39 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Apr 2024
    1. The neglect of the book is however not altogether advanta- 78geous.

      There is a range of reading lengths and levels of argumentation which can be found in these various ranges.

      Some will complain about the death of books or the rise of articles or the rise of social media and the attention economy. Where is balance to be found.

      Kaiser speaks to these issues in ¶75-79. One must wonder what Kaiser would have thought about the bite-sized nature of social media and it's distracting nature?

  3. Jan 2024
    1. Seit 2000 sind mindestens 4 Millionen Menschen direkt an Folgen der globalen Erhitzung gestorben. Diese Minimalschätzung in einer neuen Studie begründet, die globale Erhitzung schon jetzt als Gesundheitsnotstand zu behandeln. https://www.repubblica.it/green-and-blue/2024/01/31/news/negli_ultimi_ventanni_la_crisi_del_clima_ha_causato_4_milioni_di_morti-422021774/

    1. Greek plays are not just about entertainment; they are invitations to the audience to discuss political events.

      Greek plays are either tragedies or comedies. There is a much deeper meaning to them than just entertaining the public. Keeping this in mind when reading the stories gives them a much deeper meaning.(https://www.worldhistory.org/Greek_Theatre/) To know the full extent of what they were really meant for is important to the readers. For this specific play, the meaning behind the story is that the men in charge are operating from an excessively limited perspective as they ignore their partners' informed advice. This is a huge political controversy to this day. Women are very overlooked in society especially considering how far back this is dated. Back when this play was written women were given tasks like cooking and cleaning and had little to no rights so this was a good political example of how they were treated and overlooked.

    1. I've sketched it out elsewhere but let's memorialize the broad strokes here because we're inspired at the moment... come back later and add in quotes from Luhmann and other sources (@Heyde1931).

      Luhmann was balancing the differences between topically arranged commonplaces and the topical nature of the Dewey Decimal System (a standardized version across thousands of collections) and building neighborhoods of related ideas.

      One of the issues with commonplace books, is planning them out in advance. How might you split up a notebook for long term use to create easy categories when you don't know how much room to give each in advance? (If you don't believe me, stop by r/commonplacebooks where you're likely to see this question pop up several times this year.) This issue is remedied when John Locke suggests keeping commonplaces in chronological order of their appearance and cross-indexing them.

      This creates a new problem of a lot of indexing and increased searching over time as the commonplace book scales. Translating to index cards complicates things because they're unattached and can potentially move about, so they don't have the anchor effectuated by their being bound up in a notebook. But being on slips allows them to be more easily shuffled, rearranged, and even put into outlines, which are all fantastic affordances when looking for creativity or scaffolding things out into an article or book for creation.

      As a result, numbering slips creates a solid anchor by which the cards can be placed and always returned for later finding and use. But how should we number them? Should it be with integers and done chronologically? (1, 2, 3, ..., n) This is nice, but makes a mish-mash of things and doesn't assist much in indexing or finding.

      Why not go back to Dewey, which has been so popular? But not Dewey in the broadest sense of using numbers to tie ideas to concrete categories. An individual's notes are idiosyncratic and it would be increasingly rare for people to have the same note, much less need a standardized number for it (and if they were standardized, who does that work and how is it distributed so everyone could use it?) No, instead, let's just borrow the decimal structure of Dewey's system. One of the benefits of his decimal structure is that an infinity of new books can be placed on ever-expanding bookshelves without needing to restructure the numbering system. Just keep adding decimal places onto the end when necessary. This allows for immense density when necessary. But, importantly, it also provides some fantastic level of serendipity.

      Let's say you go to learn about geometry, so you look up the topic in your trusty library card catalog. Do you really need to look at the hundreds of records returned? Probably not. You only need the the Dewey Decimal Number 516. Once you're at the shelves, you can browse through that section to see what's there and interesting in the space. You might also find things on the shelves above or below 516 and find the delights of topology and number theory or abstract algebra and real analysis. Subjects you might not necessarily have had in mind will suddenly present themselves for your consideration. Even if your initial interest may have been in Zhongmin Shen's Lectures on Finsler geometry (516.375), you might also profitably walk away with James E. Humphreys' Introduction to Lie Algebras and Representation Theory (512.55).

