358 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2024
    1. We have, as a bedrock value in our society, long agreed on thevalue of open access to information, and recognize the problems thatarise with attempts to restrict access to and development of knowledge.

      Many academics and modern people may think this way, but it is far from a "bedrock value".

      In many indigenous cultures knowledge was carefully sectioned and cordoned off.

      And as we know that knowledge itself is power (ipsa scientia potestas est - Francis Bacon) many people have frequently cordoned off access to information.

  2. Jan 2024
    1. ZK II note 9/8b 9/8b On the general structure of memories, see Ashby 1967, p. 103 . It is then important that you do not have to rely on a huge number of point-by-point accesses , but rather that you can rely on relationships between notes, i.e. references , that make more available at once than you would with a search impulse or with one thought - has fixation in mind.

      This underlies the ideas of songlines and oral mnemonic practices and is related to Vannevar Bush's "associative trails" in As We May Think.

      Luhmann, Niklas. “ZK II Zettel 9/8b.” Niklas Luhmann-Archiv, undated. https://niklas-luhmann-archiv.de/bestand/zettelkasten/zettel/ZK_2_NB_9-8b_V.

    1. Instance methods Instances of Models are documents. Documents have many of their own built-in instance methods. We may also define our own custom document instance methods. // define a schema const animalSchema = new Schema({ name: String, type: String }, { // Assign a function to the "methods" object of our animalSchema through schema options. // By following this approach, there is no need to create a separate TS type to define the type of the instance functions. methods: { findSimilarTypes(cb) { return mongoose.model('Animal').find({ type: this.type }, cb); } } }); // Or, assign a function to the "methods" object of our animalSchema animalSchema.methods.findSimilarTypes = function(cb) { return mongoose.model('Animal').find({ type: this.type }, cb); }; Now all of our animal instances have a findSimilarTypes method available to them. const Animal = mongoose.model('Animal', animalSchema); const dog = new Animal({ type: 'dog' }); dog.findSimilarTypes((err, dogs) => { console.log(dogs); // woof }); Overwriting a default mongoose document method may lead to unpredictable results. See this for more details. The example above uses the Schema.methods object directly to save an instance method. You can also use the Schema.method() helper as described here. Do not declare methods using ES6 arrow functions (=>). Arrow functions explicitly prevent binding this, so your method will not have access to the document and the above examples will not work.

      Certainly! Let's break down the provided code snippets:

      1. What is it and why is it used?

      In Mongoose, a schema is a blueprint for defining the structure of documents within a collection. When you define a schema, you can also attach methods to it. These methods become instance methods, meaning they are available on the individual documents (instances) created from that schema.

      Instance methods are useful for encapsulating functionality related to a specific document or model instance. They allow you to define custom behavior that can be executed on a specific document. In the given example, the findSimilarTypes method is added to instances of the Animal model, making it easy to find other animals of the same type.

      2. Syntax:

      Using methods object directly in the schema options:

      javascript const animalSchema = new Schema( { name: String, type: String }, { methods: { findSimilarTypes(cb) { return mongoose.model('Animal').find({ type: this.type }, cb); } } } );

      Using methods object directly in the schema:

      javascript animalSchema.methods.findSimilarTypes = function(cb) { return mongoose.model('Animal').find({ type: this.type }, cb); };

      Using Schema.method() helper:

      javascript animalSchema.method('findSimilarTypes', function(cb) { return mongoose.model('Animal').find({ type: this.type }, cb); });

      3. Explanation in Simple Words with Examples:

      Why it's Used:

      Imagine you have a collection of animals in your database, and you want to find other animals of the same type. Instead of writing the same logic repeatedly, you can define a method that can be called on each animal instance to find similar types. This helps in keeping your code DRY (Don't Repeat Yourself) and makes it easier to maintain.

      Example:

      ```javascript const mongoose = require('mongoose'); const { Schema } = mongoose;

      // Define a schema with a custom instance method const animalSchema = new Schema({ name: String, type: String });

      // Add a custom instance method to find similar types animalSchema.methods.findSimilarTypes = function(cb) { return mongoose.model('Animal').find({ type: this.type }, cb); };

      // Create the Animal model using the schema const Animal = mongoose.model('Animal', animalSchema);

      // Create an instance of Animal const dog = new Animal({ type: 'dog', name: 'Buddy' });

      // Use the custom method to find similar types dog.findSimilarTypes((err, similarAnimals) => { console.log(similarAnimals); }); ```

      In this example, findSimilarTypes is a custom instance method added to the Animal schema. When you create an instance of the Animal model (e.g., a dog), you can then call findSimilarTypes on that instance to find other animals with the same type. The method uses the this.type property, which refers to the type of the current animal instance. This allows you to easily reuse the logic for finding similar types across different instances of the Animal model.

