195 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Nov 2022
    1. git_workspace/ ├── .vscode │ └── settings.json # global settings, my preferred ones ├── my-personal-projects/ │ └── project1/ │ └── .git/ └── company-projects/ ├── .vscode │ └── settings.json # local settings, overrides some of my personal ones ├── project2/ │ └── .git/ └── project3/ └── .git/
    1. How do you make sure you don’t lose track of cards? I don’t make sure I don’t lose track of cards. As I said above and as some of the people below talk about, one of the joys of the system is when you surprise yourself, when you rediscover, when you find the perfect card while you were looking for something else.

      Oppenheimer doesn't keep track of specific cards (he didn't discuss how he files them, other than loosely together, potentially for specific projects) and finds that this creates a greater amount of surprise for him when searching for ideas within his system.

      Missing here is any sort of topic or subject headings.... double check this as it's a key to most systems.

  3. Oct 2022
    1. Most men's notes are useless stuff to others, useless even to them-selves with the passage of time, and useless especially because ofchaotic arrangement.
    1. Mosca backs up histhesis with this assertion: It's the power of organization thatenables the minority always to rule. There are organizedminorities and they run things and men. There are unorganizedmajorities and they are run.

      In a democracy, is it not just rule by majority, but rule by the most organized that ends up dominating the society?

      Perhaps C. Wright Mills' work on the elite has some answers?

      The Republican party's use of organization to create gerrymandering is a clear example of using extreme organization to create minority rule. Cross reference: Slay the Dragon in which this issue is laid out with the mention of using a tiny amount of money to careful gerrymander maps to provide outsized influences and then top-down outlines to imprint broad ideas from a central location onto smaller individual constituencies (state and local).

    2. A personal file is thesocial organization of the individual's memory; it in-creases the continuity between life and work, and it per-mits a continuity in the work itself, and the planning of thework; it is a crossroads of life experience, professionalactivities, and way of work. In this file the intellectualcraftsman tries to integrate what he is doing intellectuallyand what he is experiencing as a person.

      Again he uses the idea of a "file" which I read and understand as similar to the concepts of zettelkasten or commonplace book. Unlike others writing about these concepts though, he seems to be taking a more holistic and integrative (life) approach to having and maintaining such system.

      Perhaps a more extreme statement of this might be written as "zettelkasten is life" or the even more extreme "life is zettelkasten"?

      Is his grounding in sociology responsible for framing it as a "social organization" of one's memory?


      It's not explicit, but this statement could be used as underpinning or informing the idea of using a card index as autobiography.

      How does this compare to other examples of this as a function?

  4. Sep 2022
  5. Aug 2022
    1. 2) The kanji are organized in chapters with wide themes (respectively: world, food, animals, people, body, spirit, power, learn, tools, places, journey). These chapters are in turn divided up into mini-themes dealing with each chapter (for example, different animals and ideas associated with them). This helped me a lot in mentally organizing kanji and their meanings.
    1. If this fits your style and you don’t get any value out of having cards with locators like 3a4b/65m1, then don’t do that (for you) useless make-work. Make sure your system is working for you and you’re not working for your system.

      Risks of replicating physical attributes in digital systems

      This article makes so much sense, but this sentence more than any other. As librarians will will know, a physical book can only be put in one place on a shelf...you can't realistically replicate a book and put it in groupings with all like-minded books. The call number was invented to bring organization to the physical space and the card catalog was invented to have a way for representations of the books—cards!—interfiled in many places to help with finding the book. Luhmann's card numbering sequence was the first thing I dropped when reading about Zettelkasten, and those that insist on that mechanism for their digital slip boxes are artificially constraining their electronic systems with a physical world limitation.

    1. Stigmergy (/ˈstɪɡmərdʒi/ STIG-mər-jee) is a mechanism of indirect coordination, through the environment, between agents or actions.

      Example: ant pheromone paths

      Within ants, there can be a path left for others to follow, but what about natural paths in our environment that influence us to take them because of the idea of the "path of least resistence" or the effects of having paved cow paths.

      Similarly being lead by "the company that you keep".

      relathionship to research on hanging out with fat people tending to make one fatter.

