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  1. Last 7 days
    1. Diagnostic categories based on clinical consensus fail to align with findings emerging from clinical neuroscience and genetics.

      -clinical consensus: science is something you vote for.

  2. Nov 2022
    1. A quick and dirty guide to choosing "slow carbs" (low GLI) and "fast carbs" (high GLI). Purportedly, insulin spikes (from high GLI foods) and prevent amino acids from entering the blood brain barrier. Need to fact-check this

    1. phytoncides, antibacterial and antimicrobial substances that trees and other plants release into the air to help them fight diseases and harmful organisms. When humans breathe in these substances—typically by spending time in nature—their health can improve. Across several studies, phytoncides have been shown to boost immune function, increase anticancer protein production, reduce stress hormones, improve mood, and help people relax. 

      I always feel better during and after a forest walk.

    1. The actual reward state is not one where you're lazing around doing nothing. It's one where you're keeping busy, where you're doing things that stimulate you, and where you're resting only a fraction of the time. The preferred ground state is not one where you have no activity to partake in, it's one where you're managing the streams of activity precisely, and moving through them at the right pace: not too fast, but also not too slow. For that would be boring

      Doing nothing at all is boring. When we "rest" we are actually just doing activities that we find interesting rather than those we find dull or stressful.

    2. the work that needs to be done is not a finite list of tasks, it is a neverending stream. Clothes are always getting worn down, food is always getting eaten, code is always in motion. The goal is not to finish all the work before you; for that is impossible. The goal is simply to move through the work. Instead of struggling to reach the end of the stream, simply focus on moving along it.

      This is true and worth remembering. It is very easy to fall into the mindset of "I'll rest when I'm finished"

    1. Goal SettingGoal setting was used by physiotherapists to activate and motivate patients, to determine what meaningful therapy would be for the patient and to set discharge limits (Leach, Cornwell, Fleming, and Haines, 2010Leach E, Cornwell P, Fleming J, Haines T 2010 Patient centered goal-setting in a subacute rehabilitation setting Disability and Rehabilitation 32: 159–172. [Taylor & Francis Online], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]; Pashley et al, 2010Pashley E, Powers A, McNamee N, Buivids R, Piccinin J, Gibson BE 2010 Discharge from outpatient orthopaedic physiotherapy: A qualitative descriptive study of physiotherapists’ practices Physiotherapy Canada 62: 224–234. [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]; Rindflesch, 2009Rindflesch AB 2009 A grounded-theory investigation of patient education in physical therapy practice Physiotherapy Theory and Practice 25: 193–202. [Taylor & Francis Online], [Google Scholar]; Thomson, 2008Thomson D 2008 An ethnographic study of physiotherapists’ perceptions of their interactions with patients on a chronic pain unit Physiotherapy Theory and Practice 24: 408–422. [Taylor & Francis Online], [Google Scholar]). Goal setting seemed particular of physiotherapists’ interest, as patients did not spontaneously mention goal setting as important for patient-centered physiotherapy. Patient-centered physiotherapists, however, tried to allow the patients to define their own goals in collaboration (Larsson, Liljedahl, and Gard, 2010Larsson I, Liljedahl K, Gard G 2010 Physiotherapists’ experience of client participation in physiotherapy interventions: A phenomenographic study Advances in Physiotherapy 12: 217–223. [Taylor & Francis Online], [Google Scholar]; Pashley et al, 2010Pashley E, Powers A, McNamee N, Buivids R, Piccinin J, Gibson BE 2010 Discharge from outpatient orthopaedic physiotherapy: A qualitative descriptive study of physiotherapists’ practices Physiotherapy Canada 62: 224–234. [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]; Thomson, 2008Thomson D 2008 An ethnographic study of physiotherapists’ perceptions of their interactions with patients on a chronic pain unit Physiotherapy Theory and Practice 24: 408–422. [Taylor & Francis Online], [Google Scholar]; Trede, 2000Trede FV 2000 Physiotherapists’ approaches to low back pain education Physiotherapy 86: 427–433. [Crossref], [Google Scholar]). This was done by facilitating them and guiding them, using education and dialogue to determine the patients’ goals (Larsson, Liljedahl, and Gard, 2010Larsson I, Liljedahl K, Gard G 2010 Physiotherapists’ experience of client participation in physiotherapy interventions: A phenomenographic study Advances in Physiotherapy 12: 217–223. [Taylor & Francis Online], [Google Scholar]; Leach, Cornwell, Fleming, and Haines, 2010Leach E, Cornwell P, Fleming J, Haines T 2010 Patient centered goal-setting in a subacute rehabilitation setting Disability and Rehabilitation 32: 159–172. [Taylor & Francis Online], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]; Rindflesch, 2009Rindflesch AB 2009 A grounded-theory investigation of patient education in physical therapy practice Physiotherapy Theory and Practice 25: 193–202. [Taylor & Francis Online], [Google Scholar]; Thomson, 2008Thomson D 2008 An ethnographic study of physiotherapists’ perceptions of their interactions with patients on a chronic pain unit Physiotherapy Theory and Practice 24: 408–422. [Taylor & Francis Online], [Google Scholar]; Trede, 2000Trede FV 2000 Physiotherapists’ approaches to low back pain education Physiotherapy 86: 427–433. [Crossref], [Google Scholar]). Goals were mostly created in collaboration between the physiotherapist and the patient (Leach, Cornwell, Fleming, and Haines, 2010Leach E, Cornwell P, Fleming J, Haines T 2010 Patient centered goal-setting in a subacute rehabilitation setting Disability and Rehabilitation 32: 159–172. [Taylor & Francis Online], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]; Trede, 2000Trede FV 2000 Physiotherapists’ approaches to low back pain education Physiotherapy 86: 427–433. [Crossref], [Google Scholar]). However, some physiotherapists made no or little mention of patient-centered goals (Pashley et al, 2010Pashley E, Powers A, McNamee N, Buivids R, Piccinin J, Gibson BE 2010 Discharge from outpatient orthopaedic physiotherapy: A qualitative descriptive study of physiotherapists’ practices Physiotherapy Canada 62: 224–234. [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]).