      Certainly! Let's go through each part and explain it in simple terms: ### 1. `this` in Mongoose: - **What is `this`?** In JavaScript, `this` refers to the current context or object. In Mongoose, particularly within methods and middleware functions, `this` represents the instance (document) the function is currently operating on. - **Why is it used?** `this` is used to access and modify the properties of the current document. For example, in a Mongoose method, `this` allows you to refer to the fields of the specific document the method is called on. ### 2. Example: Let's use the `userSchema.pre("save", ...)`, which is a Mongoose middleware, as an example: ```javascript userSchema.pre("save", async function (next) { if (!this.isModified("password")) { next(); } else { this.password = await bcrypt.hash(this.password, 10); next(); } }); ``` - **Explanation in Simple Words:** - Imagine you have a system where users can sign up and set their password. - Before saving a new user to the database, you want to ensure that the password is securely encrypted (hashed) using a library like `bcrypt`. - The `userSchema.pre("save", ...)` is a special function that runs automatically before saving a user to the database. - In this function: - `this.isModified("password")`: Checks if the password field of the current user has been changed. - If the password is not modified, it means the user is not updating their password, so it just moves on to the next operation (saving the user). - If the password is modified, it means a new password is set or the existing one is changed. In this case, it uses `bcrypt.hash` to encrypt (hash) the password before saving it to the database. - The use of `this` here is crucial because it allows you to refer to the specific user document that's being saved. It ensures that the correct password is hashed for the current user being processed. In summary, `this` in Mongoose is a way to refer to the current document or instance, and it's commonly used to access and modify the properties of that document, especially in middleware functions like the one demonstrated here for password encryption before saving to the database.

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  3. Dec 2023
    1. for security, app access token should never be hard-coded into client-side code, doing so would give everyone who loaded your webpage or decompiled your app full access to your app secret, and therefore the ability to modify your app. This implies that most of the time, you will be using app access tokens only in server to server calls.
    2. once you have an access token you can use it to make calls from a mobile client, a web browser, or from your server to Facebook's servers. If a token is obtained on a client, you can ship that token down to your server and use it in server-to-server calls. If a token is obtained via a server call, you can also ship that token up to a client and then make the calls from the client.
    3. A User access token is used if your app takes actions in real time, based on input from the user. This kind of access token is needed any time the app calls an API to read, modify or write a specific person's Facebook data on their behalf. A User access tokens is generally obtained via a login dialog and requires a person to permit your app to obtain one.
  4. Sep 2023
  5. Aug 2023
  6. Jul 2023
    1. In many cases, all or some of an author'sworks included in this set were unavailable.

      One of the primary goals of The Great Books, was to make some of the (especially ancient writers) more accessible to modern audiences with respect to ready availability of their works which were otherwise much more expensive.

      This certainly says something about both publishing and reading practices of the early 20th century.

  7. Jun 2023
    1. Are protected members/fields really that bad? No. They are way, way worse. As soon as a member is more accessible than private, you are making guarantees to other classes about how that member will behave. Since a field is totally uncontrolled, putting it "out in the wild" opens your class and classes that inherit from or interact with your class to higher bug risk. There is no way to know when a field changes, no way to control who or what changes it. If now, or at some point in the future, any of your code ever depends on a field some certain value, you now have to add validity checks and fallback logic in case it's not the expected value - every place you use it. That's a huge amount of wasted effort when you could've just made it a damn property instead ;) The best way to share information with deriving classes is the read-only property: protected object MyProperty { get; } If you absolutely have to make it read/write, don't. If you really, really have to make it read-write, rethink your design. If you still need it to be read-write, apologize to your colleagues and don't do it again :) A lot of developers believe - and will tell you - that this is overly strict. And it's true that you can get by just fine without being this strict. But taking this approach will help you go from just getting by to remarkably robust software. You'll spend far less time fixing bugs.