      So what happens if we use these decimal numbers for our notes? First we will have the ability to file things between and amongst each other to infinity. By filing things closest to things which seem related to each other, we'll create neighborhoods of ideas which can easily grow over time. Related ideas will stay together while seemingly related ideas on first blush may slowly grow away from each other over time as even more closely related ideas move into the neighborhood between them. With time and careful work, you'll have not only a breadth of ideas, but a massive depth of them too.

      The use of decimal numbering provides us with a few additional affordances:

      1 (Neighborhoods of ideas) 1.1 combinatorial creativity Neighborhoods of ideas can help to fuel combinatorial creativity and forge new connections as well as insight over time. 1.2 writing One might take advantage of these growing neighborhoods to create new things. Perhaps you've been working for a while and you see you have a large number of cards in a particular area. You can, to some extent, put your hand into your box and grab a tranche of notes. By force of filing, these notes are going to be reasonably related, which means you should be able to use them to write a blog post, an article, a magazine piece, a chapter, or even an entire book (which may require a few fistfuls, as necessary.)

      2 (Sparse indexing) We don't need to index each and every single topic or concept into our index. Because we've filed things nearby, if a new card about Finsler geometry relates to another and we've already indexed the first under that topic, then we don't need to index the second, because our future selves can easily rely on the fact that if we're interested in Finsler geometry in the future, we can look that up in the index, and go to that number where we're likely to see other cards related to the topic as well as additional serendipitous ideas related to them in that same neighborhood.

      You may have heard that as Luhmann progressed on his decades long project, broadly on society and within the area of sociology, he managed to amass 90,000 index cards. How many do you suppose he indexed under the topic of sociology? Certainly he had 10s of thousands relating to his favorite subject, no? Of course he did, but what would happen over time as a collection grows? Having 20,000 indexed entries about sociology doesn't scale well for your search needs. Even 10 indexed entries may be a bit overwhelming as once you find a top level card, hundreds to thousands around it are going to be related. 10 x 100 = 1,000 cards to flip through. So if you're indexing, be conservative. In the roughly 45 years of creating 90,000 slips, Luhmann only indexed two cards with the topic of "sociology". If you look through his index, you'll find that most of his topical entries only have pointers to one or two cards, which provide an entryway into those topics which are backed up with dozens to hundreds of cards on related topics. In rarer, instances you might find three or four, but it's incredibly rare to find more than that.

      Over time, one will find that, for the topics one is most interested in, the number of ideas and cards will grown without bound. Here it makes sense to use more and more specific topics (tags, categories, taxonomies) all of which are each also sparsely indexed. Ultimately one finds that in the limit, the categories get so fractionalized that the closest category one idea has with another is the fact that they're juxtaposed closely by number. The of the decimal expansion might say something about the depth or breadth of the relationship between ideas.

      Something else arises here. At first one may have the tendency to associate their numbers with topical categories. This is only natural as it's a function at which humans all excel. But are those numbers really categories after a few weeks? Probably not. Treat them only as address numbers or GPS coordinates to be able to find your way. Your sociology section may quickly find itself with invasive species of ideas from anthropology and archaeology as well as history. If you treat all your ideas only at the topical level, they'll be miles away from where you need them to be as the smallest level atomic ideas collide with each other to generate new ideas for you. Naturally you can place them further away if you wish and attempt to bridge the distance with links to numbers in other locations, but I suspect you'll find this becomes pretty tedious over time and antithetical when it comes time to pull out a handful and write something. It's fantastically easier to pull out a several dozen and begin than it is to go through and need to pull out linked cards in a onesy-twosies manner or double check with your index to make sure you've gotten the most interesting bits. This becomes even more important as your collection scales.

  4. Apr 2023
    1. My biggest realization recently is to do whatever the opposite of atomicity is.

      Too many go too deep into the idea of "atomic notes" without either questioning or realizing their use case. What is your purpose in having atomic notes? Most writing about them online talk about the theoretical without addressing the underlying "why".