  6. Jul 2022
    1. As I was thinking through this on Friday, Culture Study subscriber and organizer Siena Chiang articulated the framework I needed. In a thread dedicated to the repeal of Roe in the Culture Study Discord, people were asking what so many of us were asking: what do we do. “Get organized,” Siena said. “Not just mobilized, which is showing up at a rally once or twice. Organized means acting in coordination with others who have a long term strategy. Finding a local group doing direct, tangible work and asking them how to help. They’re probably inundated right now so commit to following up in the coming month. Go in person if that’s appropriate, don’t just email. Show up thoughtfully. Be consistent and reliable. Follow their lead.”
  7. Jun 2022
    1. The Essential Habits ofDigital Organizers

      This chapter is too entailed with productivity advice, which can be useful to some, but isn't as note taking focused for those who probably need more of that.

      What is the differentiator between knowledge workers, knowledge creators, students, researchers, academics. How do we even clearly delineate knowledge worker as a concept. It feels far too nebulous which makes it more difficult to differentiate systems for them to use for improving productivity and efficiency.

    2. You never knowwhen the rejected scraps from one project might become the perfectmissing piece in another. The possibilities are endless.

      He says this, but his advice on how to use them is too scant and/or flawed. Where are they held? How are they indexed? How are they linked so that finding and using them in the future? (especially, other than rote memory or the need to have vague memory and the ability to search for them in the future?)

    3. We are organizing for actionability

      Organize for actionability.

      (Applicable only for P.A.R.A.?)

      This is interesting for general project management, but potentially not for zettelkasten-type notes. That method has more flexibility that doesn't require this sort of organizational method and actually excels as a result of it.

      There is a tension here.


      Notes primarily for project-based productivity are different from notes for writing-based output.

    4. Instead of organizing ideas according to where they come from, Irecommend organizing them according to where they are going

      This is a useful distinction.

    5. The goal of organizing our knowledge is to move our goalsforward, not get a PhD in notetaking.

      HA! Though many do fall into this trap.

    1. Beethoven, despite his unruly reputation and wild romantic image, waswell organized. He saved everything in a series of notebooks that were organizedaccording to the level of development of the idea. He had notebooks for rough ideas,notebooks for improvements on those ideas, and notebooks for finished ideas,almost as if he was pre-aware of an idea’s early, middle, and late stages.

      Beethoven apparently kept organized notebooks for his work. His system was arranged based on the level of finished work, so he had spaces for rough ideas, improved ideas and others for finished ideas.

      Source for this?

  8. May 2022
    1. over the past decade and change a dynamic ecosystem has developed around cryptocurrencies and blockchains. And it’s constantly getting more complicated. We’ve now got non-fungible tokens, or NFTs, unique digital bits purchased with crypto that have mostly been associated with weird pieces of digital art and are an arena that looks very much like a bubble. There are stablecoins, cryptocurrencies that are supposed to be less volatile, pegged to something like the US dollar. There’s also the burgeoning world of decentralized finance, or DeFi, which tries to replicate a lot of the financial system but without intermediaries, and there are decentralized autonomous organizations, or DAOs, essentially internet collectives. Now, much of this is falling under the still-nascent umbrella of Web3, a relatively fuzzy reimagining of the internet on blockchains.

      Putting it all together.

    1. This art of method was understood by Ramus and Ramists as its own efficacious art of memory. InScholae in liberales artes, Ramus is explicit about his disdain for the visual mnemonic rules suggested byclassical sources.“The art of memory,”he counters,“consists entirely in division and composition. If weseek then an art which will divide and compose things, we shall find the art of memory”(qtd. in Yates 233).Ramus thus enfolds the fourth canon into his methodical framework, linking memorization of content withits“division and composition,”that is, with its organization.

      Arrangement and organization definitely have their place and can be helpful. However they may also tend to become too rigid to the point that one's thinking begins to lack creativity and invention. Where is the space for the Llullist arts of combinatorial thought here?

    1. In this week’s leaked draft of a Supreme Court opinion overturning Roe v. Wade, Justice Samuel Alito wrote, “The inescapable conclusion is that a right to abortion is not deeply rooted in the Nation’s history and traditions.” Yet abortion was so “deeply rooted” in colonial America that one of our nation’s most influential architects went out of his way to insert it into the most widely and enduringly read and reprinted math textbook of the colonial Americas—and he received so little pushback or outcry for the inclusion that historians have barely noticed it is there. Abortion was simply a part of life, as much as reading, writing, and arithmetic.

      Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito has written in a leaked draft opinion of Dobs v. Jackson Women's Health that "The inescapable conclusion is that a right to abortion is not deeply rooted in the Nation's history and traditions."

      However, historians have shown that in fact it was so deeply rooted in in early America that Benjamin Franklin, one of the founding fathers of the country actively inserted medical advice about abortion into a widely read and popular primer on math and reading.

    1. The justices held their final arguments of the current term on Wednesday. The court has set a series of sessions over the next two months to release rulings in its still-unresolved cases, including the Mississippi abortion case.

      It's very likely that the decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization would have been released late in the typical cycle. The leak of this document prior to the midterm elections may have some profound effects on the election cycle.

  9. Apr 2022
  10. Mar 2022
    1. If you want to organize said migrations in their purpose you'll probably have a folder for the struture ones and another for the data ones.
    2. not as good/useful as some other gem options/approaches, such as the one that adds a data method per migration, or that lets you tag with :post_deploy, etc.

  11. Feb 2022
    1. The second reason might support positive change. The existence of tokens and decentralization means that it’s possible to build resilient open source communities where early contributors and supporters benefit handsomely over time. No one owns these communities, and we can hope that these communities will work hard to serve themselves and their users, not the capital markets or other short-term players.

      Capitalism's subject is Capital, not the bourgeoisie or an owner class. "Open source communities" are still corporations.

    1. Because of the constantly growing number of volumes, and to minimize coordination issues, Gottfried van Swieten emphasizes a set of instructions for registering all the books of the court library. Written instructions are by no means common prior to the end of the eighteenth century. Until then, cataloging takes place under the supervision of a librarian who instructs scriptors orally, pointing out problems and corrections as every-one goes along.

      Unlike prior (oral) efforts, Gottfried van Swieten created a writtten set of instructions for cataloging texts at the Austrian National Library. This helped to minimize coordination issues as well as time to teach and perfect the system.


      Written rules, laws, and algorithms help to create self-organization. This is done by saving time and energy that would have gone into the work of directed building of a system instead. The saved work can then be directed towards something else potentially more productive or regenerative.

  12. Dec 2021
    1. Lisa Jacobs, the founder and chief executive of Imagine It Done, a home organization service in New York City, said that out of hundreds of projects in the past few years, she can recall only three requests to organize books. In one of those examples, the arranged books were treated as a backdrop — to be admired, but not read. “The clientele that has collected books through the years are not as numerous for us,” she said.

      Any book collector worth their salt will already have in mind the way they want their collection arranged. Only someone who wants to use it as wallpaper would have a service arrange it.

      I wonder what the other two cases were?

  13. Nov 2021
    1. Now that we're digitizing the Zettelkasten we often find dated notes that say things like "note 60,7B3 is missing". This note replaces the original note at this position. We often find that the original note is maybe only 20, 30 notes away, put back in the wrong position. But Luhmann did not start looking, because where should he look? How far would he have to go to maybe find it again? So, instead he adds the "note is missing"-note. Should he bump into the original note by chance, then he could put it back in its original position. Or else, not.

      Niklas Luhmann had a simple way of dealing with lost cards by creating empty replacements which could be swapped out if found later. It's not too dissimilar to doing inventory in a book store where mischievous customers pick up books, move them, or even hide them sections away. Going through occasionally or even regularly or systematically would eventually find lost/misfiled cards unless they were removed entirely from the system (similar to stolen books).

  14. Oct 2021
  15. Sep 2021
    1. There are endless ways of organizing your notes—by book, by author, by topic, by the time of reading. It doesn’t matter which system you use as long as you will be able to find the notes in the future.

      Or by all of the above... Library card catalogues did all three, but most digital systems will effectuate all of them as well.

  16. Aug 2021
    1. Like the spatial hierarchies presented in the Philosophia botanica, he wanted asimple form of linear order that allowed him to access his sheets quickly. Such a desire led himto reject the spatial divisions featured in many contemporary curiosity and medical cabinets, thatis, closed drawers that were stacked in multiple columns. This rejection was probably linked tothe fact that he had already seen a better way forward in the form of filing systems that werephysical instantiations of commonplace divisions used so often in books.