      In other words, make the member variable itself private, but can be abstracted (and access provided) via public methods/properties

    2. Public and/or protected fields are bad because they can be manipulated from outside the declaring class without validation; thus they can be said to break the encapsulation principle of object oriented programming.
    3. Using a property or a method to access the field enables you to maintain encapsulation, and fulfill the contract of the declaring class.
    4. Exposing properties gives you a way to hide the implementation. It also allows you to change the implementation without changing the code that uses it (e.g. if you decide to change the way data are stored in the class)
  8. May 2023
  9. Apr 2023
    1. Given the broad aim of the right of access, the aim of the right of access is notsuitable to be analysed as a precondition for the exercise of the right of accessby the controller as part of its assessment of access requests. Thus, controllersshould not assess “why” the data subject is requesting access, but only “what”the data subject is requesting (see section 3 on the analysis of the request) andwhether they hold personal data relating to that individual (see section 4).Therefore, for example, the controller should not deny access on the groundsor the suspicion that the requested data could be used by the data subject todefend themselves in court in the event of a dismissal or a commercial disputewith the controller9.

      This is very interesting, and the FT (Copies du dossier médical) case will be one to watch.

      Details: https://www.dpcuria.eu/details?reference=C-307/22

    1. Recommended Resource

      I recommend adding the webpage "Open Access in Australia" on Wikiwand that documents Australia's history for accepting and promoting open access and open publication in its country.

      The site contains a timeline that documents key years in which the open movement, open access, open government, and open data concepts were introduced. The year that CC Australia was established is included in the timeline.

    1. **Recommend Resource: ** Under the "More Information About Other Open Movements" I recommended adding Higashinihon Daishinsai Shashin Hozon Purojekuto, (trans. Great Earthquake of Eastern Japan Photo Archiving Project) which is one of Japan's open government and open data efforts to document all photographs about Japan's 2011 earthquake.

      The site currently contains close to 40,000 photographs of the aftermath of the natural disaster.

      The photos are hosted by Yahoo! Japan and are published under non-commercial clause for open access to the public.

  10. Feb 2023
    1. Where information that a controller would otherwise be required to provide to a datasubject pursuant to subsection (1) includes personal data relating to another individualthat would reveal, or would be capable of revealing, the identity of the individual, thecontroller—(a)shall not, subject to subsection (8), provide the data subject with the informationthat constitutes such personal data relating to the other individual, and(b)shall provide the data subject with a summary of the personal data concernedthat—(i)in so far as is possible, permits the data subject to exercise his or her rightsunder this Part, and

      There's a right to provide a summary where it would be hard to avoid revealing the identity of another individual.

    2. Subsection (1) shall not apply—(a)in respect of personal data relating to the data subject that consists of anexpression of opinion about the data subject by another person given inconfidence or on the understanding that it would be treated as confidential, or(b)to information specified in paragraph (b)(i)(III)of that subsection in so far as arecipient referred to therein is a public authority which may receive data in thecontext of a particular inquiry in accordance with the law of the State.

      Access doesn't need to include opinions made in confidence, or information obtained by a public authority who recieves data in the context of a particular inquiry.

    1. If you close the report without explicitly clearing the filters, Access remembers them and you can click Toggle Filter again to reapply them next time you open the report. This works even if you close and reopen the database. However, if you click Home > Advanced > Clear All Filters, Access clears the filters completely and you’ll need to start from scratch next time around.

      Interesting to know how Access saves the filter you wrote.

    1. Searching is the #1 task that a user has to do. I will say this again:Searching is the #1 task that a user has to do.

      Keep reading. Maybe this has to do with server filtering. I don't know. But it seems interesting so ...

    1. In the example(s), Mypass is a SQL pass-through query you created. You simply create one working PT query, and then you can (usually) then use that one PT query anytime you want raw T-SQL or to run a store procedure 100% server side. So we are in effect overwriting and re-using that one PT query anytime we want raw SQL to run server side.

      This tells how Access has changed over the years and how different it is from the version I worked with ages ago.

    2. Now for running and executing store procedures, or say a sql update to “many” rows, then you most certainly want to use a pass through query, since processing of records does occur local client side.

      So, it's important to research and learn about pass-through queries.

    3. And AGAIN a SIMPLE USE of the “where” clause will result in sql server view ONLY sending down records that meet the criteria you set via the Access built in “where” clause.

      So, building the where clause when opening forms/report is one of the best ways to go.

    4. So placing forms! Expressions inside of a query always been a bad idea since then the query is now “married” to some silly form.

      Wouldn't myself imagined this. But it's very the very truth. The query becomes attached to the form. You can not use it anywhere else!!! And this is the way I was doing this ...