      They're great for capturing things on the go and having the ability to re-arrange and reuse them into much larger works. Often once you've used them a few times, they're less useful, specially for the average person. (Of course it's another matter if you're an academic researcher, they're probably your bread and butter.) For the beekeepers of the world who need some quick tidbits which they use frequently, then keeping them in a larger outlined document or file is really more than enough. Of course, if you're creating some longer book-length treatise on beekeeping, then it can be incredibly helpful to have them at atomic length.

      There's a spectrum from the small atomic note to the longer length file (or even book). Ask yourself, "what's your goal in having one or the other, or something in between?" They're tools, choose the best one for your needs.

  5. Mar 2023
    1. For rare words in Latin, articles may include all surviving attestations of those words. Typically only a representative selection of attestations are included in most articles which is indicated in the text by two "crossed cigars" before the lemma (or headword).

      Within the TLL's work they consider the work on each headword to be an "article" which are also individually credited.

  6. Feb 2023
    1. t that meeting—held in secret—Virginia’s Edmund Randolph began by outlining the deficiencies of the confederated form of government, and in turn what a national government should do: provide security against foreign invasion; settle quarrels between the states; promote commerce; pushback on encroachments from the state; wield power over the states.

      The secret meeting held to replace the Articles of Confederation by the US Constitution goals.

  7. Jan 2023
    1. Therefore, we propose that flow and hyperfocus are the same phenomenon. Although we are mindful that just because two phenomena are descriptively similar, they are not necessarily mechanistically identical, there is no evidence to suggest that either flow or hyperfocus are distinct.

      Ashinoff and Abu-Akel propose an equivalence between "flow" and "hyperfocus". They mention later in this paper that "flow" is more often used in positive psychology literature whereas "hyperfocus" is more often used in psychiatric literature. Even so, they also qualify that they may just appear to be the same (ie, descriptively similar) while having a different cause (ie, mechanism of action).

  8. Aug 2022
    1. A striking example is the so-called rule of Vaugelas,which involves the relation between indefinite articles and relative clauses inFrench.
  9. Apr 2022
  10. Mar 2022
    1. L’imitation et l’influence du jeu interactif sont bien mises en évidence dans une étude de Orit Hetzroni et Juman Tannous, de la Faculté des Sciences de l’éducation de l’Université de Haifa (Israël)

      ==>l’échantillon de l’étude est est extrêmement limité, l’étude n’est pas répliqué et elle ne permet pas de retirer de résultats concluants

  11. Feb 2022
  12. Dec 2021
  13. Sep 2021
  14. May 2021
    1. Network science is now a mature research field, whose growth was catalysed by the introduction of the ‘small world’ network model in 1998. Networks give mathematical descriptions of systems containing containing many interacting components, including power grids, neuronal networks and ecosystems. This collection brings together selected research, comments and review articles on how networks are structured (Layers & structure); how networks can describe healthy and disordered systems (Brain & disorders); how dynamics unfold on networks (Dynamics & spread); and community structures and resilience in networks (Community & resilience).

      This is a great looking collection of articles on network science.

  15. Apr 2021
  16. Mar 2021
    1. DEFINITE ARTICLES

      bunta bithe door

      ganaar githe fowl

      jigeen jithe woman

      nit kithe person

      nda lithe water pot

      muus mithe cat

      suuf sithe earth

      ween withe breast


      xale yithe children

      nit ñithe people


      xale bithe child (right here)

      xale bathe child (over there)

      xale bu bon – the bad child (the child who is bad)


      ndaw sithe girlfriend

      ndaw lithe messenger

      doom jithe child

      doom bithe fruit


      (definite article - indefinite article)