      Linnaeus used the logic of topical headings in commonplace books as an intellectual framework for designing a better filing system for his physical plant specimens. This was in marked contrast to the sorts of contemporary curiosity and medical cabinets that others were using at the time.

    1. William Ross Ashby (1903-1972) was a British pioneer in the fields of cybernetics and systems theory. He is best known for proposing the law of requisite variety, the principle of self-organization, intelligence amplification, the good regulator theorem, building the automatically stabilizing Homeostat, and his books Design for a Brain (1952) and An Introduction to Cybernetics (1956).

  17. Jul 2021
  18. Jun 2021
    1. We’ve broken our project up into three different types of packages: apps which are preact apps intended to be bundled and deployed somewhere, modules which are plain npm packages for node/browsers and do not bundle their dependencies, and workers which are either Worker or ServiceWorker scripts entirely bundled up with no imports or exports. We don’t have to keep these three types of packages separated, but it helps us navigate around.
    1. Most of the matchers provided by this gem are useful in a Rails context, and as such, can be used for different parts of a Rails app: database models backed by ActiveRecord non-database models, form objects, etc. backed by ActiveModel controllers routes (RSpec only) Rails-specific features like delegate
  19. May 2021
    1. Johnny Decimal seems to be an interesting organizational structure for putting things into. Not sure if it's something I'm going to use any time soon, but intriguing.

  20. Apr 2021
  21. Mar 2021
    1. Famously, he found many of the answers in state, local, and even neighborhood institutions. He wrote approvingly of American federalism, which “permits the Union to enjoy the power of a great republic and the security of a small one.” He liked the traditions of local democracy too, the “township institutions” that “give the people the taste for freedom and the art of being free.” Despite the vast empty spaces of their country, Americans met one another, made decisions together, carried out projects together. Americans were good at democracy because they practiced democracy. They formed what he called “associations,” the myriad organizations that we now call “civil society,” and they did so everywhere:Not only do [Americans] have commercial and industrial associations in which all take part, but they also have a thousand other kinds: religious, moral, grave, futile, very general and very particular, immense and very small; Americans use associations to give fêtes, to found seminaries, to build inns, to raise churches, to distribute books, to send missionaries to the antipodes; in this manner they create hospitals, prisons, schools … Everywhere that, at the head of a new undertaking, you see the government in France and a great lord in England, count on it that you will perceive an association in the United States.

      Small individual communities all making and promoting things can be a powerful thing.

      Where have we gone wrong?

  22. Feb 2021
    1. Another thing I don’t like: our asset behavior is decoupled from the assets. If you’re mucking around in your app/assets folder, then you have to first know that such a config exists, and then hunt it down in a totally different config folder. It would be nice if, while we’re working in asset land, we didn’t have to mentally jump around.
    1. In the past 1 ½ years something weird happened: a real core team formed around the Trailblazer gems. I say “real” because in the past 15 years of OSS, I’ve had people come and go, being of great help but never staying and taking over long-term responsibilities - which I found to be the pivotal element of a core team. Eventually, those kids convinced me to start the Trailblazer organization on Github and move over all “apotonick gems”. Over the course of time, I saw myself giving away that aforementioned responsibility with a smile on my face, adding owners and collaborators to gems, yes, even giving away entire gems, letting people work on documentation and just trusting someone and their skills. I have no words to describe how good that feels!
    1. Trailblazer extends the conventional MVC stack in Rails. Keep in mind that adding layers doesn't necessarily mean adding more code and complexity. The opposite is the case: Controller, view and model become lean endpoints for HTTP, rendering and persistence. Redundant code gets eliminated by putting very little application code into the right layer.
    2. Trailblazer offers you a new, more intuitive file layout in applications.
    3. Instead of grouping by technology, classes and views are structured by concept, and then by technology. A concept can relate to a model, or can be a completely abstract concern such as invoicing.
    1. ActiveInteraction plays nicely with Rails. You can use interactions to handle your business logic instead of models or controllers.
    2. Why is all this interaction code better? Two reasons: One, you can reuse the FindAccount interaction in other places, like your API controller or a Resque task. And two, if you want to change how accounts are found, you only have to change one place.