    5. You can change the SQL string in the pass-through QueryDef and specify the Form field:

      So, this is a way to execute that query on the sql server side. Would it be difficult to implement?

    6. Second, would be to pass a SQL string from Access to SQL Server (pass-through query) and have it execute on the SQL Server side.

      Ok, so we need to do some research about pass-trhrough queries. Do they execute on the server?

    7. You can make these changes 100% inside of Access, and not have to really use anything SQL server side to achieve this goal.

      This is just wonderful. Just need to work on the Access (client) side. No need to affect the server side (always more difficult to work with)

    1. WhereCondition Optional Variant A string expression that's a valid SQL WHERE clause without the word WHERE.

      According to what I read, this Where clause goes to the server and applies there. So, we just have to do what we do in js: open a filter form first, build a filter from there and then open the form with that filter (with no Where word).

      Doing that, it's sql server who picks up that filter and applies it server side!!! Just what we need ...

    1. Essentially, sorting and filtering are tools that let you organize your data. When you sort data, you are putting it in order. Filtering data lets you hide unimportant data and focus only on the data you're interested in.

      Some inputs about sorting and filtering in an Access Database.

  11. Jan 2023
    1. But that’s just one way to get batteries into low-income customers’ homes. Sunrun also acts as a third-party owner of solar and battery systems that Grid Alternatives installs for customers that can’t or don’t want to borrow money to finance it. Third-party owners can monetize the value of federal tax credits for low-income households that don’t pay a large enough federal tax bill to take advantage of the credits themselves. 

      This feels like the project partner thing from before - income households can't access the support themselves, so you need an intermediary to arrange someone with a tax bill to recude, and presumably take a cut in the process.

    2. Participants will get zero-interest loans to finance the equipment and installation costs, plus monthly credits in exchange for allowing MCE to tap that equipment to reduce its need to buy high-priced energy during the peak hours of 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. The program is open to households that currently lack rooftop solar as well as households that have already had solar installed by Grid Alternatives and want to take advantage of that self-generated power to heat their homes or charge their cars, said Alexandra McGee, MCE’s manager of strategic initiatives.

      If it's cheaper to deploy batteries in low income communities than build peakers, then the flipside is that they have to accept less reliable power. At this way communities are compensated, though I guess?

  12. Dec 2022
  13. Nov 2022
    1. Any MSU Libraries public service desk

      Should this be more specific, now that the main library really only has one public service desk?

  14. Oct 2022
    1. En cas de non-respect de la Loi, la Commission d’accès à l’information pourra imposer des sanctionsimportantes, qui pourraient s’élever jusqu’à 25 M$ ou à 4 % du chiffre d’affaires mondial. Cette sanctionsera proportionnelle, notamment, à la gravité du manquement et à la capacité de payer de l’entreprise.ENTREPRISES
  15. Aug 2022
  16. Jul 2022
  17. Jun 2022
    1. We are the leading independent Open Access publisher in the Humanities and Social Sciences in the UK: a not-for-profit Social Enterprise run by scholars who are committed to making high-quality research freely available to readers around the world. All our books are available to read online and download for free, with no Book Processing Charges (BPCs) for authors. We publish monographs and textbooks in all areas, offering the academic excellence of a traditional press combined with the speed, convenience and accessibility of digital publishing. We also publish bespoke Series for Universities and Research Centers and invite libraries to support Open Access publishing by joining our Membership Programme.
    1. Hypothesis can now offer social annotation in more places for more students — adding over 16 million VitalSource users in more than 240 countries — across a vast new quantity of content: over a million texts from over a thousand publishers available in the Bookshelf platform.

      This growth in content to annotate and talk about is awesome!

  18. Apr 2022
    1. A complaint more specific to the quantity of books was articulated in 1522 by the jurist Giovanni Nevizzano of Asti (d. 1540) who observed that the great number of available books made it hard to find the books one needed. Proper selection among the many books available was crucial because “if a scholar does not have the books required for his subject, he does not enjoy the privi-leges of a scholar.”20

      This same sort of quote is often repeated in the present while vitiating against the corporate publishers who own most of research publishing and charge for it dearly.

