • author
        • professor of media, City University of New York
    1. aybe that's the most 00:06:49 important thing um where uh would just citizen science or participatory science dialogue with really uh inclusive participation play a role in the r d 00:07:05 programs of the future in what you're kind of thinking about yeah so so um i i i framed this this r d program that is it's conceptual at the 00:07:18 time it's not funded yet you know i'm hoping that we can secure funds but i frame it as a partnership between this global science community and local communities 00:07:29 so it's very so dialogue with the public and within the science community and among interested stakeholders is extremely important
      • for: earth system boundaries, cosmolocal, local movement, transition town, circular cities, TPF
      • comment
        • integrating science with local communities
        • this statement is key, to bring extra capacity to communities that are handicapped and don't have scientific, technological and engineering capacity -paraphrase
      • This project is a collaboration between the global scientific community and local communities to improve societal systems. It's not a one-size-fits-all process, but many different experiments.
      • TPF and SRG strategy is well aligned with Science-driven societal transformation ethos:
  9. Jul 2023
    1. Civil society is the sector where the power of We thePeople ultimately and properly resides.
      • for: collective action, bottom-up, bottom-up movement, M2W, individual/collective
      • Civil society is the sector where the power of We the People ultimately and properly resides.
      • Consequently, in the fully functioning Ecological Civilization,
        • government and business sectors must be
        • creations of and
        • accountable to
        • a civil society of people who embrace
          • the rights and
          • responsibilities
        • of their citizenship at all system levels from - the local to - the global.
      • We can be citizens of only one locality.
        • But we are all citizens of Earth—and the many levels in between.
      • This must be acknowledged by any truly democratic system of self-governance.
    1. The second great separation followed the industrial revolution.
      • Second great separation
        • Industrial Revolution
          • The early enclosure movement during the 1600s
          • Prior to the enclosures, land was held in common for public use, not owned by individuals.
          • The rise of capitalism also occurred during this time.
            • Adam Smith wrote his landmark book, The Wealth of Nations, in 1776.
            • Land was privatized so the most efficient use of land could be determined
              • by market competition rather than
              • community consensus.
            • Labor then also had to be ​“commodified,” or bought and sold,
              • so non-farmers could work for wages and buy food and the other necessities of life they had been getting from the land.
            • With reliance on working for wages, buying, and selling
              • the necessity for personal relationships were diminished.
            • With the diminished necessity for personal relationships,
              • the social cohesion within families, communities and society began to diminish as well.
          • The persistence of chronic poverty and malnutrition, even during times of tremendous economic growth and individual wealth, are direct consequences of a growing sense of disconnectedness from each other that was nourished by the industrial era of economic development.
  10. Jun 2023
    1. The common aim of lawmakers is to achieve effective legislative texts, namely tests that with the synergy of the other actors in the legislative pro‐ cess can produce the desired regulatory results. However, the process for achieving this common goal is not identical. Broadly speaking, civil and common law countries differ in their approaches.

      Plain Language Movement: Common law and civil law differ in their approaches.

  11. Apr 2023
    1. I just watched the documentary Aby Warburg: Metamorphosis and Memory (Wechsler, 2016) via Kanopy (for free using my local library's gateway) and thought that others here interested in the ideas of memory in culture, history, and art history may appreciate it. While a broad biography of a seminal figure in the development of art history in the early 20th century, there are some interesting bits relating to art and memory as well as a mention of Frances A. Yates whose research on memory was influenced by Warburg's library.

      Also of "note" is the fact that Aby Warburg had a significant zettelkasten-based note taking practice and portions of his collection (both written as well as images) are featured within the hour long documentary.

      Researchers interested in images, art, dance, and gesture as they relate to memory may appreciate this short film as an entrance into some of Aby Warburg's more specialized research which includes some cultural anthropology research into American Hopi indigenous peoples. cc: @LynneKelly

      syndication link

    1. Recommended Resource

      I recommend adding the webpage "Open Access in Australia" on Wikiwand that documents Australia's history for accepting and promoting open access and open publication in its country.