      Pretty weak arguments though...

      1. We could just as easily used a plain object or module to extract this for easy reuse and having it in only one place (avoiding duplication).
  23. Jan 2021
  24. Dec 2020
    1. It seeks to empower us, help us organize, and improve our communication.
    2. a co-op of worker-owners, and hopefully one day a platform co-op (communities owning themselves? absurd)
  25. Nov 2020
  26. Oct 2020
    1. This simplifies maintenance and keeps things clean by allowing related code to be grouped before inclusion elsewhere.
    1. withindex.js, we have a single source of truth, giving fine grained control on what we expose to the outside world.
    2. import statements will become much smaller, as we will be importing stuff from less files. For example AbstractNode.js has only on import statement now, where it had two before.
    3. The reason that this solves our problem is: we now have full control over the module loading order. Whatever the import order in internal.js is, will be our module loading order.
    4. Here are few, real-life commits of refactorings that make use of this solution:
    5. The crux of this pattern is to introduce an index.js and internal.js file.
    1. Yeah I see what you're saying. In my case, I had a group of classes that relied on each other but they were all part of one conceptual "module" so I made a new file that imports and exposes all of them. In that new file I put the imports in the right order and made sure no code accesses the classes except through the new interface.
    1. In some cases, I could also create a component without any <script> tag at all. So in that way, I could actually bulk up the logic in one place if I could get some help from the #with block.
    1. Separately, I wondered about having a central registry of warnings, since they're a bit scattered around at the moment. That way, we could check that someone wasn't trying to ignore a non-existent warning.

      centralized

    1. I'm also persuaded by the arguments that it will be easier to track stuff down by co-location.
    2. I also think this would be great in terms of colocation. If I need some intermediate result I no longer have to jump between script and markup.
    3. I'm persuaded that co-locating just this one type of logic will be useful.
    4. I like this, mostly because it allows me to write small components without creating another separate sub-component for holding the value simple computation. I get annoyed every time I need to create a component just to hold a variable, or even move the computation away from the relevant location. It reminds me of the days where variables in C had to be declared at the top of the function.
    5. it also allows for more divergence in how people write there code and where they put their logic, making different svelte codebases potentially even more different due to fewer constraints. This last point is actually something I really value, I read a lot of Svelte code by a lot of different people and broadly speaking things look the same and are in the same places.
    1. When I say that my experience is that it means it's time to split up your components, I guess I mean that there tends to be a logical grouping between all the things that care about (for example) sqr_n, and in Svelte, logical groupings are expressed as components.
    1. Principle #8: Organize your notes by context, not by topic
    2. instead of filing things away according to where they came from, you file them according to where they’re going. This is the essential difference between organizing like a librarian and organizing like a writer.
  27. Sep 2020
    1. I took the same approach with _layout.svelte and not just for the svelte-apollo client. Except I put all of that setup into another module (setup.js) and imported from _layout. I just couldn't stomach having all that code actually in my _layout file. It's for layout, supposedly, but it's the only component that is a parent to the whole app.
    2. I got this working by using _layout.svelte as the point to initialise and set the Client we can then use getClient in each route that uses this layout.
    1. Because of that, it's easy to end up in a situation where the styles for a given piece of markup are defined far away (in terms of number of lines) from the markup itself, which reduces the advantage of having styles and markup co-located in the first place.
    1. It’s become increasingly common to divide code into components, rather than by file type. React, for example, allows for the collocation of a components markup and JavaScript. In Svelte, this is taken one logical step further: the Javascript, markup and styling for a component can all exist together in a single `.svelte`​ file
  28. Aug 2020
  29. Jul 2020
  30. Jun 2020
    1. Open Science and reproducible research

      This material might do better earlier in the module, or as a sidebar. It seems out of place here.

    2. BEFORE YOU START

      The organization is somewhat confusing here. This section does not appear in the outline. It is somewhat unexpected to have something before the introduction. If there is material before an introduction, it could be called a preface or prologue.

    3. This is the first of 10 core modules

      Clarify what aspects of the MOOC are currently available in what formats.

  31. May 2020