  19. Mar 2022
    1. Of two editions that I have been involved with, Volume One of The Collected Works of John Ford now costs £222.50, while Volume One of The Oxford Francis Bacon sells at £322.50. These prices have increased since publication in 2012 at rates exceeding any measure of inflation, and have reached a level that no individual, and ever fewer libraries, can afford. They are so expensive that fewer copies are being sent out for review, which means that fewer readers will hear about them. The claim that “Oxford University Press advances knowledge and learning” is undermined by its policy on pricing. Editors who devote years of their lives to producing accurate and helpful texts are disappointed that their chances of reaching a scholarly audience are diminishing.
  20. Feb 2022
    1. I think that making sure the apps and website we use are accessible to everyone is really important. I liked how this reading broke down the different levels in terms language accessibility and internet access. Sometimes I think teachers can overlook that aspect and accidentally have students trailing behind.

  21. Jan 2022
  22. Dec 2021
    1. student advocates are pushing back in the court of public opinion. Inclusiveaccess.org is a new website that counters the publishers' disinformation campaign and advocates for a fair deal on textbooks. https://www.inclusiveaccess.org/
  23. Nov 2021
    1. Modern browsers that support the File System Access API (Edge and Chrome today) allow web pages to access the local file system (with your permission).
    1. If you would like to use Google's cloud to store and sync your Chrome data but you don't want Google to access the data, you can encrypt your synced Chrome data with your own sync passphrase.
  24. Oct 2021
    1. Peers can help you go from No Open Access to some Open Access.

      It's difficult to spread Open Access and Free cultural work licenses if blog posts about Open Access are not compatible with Open Access. The article by Anne Young has a non-commercial restriction. It would be nice to contact Anne Young to propose to release her blog post under CC BY-SA license or anyway under a Free cultural work license.

  25. Sep 2021
    1. Just as normalizing the use of pronouns has been an important step for supporting gender justice, we argue that normalizing access talk is an important step for advancing disability justice in STEM fields. Moreover, we argue that all individuals have access needs, regardless of whether they are disabled or nondisabled.

      normalizing use of sharing and checking access needs.

    1. Remote Access is something that we are really excited about because it will allow our support team to give you a seamless and high level of support that is truly unmatched. When you need extra help, you can enable the Remote Access toggle with a single click. This will send a secure token to the Elegant Themes support staff that they can use to log in to your WordPress Dashboard. No passwords are shared and there is no need to send the token to our team yourself. It all works seamlessly in the background. While remote access is enabled, our team will be able to log in to your website and help explore whatever problems you are experiencing. You can even enable it preemptively before chatting with our support team so that we can jump right in if necessary. By default, our support staff will have limited access to your website using a custom WordPress support role. You can also enable full admin access if requested. Remote access is automatically disabled after 4 days, or when you disable Divi. You can also turn it off manually after an issue has been resolved, and of course, Remote Access can only be enabled by you, the website owner, and not by Elegant Themes or anyone else. The Remote Access system is wonderful because it saves tons of time during support chat, and it saves you the hassle of having to debug certain complicated issues yourself. It allows us to take a hands on approach to solving problems quickly, instead of wasting hours or days chatting back and forth.
  26. Jul 2021
    1. Blogging about your work hits both of those marks. It also means that you have to translate your work from academese to language that non-academics will understand (i.e. jargon) and also foreground the relevance of your work. You have to tell people why your work is important and what it adds to the world.

      This is such an important point. Donald Trump did such an excellent job speaking at a level a lay person could understand when downplaying the seriousness of the Covid-19 virus thus undermining the scientific and medical community voices, that many Americans are refusing to vaccinate. This puts the world at risk for future variants that might be much worse than the ones we have now. More academics simplifying knowledge will help stem the tide of fake news, political propaganda and truly harmful misinformation.

  27. Jun 2021
  28. May 2021
    1. Lawrence Gostin. (2021, April 30). Insightful talk by @doctorsoumya @P4HR webinar on #VaccinePassports @WHO is developing smart Int’l Vaccine Certificates Proof of vac Confidential & Secure Open Access Interoperable But @WHO doesn’t support requiring vacs for int’l travel until the world is more equal [Tweet]. @lawrencegostin. https://twitter.com/lawrencegostin/status/1388215713328943104

  29. Apr 2021
  30. Mar 2021
    1. Schoch-Spana, M., Brunson, E. K., Long, R., Ruth, A., Ravi, S. J., Trotochaud, M., Borio, L., Brewer, J., Buccina, J., Connell, N., Hall, L. L., Kass, N., Kirkland, A., Koonin, L., Larson, H., Lu, B. F., Omer, S. B., Orenstein, W. A., Poland, G. A., … White, A. (2020). The public’s role in COVID-19 vaccination: Human-centered recommendations to enhance pandemic vaccine awareness, access, and acceptance in the United States. Vaccine. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.10.059