      The site contains a timeline that documents key years in which the open movement, open access, open government, and open data concepts were introduced. The year that CC Australia was established is included in the timeline.

    1. **Recommend Resource: ** Under the "More Information About Other Open Movements" I recommended adding Higashinihon Daishinsai Shashin Hozon Purojekuto, (trans. Great Earthquake of Eastern Japan Photo Archiving Project) which is one of Japan's open government and open data efforts to document all photographs about Japan's 2011 earthquake.

      The site currently contains close to 40,000 photographs of the aftermath of the natural disaster.

      The photos are hosted by Yahoo! Japan and are published under non-commercial clause for open access to the public.

  12. Mar 2023
    1. Despite attempts such as the HistoryWorkshop movement in Great Britain, Scandinavia, and Germany to break out ofthe narrow confines of the historical discipline and to encourage the writing ofhistories of and by common people, new fields of history, such as women’s andgender studies, are centered mostly at universities and follow established careerlines.
  13. Feb 2023
    1. if you're exposed to a scene depicting two people different slightly in level of attractiveness or don't even if they differ not at all 00:13:32 and we measure eye movements then the more eye movements people that that we can find on a certain object it's not only true for faces also other objects but in phases particularly 00:13:44 and here you see the more red the more eye movements landed in the face of in this case a white person and this is a clear indicator that this person here found more beauty in the right than in the left face and that's very reliable
      • if you're exposed to a scene depicting two people
      • different slightly in level of attractiveness or don't even if they differ not at all -and we measure eye movements
      • then the more eye movements people that that we can find on a certain object it's not only true for faces also other objects
      • the more red the more eye movements landed in the face of
      • in this case a white person
      • and this is a clear indicator that this person here found more beauty in the right than in the left face
      • and that's very reliable
    1. i try to use the term white supremacy to talk about that history and white nationalism to talk about this 00:02:31 social movement and because it's a movement where people recognize each other they know uh their friends
      • white nationalists see their movement as a social movement, not as racism.
  14. Jan 2023
    1. As I use the term here, “governance” is not limited to the official activities of government alone. Governance in the broad sense is an interlocking system of collective action steering mechanisms ideally guided by impartial rules of law and comprised of the administrative and representative political institutions of government, economic and sociological institutions, and cultural systems of norms, meanings, and relationships. In a democracy, the steering of these systems of collective action is ultimately subject to judgments concerning the justice and legitimacy of current and proposed future governance by a discursive participatory citizenry. This citizenry continually engages in a process of pluralistic debate refereed by reason and the persuasive force of the better argument. Such participatory dialogue is often referred to as the civic or “public sphere” of society. It is a place of norms and ideals—a declarative place of what is the case, and a subjunctive place of what could be the case.

      !- role of participatory democracy : governance

      !- comment - this is what bottom-up rapid whole system change relies upon - Indyweb / SRG / TPF aspires to create such a global space

  15. Aug 2022
    1. A month before the ceremony, the activist organization American Indian Movement had occupied the South Dakota town of Wounded Knee to protest the sustained mistreatment of Native Americans, a standoff that at the time of Littlefeather’s televised appearance at the Oscars was under a U.S. Department of Justice-imposed media blackout.)
    1. have really rapidly moving creatures and rapidly thinking creatures, which is a form of movement

      Ward in the context of Rare Earth hypothesis says this. An intriguing notion seeing thinking as a form of (deliberate) movement. How is this meant / to be understood? Chemically, in terms of what it requires in an animal (ie us)? The remark is made in the context of the need for oxygen for complex life to be possible. (based on David Catling Univ of Washington) after all. Or environmentally/contextually, as both deliberate physical movement and brain activity are response to outside impulses?