      Interesting point that patients do not spontaneously mention goal setting. How does this impact on your understanding of what patients value? If you reframe or guide the conversation to explore goals, will the patient feel heard? or managed?

    2. Communicative abilities of a patient-centered physiotherapist meant being receptive to what the patient has to say, correctly interpreted, and giving explanations in a way patients understand (Fleiss and Cohen, 1973Fleiss JL, Cohen J 1973 The equivalence of weighted kappa and the intraclass correlation coefficient as measures of reliability Educational and Psychological Measurement 33: 613–619. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]; Trede, 2000Trede FV 2000 Physiotherapists’ approaches to low back pain education Physiotherapy 86: 427–433. [Crossref], [Google Scholar]). Purposefully changing communication styles depending on the patient (Hiller, Guillemin, and Delany, 2015Hiller A, Guillemin M, Delany C 2015 Exploring healthcare communication models in private physiotherapy practice Patient Education and Counseling 98: 1222–1228. [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]). Having the ability to explain in lay terms, directly speaking to the patient, listening, and asking appropriate questions were of importance (Cooper, Smith, and Hancock, 2008Cooper K, Smith BH, Hancock E 2008 Patient-centredness in physiotherapy from the perspective of the chronic low back pain patient Physiotherapy 94: 244–252. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]; Kidd, Bond, and Bell, 2011Kidd MO, Bond CH, Bell ML 2011 Patients’ perspectives of patient-centredness as important in musculoskeletal physiotherapy interactions: A qualitative study Physiotherapy 97: 154–162. [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]; Pashley et al, 2010Pashley E, Powers A, McNamee N, Buivids R, Piccinin J, Gibson BE 2010 Discharge from outpatient orthopaedic physiotherapy: A qualitative descriptive study of physiotherapists’ practices Physiotherapy Canada 62: 224–234. [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]; Potter, Gordon, and Hamer, 2003Potter M, Gordon S, Hamer P 2003 The physiotherapy experience in private practice: The patients’ perspective Australian Journal of Physiotherapy 49: 195–202. [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]).
    3. Personal communication and communication skills were far more important than the provision of scientific facts (Trede, 2000Trede FV 2000 Physiotherapists’ approaches to low back pain education Physiotherapy 86: 427–433. [Crossref], [Google Scholar]). By personal communication, a bond was established and the therapy shifted from therapist to patient centered (Hiller, Guillemin, and Delany, 2015Hiller A, Guillemin M, Delany C 2015 Exploring healthcare communication models in private physiotherapy practice Patient Education and Counseling 98: 1222–1228. [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]).