  31. Feb 2021
    1. "Open access" refers to toll-free or gratis access to content

      not necessarily free content

    2. Open access refers to online research outputs that are free of all restrictions on access (e.g. access tolls) and free of many restrictions on use (e.g. certain copyright and license restrictions).
  32. Dec 2020
    1. Associação de Direitos Reprográficos

      Entidade sem fins lucrativos responsável por, entre outras coisas, defender "os direitos de autor dos seus associados, seja por meio de medidas judiciais, seja por meio de medidas extrajudiciais", segundo a Lei Federal nº. 9.610, de 19 de fevereiro de 1998 (conhecida como a Lei de Direitos Autorais).

      Entretanto, existe um debate acerca do artigo 46 desta lei. Segundo o texto,

      *Não constitui ofensa aos direitos autorais:

      d) de obras literárias, artísticas ou científicas, para uso exclusivo de deficientes visuais, sempre que a reprodução, sem fins comerciais, seja feita mediante o sistema Braille ou outro procedimento em qualquer suporte para esses destinatários;

      II - a reprodução, em um só exemplar de pequenos trechos, para uso privado do copista, desde que feita por este, sem intuito de lucro;*

      O ponto é: o que significa exatamente "pequenos trechos"? A própria ABDR parece também não ter muita ideia. Segundo o site da instituição, na área de Perguntas frequentes, consta a seguinte informação:

      A Lei de Direitos Autorais não define o que é “pequeno trecho” de uma obra, tampouco trata de porcentagem quando menciona pequeno trecho. **É importante frisar que pequeno trecho é um fragmento da obra que não contempla sua substância. “Pequeno trecho” não se refere à extensão da reprodução, mas sim ao conteúdo reproduzido.** Assim, qualquer intenção de se associar o “pequeno trecho” a 10 ou 15% da totalidade de uma obra não tem fundamento. Isto porque é possível que em 10 ou 15% de uma reprodução esteja contemplada parte substancial da obra protegida.

      Em todo caso, ainda que o trecho que se pretenda reproduzir possa ser objeto de consenso como sendo “pequeno trecho”, esta é apenas uma das hipóteses especificadas no artigo 46, II, da Lei de Direitos Autorais. Sendo necessário a presença conjunta de todas as condições estabelecidas nesse dispositivo legal para haver a limitação do direito de autor – tais como: a reprodução em um só exemplar, a reprodução para uso privado do copista e feita por ele, e a reprodução sem intuito de lucro.*

      Uma afirmação um tanto subjetiva. Tão subjetiva quanto a ideia de lucro associado à aprendizagem e ao conhecimento científico.

    1. Following the model of open-source software, we can enter our ideas and expressions into public discourse

      This also isn't a well-aligned argument. Articles published in a for-profit journal are entered into the public discourse (although obviously not into the public domain). Unless public means "without cost", which I don't think it does.

      We might want to broaden this to include open-access, which is specific to publication models.

  33. Nov 2020
    1. “Let’s say a trial is listed and I have to cross examine a witness,” he said. “Now, what is the guarantee that the witness would be willing to go all the way to the court in such a time?” If witnesses do not appear, then the matter would merely be adjourned.

      access to justice

  34. Oct 2020
    1. Mr Dutton will renew his attack on Facebook and other companies for moving to end-to-end encryption, saying it will hinder efforts to tackle online crime including child sexual abuse.This month, Australia joined its "Five-Eyes" intelligence partners – the United States, Britain, New Zealand and Canada – along with India and Japan, in signing a statement calling on tech companies to come up with a solution for law enforcement to access end-to-end encrypted messages.

      Countering child exploitation is an extremely important issue. It's a tough job and encryption makes it harder. But making encryption insecure is counter intuitive and has negative impacts on digital privacy. So poking a hole in encryption, while it can assist with countering child exploitation, can also inadvertently be helping, for example, tech-enabled domestic abuse.

      Hopefully DHA understands this and thus have thrown it back at the tech companies to come up with a solution for law enforcement.

    1. If you define a variable outside of your form, you can then set the value of that variable to the handleSubmit function that 🏁 React Final Form gives you, and then you can call that function from outside of the form.