      biab

      giag

      miam

      sias

      wiaw

      yiay

  17. Aug 2020
    1. Cluster 0 words: family, home, mother, war, house, dies, Cluster 0 titles: Schindler's List, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Gone with the Wind, The Wizard of Oz, Titanic, Forrest Gump, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, The Silence of the Lambs, Gandhi, A Streetcar Named Desire, The Best Years of Our Lives, My Fair Lady, Ben-Hur, Doctor Zhivago, The Pianist, The Exorcist, Out of Africa, Good Will Hunting, Terms of Endearment, Giant, The Grapes of Wrath, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, The Graduate, Stagecoach, Wuthering Heights, Cluster 1 words: police, car, killed, murders, driving, house, Cluster 1 titles: Casablanca, Psycho, Sunset Blvd., Vertigo, Chinatown, Amadeus, High Noon, The French Connection, Fargo, Pulp Fiction, The Maltese Falcon, A Clockwork Orange, Double Indemnity, Rebel Without a Cause, The Third Man, North by Northwest, Cluster 2 words: father, new, york, new, brothers, apartments, Cluster 2 titles: The Godfather, Raging Bull, Citizen Kane, The Godfather: Part II, On the Waterfront, 12 Angry Men, Rocky, To Kill a Mockingbird, Braveheart, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, The Apartment, Goodfellas, City Lights, It Happened One Night, Midnight Cowboy, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Rain Man, Annie Hall, Network, Taxi Driver, Rear Window, Cluster 3 words: george, dance, singing, john, love, perform, Cluster 3 titles: West Side Story, Singin' in the Rain, It's a Wonderful Life, Some Like It Hot, The Philadelphia Story, An American in Paris, The King's Speech, A Place in the Sun, Tootsie, Nashville, American Graffiti, Yankee Doodle Dandy, Cluster 4 words: killed, soldiers, captain, men, army, command, Cluster 4 titles: The Shawshank Redemption, Lawrence of Arabia, The Sound of Music, Star Wars, 2001: A Space Odyssey, The Bridge on the River Kwai, Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, Apocalypse Now, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, Gladiator, From Here to Eternity, Saving Private Ryan, Unforgiven, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Patton, Jaws, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, Platoon, Dances with Wolves, The Deer Hunter, All Quiet on the Western Front, Shane, The Green Mile, The African Queen, Mutiny on the Bounty,

      The top IMDB films fit into 2 basic clusters, and 4 main clusters (this project used K-means with a target of 5 but actually clusters 1 and 2 both fit the crime category, and all except Cluster 3 are centred around violence).

      1. War whilst with Family and at home (violence external whilst passively defending the safety of the self/family)
      2. Crime (violence on a smaller scale)
      3. New York crime family / mafia (violence in the family)
      4. Musicals (non-violence)
      5. War as soldiers (violence on a large scale on the front lines)

      If this list is representative of the human psyche we have only 2 basic modes of being: Violence / Musical.

  18. Jun 2020
  19. Dec 2019
    1. I would tell him the same statement as the men in truck who were beating him and at that moment I felt that I was the same. I was never raised to watch violence happen against innocent people so I put my ignorance to the side and decided to help.

      whereas some individuals may have radical beliefs but are not members of a radical movement, and do not carry out violent actions.

    2. I began to realize that if a small group of people do something bad then they do not represent the entire group of people.

      Practicing unconditional other acceptance, people accept that sometimes people do exceptionally bad things, as the terrorist and suicide bombers do, but still they are not what they do.

    1. I began to realize that if a small group of people do something bad then they do not represent the entire group of people

      Practicing unconditional other acceptance, people accept that sometimes people do exceptionally bad things, as the terrorist and suicide bombers do, but still they are not what they do.

    2. I would tell him the same statement as the men in truck who were beating him and at that moment I felt that I was the same. I was never raised to watch violence happen against innocent people so I put my ignorance to the side and decided to help.

      whereas some individuals may have radical beliefs but are not members of a radical movement, and do not carry out violent actions.

  20. Apr 2019
    1. Our culture is defined by the music we listen to, and the way it is portrayed in the media. Every culture around the world has a different style of song or dance that represents their traditions. Culture can not only be changed through popular songs, but is best represented through music. One of the best ways to understand a foreign culture is by listening to the music that is favorable among the people whose culture you are trying to understand. Music is one of the most powerful forms of art between cultures.