      communication far more important that provision of scientific facts

    4. Figure 2. Proposed framework for patient-centeredness in physiotherapy.

      proposed framework for patient centredness in physiotherapy

    1. McAllister et al. highlighted the importance of the clinical consultation as a conversation, paced and directed by both participants [5McAllister M, Matarasso B, Dixon B, et al. Conversation starters: re-examining and reconstructing first encounters within the therapeutic relationship. J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2004;11:575–582. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2850.2004.00763.x [Crossref], [PubMed], [Google Scholar]]. Sacks et al. maintain that people take turns to talk by following a set of conventional rules that assign speaker time and direction, and any deviation could indicate a person's attempt to display power, status or influence [6Sacks H, Schegloff EA, Jefferson G. A simplest systematics for the organization of turn-taking for conversation. Language. 1974;50(4):696–735. doi: 10.1353/lan.1974.0010 [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]]. Interruptions may not simply be a reflection of status or dominance however, they may reflect a speaker's enthusiasm, interest or spontaneity [22Irish JT, Hall JA. Interruptive patterns in medical visits: the effects of role, status and gender. Soc Sci Med. 1995;41(6):873–881. doi: 10.1016/0277-9536(94)00399-E [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]]. Furthermore, it is important they are not interpreted as signs of power, control or dominance, rather they are indicative of interpersonal relationships, such as neutrality, power or rapport [39Goldberg JA. Interrupting the discourse on interruptions. J Pragmat. 1990;14:883–903. doi: 10.1016/0378-2166(90)90045-F [Crossref], [Google Scholar]], which is particularly pertinent to healthcare where power differentials prevail. This was seen in the current study, both in theme 3, and when the patient interjects with humour in the penultimate quote. Practical guides to clinical communication skills concur with Sacks’ model and the two most important skills have been identified as: the ability to allow the patient to speak without interruption; and the ability to truly hear what the patient is trying to say [40Jackson C. Shut up and listen. A brief guide to clinical communication skills. Dundee: Dundee University Press; 2006; p. 1. [Google Scholar]].

      power in the clinical conversation.

      Practical guides to clinical communication skills concur with Sacks’ model and the two most important skills have been identified as: the ability to allow the patient to speak without interruption; and the ability to truly hear what the patient is trying to say [40Jackson C. Shut up and listen. A brief guide to clinical communication skills. Dundee: Dundee University Press; 2006; p. 1. [Google Scholar] ].

    2. McAllister et al. highlighted the importance of the clinical consultation as a conversation, paced and directed by both participants [5McAllister M, Matarasso B, Dixon B, et al. Conversation starters: re-examining and reconstructing first encounters within the therapeutic relationship. J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2004;11:575–582. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2850.2004.00763.x [Crossref], [PubMed], [Google Scholar]]. Sacks et al. maintain that people take turns to talk by following a set of conventional rules that assign speaker time and direction, and any deviation could indicate a person's attempt to display power, status or influence [6Sacks H, Schegloff EA, Jefferson G. A simplest systematics for the organization of turn-taking for conversation. Language. 1974;50(4):696–735. doi: 10.1353/lan.1974.0010 [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]]. Interruptions may not simply be a reflection of status or dominance however, they may reflect a speaker's enthusiasm, interest or spontaneity [22Irish JT, Hall JA. Interruptive patterns in medical visits: the effects of role, status and gender. Soc Sci Med. 1995;41(6):873–881. doi: 10.1016/0277-9536(94)00399-E [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]]. Furthermore, it is important they are not interpreted as signs of power, control or dominance, rather they are indicative of interpersonal relationships, such as neutrality, power or rapport [39Goldberg JA. Interrupting the discourse on interruptions. J Pragmat. 1990;14:883–903. doi: 10.1016/0378-2166(90)90045-F [Crossref], [Google Scholar]], which is particularly pertinent to healthcare where power differentials prevail. This was seen in the current study, both in theme 3, and when the patient interjects with humour in the penultimate quote. Practical guides to clinical communication skills concur with Sacks’ model and the two most important skills have been identified as: the ability to allow the patient to speak without interruption; and the ability to truly hear what the patient is trying to say [40Jackson C. Shut up and listen. A brief guide to clinical communication skills. Dundee: Dundee University Press; 2006; p. 1. [Google Scholar]].

