81 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2023
    1. there are some sources of energy which  which create a negative value because of   00:48:39 of of global climate change and climate working  and warming and you know all the negative   external effect of using some energy so we have  some to make some of the energy uh sources just   illegal you know we have to keep some of the oil  in the ground we have to stop looking for new oil   and gas so you know so the solution to some of  the of the energy questions we have is just to to   00:49:04 to make illegal you know the use of certain energy  and to to to move to other energy so that's part   of the answer now if we if we have done that  and we deal with with energy that don't have the   the negative this much bigger negative impact  on mankind than their positive productive impact   then you know redistribution of wealth must be  about all forms of wealth you know whether it's   00:49:32 rent or energy or financial assets or i  was seeing you know we we need to have a   permanent circulation of wealth and power so you  know that's the way i i view you know taxation of   wealth is will be a permanent you know progressive  tax on net wealth which in effect will will will   wipe out all the biggest uh wealth right away you  know say up to 90 percent tax per year for you   00:49:59 know for for billionaires but among you know there  will still be some people who want 100 000 dollars   some people who earn 1 million or 2 million but  there will be a permanent circulation of wealth   holdings within within this limited uh wealth  gap that that will still exist and this should   be for all forms of wealth you know whether it's  land or housing or whatever whatever the origin

      !- Thomas Piketty : On redistribution of all forms of wealth - concerning energy, certain harmful forms of energy such as fossil fuels need to be phased out and made illegal due to their harmful effects - ALL forms of wealth, whether financial, energy, housing, needs to be progressively taxed and redistributed equitably. So a billionaire would pay 90 percent tax per year but there will still be a range of wealth...up to millionaires for instance.

  2. Oct 2022
    1. Goutor only mentions two potential organizational patterns for creating output with one's card index: either by chronological order or topical order. (p34) This might be typical for a historian who is likely to be more interested in chronologies and who would have likely noted down dates within their notes.

  3. Jul 2022
    1. We have already stated that all social forms come into existence out of the encoding and decodingof cognitive selections out of a symbolic medium.

      !- in other words : social forms * social forms only have symbolic reality

    1. https://www.zylstra.org/blog/2022/06/spring-83/

      I've been thinking about this sort of thing off and on myself.

      I too almost immediately thought of Fraidyc.at and its nudge at shifting the importance of content based on time and recency. I'd love to have a social reader with additional affordances for both this time shifting and Ton's idea of reading based on social distance.

      I'm struck by the seemingly related idea of @peterhagen's LindyLearn platform and annotations: https://annotations.lindylearn.io/new/ which focuses on taking some of the longer term interesting ideas as the basis for browsing and chewing on. Though even here, one needs some of the odd, the cutting edge, and the avant garde in their balanced internet diet. Would Spring '83 provide some of this?

      I'm also struck by some similarities this has with the idea of Derek Siver's /now page movement. I see some updating regularly while others have let it slip by the wayside. Still the "board" of users exists, though one must click through a sea of mostly smiling and welcoming faces to get to it the individual pieces of content. (The smiling faces are more inviting and personal than the cacophony of yelling and chaos I see in models for Spring '83.) This reminds me of Stanley Meyers' frequent assertion that he attempted to design a certain "sense of quiet" into the early television show Dragnet to balance the seeming loudness of the everyday as well as the noise of other contemporaneous television programming.

      The form reminds me a bit of the signature pages of one's high school year book. But here, instead of the goal being timeless scribbles, one has the opportunity to change the message over time. Does the potential commercialization of the form (you know it will happen in a VC world crazed with surveillance capitalism) follow the same trajectory of the old college paper facebook? Next up, Yearbook.com!

      Beyond the thing as a standard, I wondered what the actual form of Spring '83 adds to a broader conversation? What does it add to the diversity of voices that we don't already see in other spaces. How might it be abused? Would people come back to it regularly? What might be its emergent properties?

      It definitely seems quirky and fun in and old school web sort of way, but it also stresses me out looking at the zany busyness of some of the examples of magazine stands. The general form reminds me of the bargain bins at book stores which have the promise of finding valuable hidden gems and at an excellent price, but often the ideas and quality of what I find usually isn't worth the discounted price and the return on investment is rarely worth the effort. How might this get beyond these forms?