      Music has the power to redefine cultures. We can see this through generational differences between song preferences. For example, American country music back in the late 1900s has a much different feel and style compared to country music now in 2019. While keeping within the same genre, this style of music touches upon different subjects, and uses different instruments, sounds and lyrics. Even early hip-hop has evolved from its beginnings. Hip-hop music is considered the most popular music as of right now, but it has not always been that way. Each generation favors different types of genres of music, and it is clear which backgrounds over the years have favored certain genres of music. As much as music can differentiate cultures, and generations, music can bring people of completely different background together by its artistic flavor and general popularity throughout the mainstream media.

  21. Jan 2019
    1. Most progress will instead occur as annotations on the article text. Articles already contain live links to referenced articles, and future annotations could, for example, indicate the level of support for a particular point, or flag citations to retracted articles.

      Wonderful to see thinking in this direction. I'm thinking many layers of annotations for different purposes--both human and machine readable.

  22. Oct 2018
  23. Feb 2018
    1. songs

      All that I have given up to this let them serve as examples of the way in which the Connaught peasant puts his love-thoughts into song and verse, whether it be hope or despair, grief or joy, that affect him. (147)

      In these final lines of the book, the reader is offered Hyde’s selection of songs as a faithful and complete insight into vernacular Connacht song about the theme of love. Moreover, Hyde suggests that in reading this anthology one achieves a good degree of familiarity with an idealized, essentially native ‘Connaught peasant’.

      Although speakers in the songs are variously male and female, and the reasons for separation from absent lovers differ, the experience of love is fairly uniform throughout. It is a sore experience of unrealized desire. That scenario produces a pronouncedly virtuous image of the ‘Connaught peasant’ for a number of reasons.

      The reader encounters deep loyalty where admiration is unstinted by forbiddance of love because of emigration, lack of requital, or death. ‘Úna Bhán,’ for example, is preceded by a long passage explaining how deeply a bereaved lover missed the fair Úna after, until he himself passed away. Also, Hyde’s anthology is particularly rich in its examples of similes drawn from the natural world. See ‘my love is of the colour of the blackberries’ (5) in ‘If I Were to Go West’, ‘I would not think the voice of a thrush more sweet’ (27) in ‘Long I Am Going,’ and ‘My love is like the blossom of the sloe on the brown blackthorn’ (31) in ‘An Droighneán Donn’. In the vivid rendering of these images, the beauty of the desired lover is stressed, and the delicate sensibility of the speaker is inherently implied. The Connaught peasant is thoroughly valorized as a result.

      Accounting for consistencies among what anthologies include, and among what they exclude, can highlight their organizing agenda. One obvious example in the area of Irish Studies is the Field Day Anthology controversy, detailed in depth by Caitríona Crowe in The Dublin Review: https://thedublinreview.com/article/testimony-to-a-flowering/

      In the case of Hyde’s Love Songs, consistencies among excluded material strengthen our perception of how actively he sought to contrive an estimable image of the Connaught peasant. Though Hyde claims his selection is emblematic of the love-thought of that idealized personage, he does not provide any examples of la chanson de la malmariée. This variety of song is so widespread that Seán Ó Tuama, who was the principal authority on the theme of love in Irish folksong, included it as one of five major genres in his article ‘Love in Irish Folksong’ (in the book Repossessions: Selected Essays on the Irish Literary Heritage. Such songs are an expression of grief by a young woman unhappily married to an elderly man.

      If we are to view the songs anthologized by Hyde in a broader context of Connacht songs about love, an awareness of the chanson de la malmariéé is required. Faoi Rothaí na Gréine (1999) is a relatively recently published collection of Connacht songs. The collecting work was done in Galway between 1927 and 1932 by Máirtín Ó Cadhain, and latterly edited by Professor Ríonach Uí Ógáin. ‘An Droigheán Donn’, ‘Úna Bhán’, and ‘Mal Dubh an Ghleanna’ are common to Faoi Rothaí na Gréine and Love Songs of Connacht. The inclusion in the former of two famous songs of the malmariée genre, ‘Dar Mo Mhóide Ní Phósfainn Thú’ (I Swear I Wouldn’t Marry You), and ‘Amhrán an Tae’ (The Tea Song) demonstrate the strong presence of that genre in the ‘love-thought’ of vernacular Connacht song.