      Practical guides to clinical communication skills concur with Sacks’ model and the two most important skills have been identified as: the ability to allow the patient to speak without interruption; and the ability to truly hear what the patient is trying to say [40Jackson C. Shut up and listen. A brief guide to clinical communication skills. Dundee: Dundee University Press; 2006; p. 1. [Google Scholar] ].

    3. Clinical implicationsTo the best of our knowledge, this is the first time the prevalence and nature of overlaps and interruptions have been reported in patients presenting with low back pain. This work has highlighted the complexity of evaluating the impact of communication during clinical encounters. Clinicians need to ensure that the pendulum of current clinical practice does not swing towards pathoanatomy and physiology, biomechanics and technological advances at the expense of treating the patient as a person and providing truly patient-centred care. Therefore, clinicians at the forefront of practice, whatever their profession, need to invest time evaluating and developing their own communication skills (for example by audio-recording consultations or engaging in peer observation, with patients’ consent) to optimize non-specific treatment effects and ultimately enhance patients’ experience and outcomes.

      noting the importance of taking time to evaluate and develop your clinical communication skills.

    1. Whilst this study intended to explore participants’ perceptions of the impact of empathy on a clinical encounter, participants focused their discussion on how the attributes of both the clinician and patient, as well as external factors, could affect the delivery of empathy during a clinical encounter. Participants identified building rapport, active listening, verbal and non-verbal communication to be factors that could influence the patient-clinician relationship, which is supported in the literature, alongside empathy which has been shown to affect the patient-clinician relationship, improving clinical outcomes, diagnoses and adherence to therapy [3Hojat M, Mangione S, Kane G, et al. Relationships between scores of the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSPE) and the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI). Med Teach. 2005;27(7):625–628. doi: 10.1080/01421590500069744 [Taylor & Francis Online], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar],8–12Beck R, Daughtbridge R, Sloane P. Physician-patient communication in the primary care office: a systematic review. J Am Board Fam Med. 2002;15(1):25–38. [Google Scholar]Hojat M, Gonnella J, Nasca T, et al. Physician empathy: definition, components, measurement, and relationship to gender and specialty. Am J Psychiat. 2002;159(9):1563–1569. doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.159.9.1563 [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]Shapiro J, Morrison E, Boker J. Teaching empathy to first year medical students: evaluation of an elective literature and medicine course. Educ Health: Change in Learn Practice. 2004;17(1):73–84. doi: 10.1080/13576280310001656196 [Crossref], [PubMed], [Google Scholar]Stepien K, Baernstein A. Educating for empathy. J Gen Intern Med. 2006;21(5):524–530. doi: 10.1111/j.1525-1497.2006.00443.x [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]Rakel D, Barrett B, Zhang Z, et al. Perception of empathy in the therapeutic encounter: effects on the common cold. Patient Educ Couns. 2011;85(3):390–397. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2011.01.009 [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]].