      It also brings up the idea of what other online forms we may have had with this same sort of raw experimentation? How might the internet have looked if there had been a bigger rise of the wiki before that of the blog? What would the world be like if Webmention had existed before social media rose to prominence? Did we somehow miss some interesting digital animals because the web rose so quickly to prominence without more early experimentation before its "Cambrian explosion"?

      I've been thinking about distilled note taking forms recently and what a network of atomic ideas on index cards look like and what emerges from them. What if the standard were digital index cards that linked and cross linked to each other, particularly in a world without adherence to time based orders and streams? What does a new story look like if I can pull out a card either at random or based on a single topic and only see it or perhaps some short linked chain of ideas (mine or others) which come along with it? Does the choice of a random "Markov monkey" change my thinking or perspective? What comes out of this jar of Pandora? Is it just a new form of cadavre exquis?

      This standard has been out for a bit and presumably folks are experimenting with it. What do the early results look like? How are they using it? Do they like it? Does it need more scale? What do small changes make to the overall form?


      For more on these related ideas, see: https://hypothes.is/search?q=tag%3A%22spring+%2783%22

  4. Jun 2022
    1. Writers diverge by collecting raw material for the story they wantto tell, sketching out potential characters, and researching historicalfacts.

      Missing here is the creative divergence of creating plot points which could be later connected. This part of the process is incredibly difficult for many as seen in the poor second act development in most of narrative history. Beginnings and endings are usually incredibly easy, but the middle portions for connecting the two is incredibly hard.

      Is this because creating connections between the ends when there no intervening ideas to connect is nearly impossible? How can one brainstorm middle plot points so that they might be more easily connected?

  5. Feb 2022
  6. Dec 2021
    1. reap’d

      To collect crop. Contraction of "reaped."

    2. bourn

      A small stream. Usually with this form, referring to the hills covered in chalk in southern England.

    3. moss’d

      In Middle-English, verbs in their past tense forms sometimes lose the vowel in the ending. Here, "mossed" becomes "moss'd."

    4. brimm’d

      In Middle-English, verbs in their past tense forms sometimes lose the vowel in the ending. Here, "brimmed" becomes "brimm'd."

    5. o’er

      The contraction of "over" is used in order to comply with poetic meter.

    6. bourn

      A small stream. Usually with this form, referring to the hills covered in chalk in southern England.

    7. moss’d

      In Middle-English, verbs in their past tense forms sometimes lose the vowel in the ending. Here, "mossed" becomes "moss'd."

    8. brimm’d

      In Middle-English, verbs in their past tense forms sometimes lose the vowel in the ending. Here, "brimmed" becomes "brimm'd."

    9. o’er

      The contraction of "over" is used in order to comply with poetic meter.

    10. reap’d

      To collect crop. Contraction of "reaped."

    11. moss’d

      In Middle-English, verbs in their past tense forms sometimes lose the vowel in the ending. Here, "mossed" becomes "moss'd."

    12. brimm’d

      In Middle-English, verbs in their past tense forms sometimes lose the vowel in the ending. Here, "brimmed" becomes "brimm'd."

    13. o’er

      The contraction of "over" is used in order to comply with poetic meter.

    1. What is the state? the authors ask. Not a single stable package that’s persisted all the way from pharaonic Egypt to today, but a shifting combination of, as they enumerate them, the three elementary forms of domination: control of violence (sovereignty), control of information (bureaucracy), and personal charisma (manifested, for example, in electoral politics).
  7. Nov 2021
    1. It may seem unreasonable to distinguish the Great Wanderings (Troy toKalypso's island) from the Homecoming (Kalypso's island to Ithaka). The reasonfor the distinction is Homer's way of recounting these two stages. The GreatWanderings are told by Odysseus in the first person; the Homecoming by thepoet in his own person. This makes a great difference. For instance, whenOdysseus is made to report divine intervention unseen by him, he has to find aplausible explanation (xii.389-390); when the poet tells the story in his ownperson, he can do as he pleases. Thus the change of technique, if nothing else,puts the two stages of wandering on different levels.

      Interesting to note this shift in narrative style. How can one interpret this from the perspective of orality versus literacy?