      This way of framing discussion of Love Songs of Connacht invites close interrogation of Hyde’s biases. The choice of material for inclusion and exclusion is ideologically cohesive, to the specific end of creating a valorous image of the idealized native peasant. In my M.A. thesis, I might further refine the line of argument pursued in this annotation, and use it as the basis on which to build a discussion of Hyde’s particular ideological motivations.

    1. Search alphabetically by song title

      This website provides important context for the exploration of a research question I am addressing in my M.A. thesis preparation.

      The portrayal of female personages in revivalist literature sets them in signally passive roles. This is most clearly at issue in the work of that period’s two foremost dramatists. In W.B. Yeats’ Cathleen Ni Houlihane, the female protagonist does not pursue her own course of action, but rather serves to inspire male heroism (P.J. Mathews discusses the play’s portrayal of female passivity at length in a piece, see http://www.rte.ie/centuryireland/index.php/articles/literature-and-1916). In The Only Jealously of Emer and The Countess Cathleen the value of women to society is achieved through acts of self-sacrifice for the benefit of significant male others (Christina Wilson has argued similar points in great detail: http://chrestomathy.cofc.edu/documents/vol5/wilson.pdf).

      In John Millington Synge’s Riders to the Sea, we encounter a blending of the taste for passive female characters with a revival fascination with the rural west. Old Maurya’s reticence and stern faith in God, following the drowning of her five sons, established her as the moral centre of her native Aran community. Her monologue in the play’s ending concentrates our attention on the community’s willingness to surrender to tragic fate, which is always threatened by the danger of the sea (the play is available to read online at this link: http://www.one-act-plays.com/dramas/riders_to_the_sea.html).

      What is interesting to me is that images of a massive female subject, favoured by Abbey playwrights who sought to stress the cultural specificity of Ireland, differ strongly with some prominent portrayals of the female subject in vernacular literature in Irish. In my annotation of this archive, I will provide examples of some genres of folk song – composed by females, and traditionally sung by female singers – that contradict ideas of a female subject as passive sufferer of fate. Annotations will include translations to English.

      After highlighting these features of oral literature in Irish, I will have laid down substantial grounding for a discussion of the ideological motivations of revivalist authors’ depiction of female subjects. It is interesting that certain tropes of a national identity, which these authors consciously sought to create, can be seen as divergent with realities of the social group which was most fundamental to that identity. This observation encourages consideration of European intellectual currents which might have influenced revivalist writers, romantic nationalism in particular.

  24. Feb 2017
  25. Jan 2017
  26. Oct 2016
  27. Dec 2015
  28. edwardtufte.github.io edwardtufte.github.io
    1. Tufte’s style is known for its simplicity, extensive use of sidenotes, tight integration of graphics with text, and carefully chosen typography.

      CSS style dla pięknych artykółów

  29. Oct 2015
    1. The articles obtained to review Trick Your Brain into Thrift by Paying with Cash by Crack Articles is a theory that can be held at both ends. The articles provided have several brushed details of numerous researches that have been done that links the psychological human being into using credits card. Vis versa there is not much details on how to make, trick, or psychologically change one’s mind into purchasing with cash. The psychological research lead to how one views cash and a credit card or how the individual’s emotions are effected by their economic stand point when making purchases. The types of sources influence by the credit card companies to encouraging the public into using their credit card are endless, but the top mechanism used today is earning money back while spending. A real soother to human ear, when one does not like to see cash disappear from their wallet. Acknowledging, the basis of the title that Cracked Article uses is clearly avoiding using cash. The title shouldn’t be Trick Your Brain into Thrift by Paying with Cash, but the Tricks Your Brain Uses to Have You Pay with Credit Cards or When Not to Shop to Be Thrift.