  16. Jun 2022
    1. Maxine Greene for example, begins by writing that “We are convinced that the movement towards educational technology is irreversible and that our obligation as educators is to learn how to deal with it,” but then she turns that resignation into resistance by adding, “how, if you like, to live with it as fully conscious human beings working to enable other human beings to become conscious, to become responsible, to learn.”

      If it's true that the movement toward technology is inevitable, how might we deal with it?

      Compare this with the solution(s) that nomadic hunter-gatherers had to face when changing from a lifestyle built on movement to one of settling down to a life of agriculture. Instead of attaching their knowledge and memories to their landscape as before, they built structures (like Stonehenge) to form these functions.

      Part of moving forward may involve moving back historically to better understand these ideas and methods and regaining them so that we might then reattach them to a digital substrate. How can we leverage the modalities of the digital for art, song, dance, music, and even the voice into digital spaces (if we must?). All digital or only digital certainly isn't the encompassing answer, but if we're going to do it, why not leverage the ability to do this?

      As an example, Hypothes.is allows for annotating text to insert photos, emoji, audio (for music and voice), and even video. Videos might include dance and movement related cues that students might recreate physically. These could all be parts of creating digital songlines through digital spaces that students can more easily retrace to store their learnings for easier recall and to build upon in the future.

    1. (a) What are the key levers and leverage points in social systems that might drive transformative change towards sustainability? (b) How are these derived from and perceived within and across academic literatures and in practice? (c) How might the levers and leverage points work together?

      Key questions are asked and the nexus approach of looking at the entire gestalt, consisting of many moving parts and their feedbacks is critical for avoiding and mitigating unintended consequences, also known as progress traps.

      Bringing this to a global public space to create engagement is critical to create a groundswell. The public must understand that leverage points offer us our greatest hope. Once they understand them, everyone can help to identify and participate in leverage points.

      Collectively mapping them and their many feedbacks in a global, open source map - an open knowledge commons (OKC) or open wisdom commons (OWC) for system change will drive global participation.

    1. Newton had discovered, during classes at San Francisco Law School, that California law allowed people to carry guns in public so long as they were visible, and not pointed at anyone in a threatening way.In February of 1967, Oakland police officers stopped a car carrying Newton, Seale, and several other Panthers with rifles and handguns. When one officer asked to see one of the guns, Newton refused. “I don’t have to give you anything but my identification, name, and address,” he insisted. This, too, he had learned in law school.
  17. May 2022
  18. Mar 2022
    1. In a study carried out by Susan Goldin-Meadow and colleagues at theUniversity of Chicago, a group of adults was recruited to watch video recordingsof children solving conservation problems, like the water-pouring task weencountered earlier. They were then offered some basic information aboutgesture: that gestures often convey important information not found in speech,and that they could attend not only to what people say with their words but alsoto what they “say” with their hands. It was suggested that they could payparticular attention to the shape of a hand gesture, to the motion of a handgesture, and to the placement of a hand gesture. After receiving these simpleinstructions, study subjects watched the videos once more. Before the briefgesture training, the observing adults identified only around 30 to 40 percent ofinstances when children displayed emerging knowledge in their gestures; afterreceiving the training, their hit rate shot up to about 70 percent.

      Concentrating on the shape, motion, and placement of hand gestures dramatically help a learner to more concretely understand material and understanding in others.

      Link this to the use of movement in dance with respect to memory in Lynne Kelly's work.

    2. gesture isimpressionistic and holistic, conveying an immediate sense of how things lookand feel and move.

      Gestures provide a powerful and immediate sense of how things look, feel, and move and provide facilities that can't be matched by spoken communication.


      Link this to the idea of dance being used in oral cultures to communicate the movement of animals, particularly in preparation for hunting. cross reference: Songlines and Knowledge and Power by Lynne Kelly

      Link to [[a picture is worth a thousand words]]

    1. If humans, some humans, start making bad decisions and start destroying the institutions that kept the peace, then we will be back in the era of war with budgets, military budgets going to 20, 30, 40 percent. It can happen. It's in our hands.