    1. { target: { value } }

      This might seem confusing at first glance. However this is just simple "nested destructruing" and "smart function parameters" used together

      Read the "Nested Destructuring" and "Smart Function Parameters" sections from the link below to get a better idea of what's going on.

      https://javascript.info/destructuring-assignment#object-destructuring

      the set() function can also be written as -----

      let set = (name) => {
          return ( (e) => {
              setDetails( {...details , [ name ] : e.target.value });
              console.log(details);
          })
      }
      

      notice how the predeclared variable name is being used as a key in the object. { [name] : value } NOT { name : value}. Skipping the box brackets will throw you an error This is because name is actually a variable. Similar to the way in which we use object[key] = value; notation to add a k-v pair, we have to use { [name] : value } ie. enclose the variable name in square brackets while creating an object using object literal syntax to make sure that the code works

  8. Oct 2021
  9. Jun 2021
    1. "Dear Jenny: What am I working on? How is it going?

      I love that after the break, he brings it back around to something from the beginning to close things out nicely. Something done by the best writers and usually the best comedians).

      Create some context, then use that context to your advantage.

  10. May 2021
    1. these form handlers demonstrate that you can easily add dynamic behavior to your static site. The next time you decide that a static site is a bad choice for your use case, take a moment and consider: should your web frontend be responsible for this feature, or can you use some imagination and technical know-how to get the best of both worlds?
  11. Mar 2021
    1. The reason Final Form does this is so that pristine will be true if you start with an uninitialized form field (i.e. value === undefined), type into it (pristine is now false), and then empty the form field. In this case, pristine should return to true, but the value that the HTML DOM gives for that input is ''. If Final Form did not treat '' and undefined as the same, any field that was ever typed in would forever be dirty, no matter what the user did.
  12. Feb 2021
    1. array :translations do hash do string :locale string :name end end array inputs can only have one input nested underneath them. This is because every element of the array must be the same type. And the inputs nested inside arrays cannot have names because they would never be used.
    1. @conference_form.submit(conference_params)

      Surprised they called it submit, since that could imply that you're triggering an action called submit.

      They use other verbs to describe this:

      • sync
      • populate
      • write

      Analogous to Reform's sync / sync_models method.

      Actually, the name makes a lot of sense when you see it in context:

          @conference_form = ConferenceForm.new(conference)
          @conference_form.submit(conference_params)
      
          if @conference_form.save
      
    1. Of course our object doesn't have any contacts yet, so our controller will need to make sure that the form has at least one fields_for block to render by giving it one on initialization
    1. cultural capital

      Introduced by Pierre Bourdieu in the 1970s, the concept has been utilized across a wide spectrum of contemporary sociological research. Cultural capital refers to ‘knowledge’ or ‘skills’ in the broadest sense. Thus, on the production side, cultural capital consists of knowledge about comportment (e.g., what are considered to be the right kinds of professional dress and attitude) and knowledge associated with educational achievement (e.g., rhetorical ability). On the consumption side, cultural capital consists of capacities for discernment or ‘taste’, e.g., the ability to appreciate fine art or fine wine—here, in other words, cultural capital refers to ‘social status acquired through the ability to make cultural distinctions,’ to the ability to recognize and discriminate between the often-subtle categories and signifiers of a highly articulated cultural code. I'm quoting here from (and also heavily paraphrasing) Scott Lash, ‘Pierre Bourdieu: Cultural Economy and Social Change’, in this reader.

  13. Oct 2020
    1. Note that the fields are kept in a flat structure, so a "deep" field like "shipping.address.street" will be at the key "shipping.address.street", with the dots included.
    1. Mine requires that dirty and pristine be "calculated properties".
    2. This is a philosophical issue, I think. People (and presumably form libraries) have different definitions of what "dirty" means. Yours: "The field has ever been edited" Mine: "The value of the field is different from the initial value"
    3. Personally, I rather like the idea of typing into a field, backspacing to undo what you just typed, and having the field (and form) go back to being pristine. Aside from that aesthetic difference, my definition has the practical implication that it lets you know if you need to save the record or not.
    4. We could potentially have another flag that was your definition of dirty, but then we run into the hard problem in computer science: naming things.
    1. Warnings, in this example, are defined as: suggestions to the user, like validation errors, but that do not prevent submission.
    1. In general it is recommended you handle forms in this "controlled" manner. In some cases it might make sense to manage the form state outside of Solid via refs. These "uncontrolled" forms can also work. Just be conscious of the difference as mixing approaches can lead to unexpected results.
  14. Sep 2020
    1. Proving to myself that isValid does correctly change to true even when a key in $errors is an array.