      An economic diversion of this scale would make it far more likely that humanity will not be able to prevent, but indeed accelerate planetary tipping points! Hence the urgency of this crisis for the climate movement. This implies that the climate movement and the antiwar movement must now synchronize resources and form a coherent, unified strategy

  19. Jan 2022
    1. And contrary to that science-denying slogan of Margaret Thatcher’s, that “there is no such thing as society,” no human has ever survived or thrived without a tribe or society.

      Is this a general feature of the conservative far right of constantly denying our humanity and care for each other?

  20. Nov 2021
    1. "Over the past few years I've come to appreciate that freedom of [mental] movement is the key," he said, highlighting the nature of liquidity in putting thoughts to the page. "When you look about the freedom of your own hands moving, you have such incredible freedom of movement."'
  21. Oct 2021
    1. I wrote about the Bauhaus for Designlab, but they did not publish my article, so I connected with the Bauhaus Movement, shared the article with their followers on Facebook, and continued my exploration of Cultural Evolution, Social Physics, and Metaphysical Design.

    1. Germany is celebrating 100 years since the beginnings of the Bauhaus in 1919.

      I wrote this article as a survey of articles about the Bauhaus.

    1. I just bookmarked this article published today in Current Biology for later reading and annotation. While the article isn't specifically focused on memory, the fact that it touches on visual structures, emotion, music, and movement (dance) which are core to some peoples' memory toolkits, I thought that many here would find it to be of interest.

      One of the authors provided the following tl;dr synopsis:

      "Across the world, people express emotion through music and dance. But why do music and dance go together?

      We tested a deceptively simple hypothesis: Music and movement are represented the same way in the brain."

      For those who haven't integrated song or dance into their practices, searching around for the idea of songlines will give you some background on their possible uses.

      cc: @LynneKelly

    1. Visual and auditory brain areas share a representational structure that supports emotion perception https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(21)01283-5

      This portends some interesting results with relation to mnemonics and particularly songlines and indigenous peoples' practices which integrate song, movement, and emotion.

      Preprint: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/254961v4

      Across the world, people express emotion through music and dance. But why do music and dance go together? <br><br>We tested a deceptively simple hypothesis: Music and movement are represented the same way in the brain.

      — Beau Sievers (@beausievers) October 12, 2021
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Beau Sievers </span> in "New work published today in Current Biology Visual and auditory brain areas share a representational structure that supports emotion perception With @ThaliaWheatley @k_v_n_l @parkinsoncm @sergeyfogelson (thread after coffee!) https://t.co/AURqH9kNLb https://t.co/ro4o4oEwk5" / Twitter (<time class='dt-published'>10/12/2021 09:26:10</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Magazine of the Bauhaus Movement

      On September 8, 2021, I received an email from Orhan Cakir, Managing Director, Bauhaus Movement:

      Dear Stephen…

      I wanted to let you know that from November we will be publishing the Bauhaus Movement Magazine every 3 months. I would like to have an interview with you and your activities regarding the Bauhaus in Canada. The magazine is published in several languages and regions. Can you imagine a collaboration?

    2. We officially announce the launch of our new Bauhaus Podcast.
    1. Bauhaus Podcast

      Let’s shape our future, together.

      The Bauhaus Podcast is a place for creative thinking We officially announce the launch of our new Bauhaus Podcast.

      This podcast, where experts, users and professionals share their practical knowledge and experiences, is entirely dedicated to Bauhaus architecture, design and science in all its facets.

  22. Sep 2021
    1. Valorize motion, not sitting still.

      I wonder how much of our genetic programming is based on centuries of evolution with humans moving around their landscapes and attaching their memories to them?

      Within Lynne Kelly's thesis about stone circles, henges, etc. most of the locations have roads and entryways into them which require movement much less the idea of dancing and singing attached to memory performance as well.

    2. Small motions are so important that Paul devotes an entire chapter to the value of gestures. “Gestures,” she says, “don’t merely echo or amplify spoken language; they carry out cognitive and communicative functions that language can’t touch” (69). Gestures strengthen our ability to give form to thoughts, they increase the effectiveness of communication, they help groups understand each other, they create and direct attention.

      This likely underlies some of the thoughts I've had about dance and movement and which are touched on by indigenous cultures as documented in Lynne Kelly's work.

  23. Jul 2021
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  28. Dec 2020
    1. Andrew Bosworth, one of Facebook’s longtime executives, has compared Facebook to sugar—in that it is “delicious” but best enjoyed in moderation. In a memo originally posted to Facebook’s internal network last year, he argued for a philosophy of personal responsibility. “My grandfather took such a stance towards bacon and I admired him for it,” Bosworth wrote. “And social media is likely much less fatal than bacon.”

      Another example of comparing social media and food.

  29. Nov 2020
    1. This is fascinating. I recognize it as something that is common knowledge to trained Feldenkrais Method practitioners. I have gained similar benefits from visiting a Feldenkrais practitioner and many more musculo skeletal benefits as well. They use very gentle, gradual and time-consuming "movement training" to "reset" muscular habits, many of which are harmful. It is amazing how much they can improve in every part of the musculo-skeleture, there are hundreds of muscles in complex patterns that can be getting inefficiently and parasitically employed. It can make a massive difference to the ease of daily life.When it comes to posture, trying to force the correct posture is hopeless; what is needed, is to "switch off" the muscles that shouldn't be "on", and vice versa. Most people can't just do that by mimicking a position. In Feldenkrais, mostly you are relaxed and lying on your back, and the practitioner gently performs repetitive counter-intuitive movements of your limbs etc which "persuade" muscles a certain way. Then when you sit up or stand up again, you tend to be "relaxed in the correct posture" rather than trying to force yourself into it.
    1. Strategy/Wikimedia movement/2018-20/Transition/List of Initiatives

      Anotaré los temas de mi interés. por la revisión resultaron ser:

      • Increase the sustainability of our movement
      • Ensure equity in decision making
      • Identify topics for impact
  30. Oct 2020
    1. We advocate for a Slow Web Movement. We are what we eat, and we are also what we consume online. Data-driven advertising, BlackBox algorithms, and the competition between Big Tech to keep us “engaged“ has created an addiction to low-value content. It is time to reset our digital consumption and create healthier habits. Since the last decade, with a set of guidelines, the Slow Web Movement is changing Software to make it care about us again. Think of it as the equivalent of "Organic" for Technology.

      As solid a pitch for the slow web movement as I've seen yet from an analogy perspective.

    1. They also found themselves unable to sustain and organize in the long term in a manner proportional to the energy they had been able to attract initially and the legitimacy they enjoyed in their demands.

      This reminds me of an excellent example I heard recently on Scene on Radio's Men series which tells the story of a rape which occurred several years prior to the bus boycott that helped to rally the community and make the bus boycott far more successful than it would have been without the prior incident and local reportage.

      The relevant audio begins (with some background) at approximately 22:40 into the episode.

    1. Mutual aid societies were built on the razed foundations of the old  guilds, and cooperatives and mass political parties then drew on the  experience of the mutual aid societies."

      This reminds me of the beginning of the Civil Rights movement that grew out of the civic glue that arose out of prior work relating to rape cases several years prior.

      I recall Zeynep Tufekci writing a bit about some of these tangential ideas in some of her social network writing. (Where's the link to that?)

  31. Sep 2020
  32. Aug 2020
    1. Anil Dash said it well: In general, a healthy mix of time spent online should be like healthy sourcing of food — it’s fine to have fast food from factories, but you want to make sure to also have fresh, local apps and sites and content, created by people you know and love, sourced within your community.

      Another example of a web-related food analogy

  33. Jul 2020
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  36. Apr 2020