  15. Jul 2020
  16. Jun 2020
  17. May 2020
    1. The main use of schemas is to define forms that can be edited through the admin interface.
  18. Apr 2020
    1. There are few ways to build forms with objects that don't inherit from Active Record, as follows:
  19. Jan 2020
  20. Oct 2019
  21. Aug 2019
  22. May 2019
    1. But like its usual in the case of Observable-based APIs, FRP techniques can help easily implement many use cases that would otherwise be rather hard to implement such as: pre-save the form in the background at each valid state, or even invalid (for example storing the invalid value in a cookie for later use) typical desktop features like undo/redo

      key point on why FRP is good: misc usages on each 'state' change in the form - record and save state for 'undo' feature, save to local storage to be recovered later, etc

    2. This is why this is called template-driven forms, because both validation and binding are all setup in a declarative way at the level of the template.

      key point on naming of 'template-driven forms'

    3. You are probably wondering what we gained here. On the surface there is already a big gain: We can now unit test the form validation logic

      key point - advantage of reactive forms is the testability of its validation

  23. Jan 2019
    1. intervening in so many disparate "content" areas, this historyalso offers a wealth of divergent structural possibilities for rhetoric.

      Here, is the author suggesting that the different forms or structures of rhetoric compete or can be at odds with each another?

  24. Oct 2018
  25. Sep 2018
  26. Sep 2017
    1. protocol available at doi: 10.7910/DVN/V1TKIO20

      kudos for citing (rather than just mentioning) the dataset and especially for including the consent forms (they are in Study_protocol.docx)

    1. Elizabeth’s discontent stems from the way that she grafts individual choice onto social forms. Marriage, for Elizabeth, should not be defined by its being an omnipresent social form; it should be made meaningful by the intentions behind it.

      Moe aptly presents her argument again, as she argues that Elizabeth's frustration with Charlotte, for example, has to do with her own issues managing her frustration with "social forms." Moe allows the reader to "fill in the blank" here, as the reader can use this piece of information to better understand Elizabeth's reaction to Charlotte--her frustration is in Charlotte's refusal to resist the social forms that inherently oppress women and impact the emotional aspect of marriage. By giving her reader room to make this judgement herself, Moe's argument consequently becomes more concrete.

  27. Feb 2017
    1. This awakens the idea that, in addition to the leaves, there exists in nature the "leaf': the original model according to which all the leaves were perhaps woven, sketched, measured, col· ored, curled, and painted-but by incompetent hands, so that no specimen has turned out to be a correct, trustworthy, and faithful likeness of the original model.

      Does this almost harken back to Plato's Theory of Forms, or the idea that a perfect and original realization of a thing exists in a higher form beyond our grasp? Can we only see and know shadows of a thing (in this case, a leaf) and mere copies of our perception of that thing?

  28. Jun 2016
    1. Three different kinds of capital guided the authors through the the analysis, including-human, social and cultural capital.
  29. Feb 2016
  30. Sep 2015
    1. The spatial order, including the built environment, is not only the product of classificatory collective representations based on social forms but also a model for reproducing the social forms themselve

      Are we allowing the technology we use to build around us reform the way society interacts with itself and its surroundings?

  31. Nov 2013
    1. Their senses nowhere lead to truth; on the contrary, they are content to receive stimuli and, as it were, to engage in a groping game on the backs of things.

      Easily entertained and distracted in a battle of egos on the surface of "forms"

    2. They are deeply immersed in illusions and in dream images; their eyes merely glide over the surface of things and see "forms."

      Plato's shadow cave.

    3. They are deeply immersed in illusions and in dream images; their eyes merely glide over the surface of things and see "forms."

      This reminds me of Plato, and illusion of what is real but not the real knowledge.