      This paragraph mentions one of the key skills from the health coaching conversation module. - note relevance to practice

    2. The key finding from this study indicates that teaching empathy per se, may be best done when working in a clinical setting, as clinicians are able to draw on their clinical experience and immediately take new ideas into their clinical encounters to further enhance their skills. Whilst methods of developing empathy in students have been shown to be successful [16Brunero S, Lamont S, Coates M. A review of empathy education in nursing. Nurs Inq. 2010;17(1):65–74. doi: 10.1111/j.1440-1800.2009.00482.x [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar],20Bombeke K, Van Roosbroeck S, De Winter B, et al. Medical students trained in communication skills show a decline in patient-centred attitudes: an observational study comparing two cohorts during clinical clerkships. Patient Educ Couns. 2011;84(3):310–318. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2011.03.007 [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar],21Batt-Rawden S, Chisolm M, Anton B, et al. Teaching empathy to medical students. Acad Med. 2013;88(8):1171–1177. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0b013e318299f3e3 [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar],27Fernández-Olano C, Montoya-Fernández J, Salinas-Sánchez A. Impact of clinical interview training on the empathy level of medical students and medical residents. Med Teach. 2008;30(3):322–324. doi: 10.1080/01421590701802299 [Taylor & Francis Online], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar],31Lim B, Moriarty H, Huthwaite M. “Being-in-role”: a teaching innovation to enhance empathic communication skills in medical students. Med Teach. 2011;33(12):e663–e669. doi: 10.3109/0142159X.2011.611193 [Taylor & Francis Online], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar],33–36Bayne H. Training medical students in empathic communication. J Spec Group Work. 2011;36:316–329. doi: 10.1080/01933922.2011.613899 [Taylor & Francis Online], [Google Scholar]Norfolk T, Birdi K, Walsh D. The role of empathy in establishing rapport in the consultation: a new model. Med Educ. 2007;41:690–697. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2923.2007.02789.x [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]Das Gupta S, Charon R. Personal illness narratives: using reflective writing to teach empathy. Acad Med. 2004;79:351–356. doi: 10.1097/00001888-200404000-00013 [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]Tiuraniemi J, Läärä R, Kyrö T, et al. Medical and psychology students’ self-assessed communication skills: a pilot study. Patient Educ Couns. 2011;83:152–157. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2010.05.013 [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]], the increase in empathy levels has not been shown to have a carry over longer than 7 days following the intervention,[16Brunero S, Lamont S, Coates M. A review of empathy education in nursing. Nurs Inq. 2010;17(1):65–74. doi: 10.1111/j.1440-1800.2009.00482.x [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar],35Das Gupta S, Charon R. Personal illness narratives: using reflective writing to teach empathy. Acad Med. 2004;79:351–356. doi: 10.1097/00001888-200404000-00013 [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]]. Multiple studies, however, have identified a decrease in empathy levels in medical and healthcare students over the duration of their education [6Nunes P, Williams S, Sa B, et al. A study of empathy decline in students from five health disciplines during their first year of training. Int J Med Educ. 2011;2:12–17. doi: 10.5116/ijme.4d47.ddb0 [Crossref], [Google Scholar],16Brunero S, Lamont S, Coates M. A review of empathy education in nursing. Nurs Inq. 2010;17(1):65–74. doi: 10.1111/j.1440-1800.2009.00482.x [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar],19Hojat M, Vergare M, Maxwell K, et al. The devil is in the third year: a longitudinal study of erosion of empathy in medical school. Acad Med. 2009;84(9):1182–1191. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181b17e55 [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar],20Bombeke K, Van Roosbroeck S, De Winter B, et al. Medical students trained in communication skills show a decline in patient-centred attitudes: an observational study comparing two cohorts during clinical clerkships. Patient Educ Couns. 2011;84(3):310–318. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2011.03.007 [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar],23Sherman J, Cramer A. Measurement of changes in empathy during dental school. J Dent Educ. 2005;69(3):338–345. [Crossref], [PubMed], [Google Scholar]], and in a review of these studies [24Neumann M, Edelhäuser F, Tauschel D, et al. Empathy decline and its reasons: a systematic review of studies with medical students and residents. Acad Med. 2011;86(8):996–1009. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0b013e318221e615 [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]], the authors identified four possible reasons for this: negative experiences with clinical supervisors; a feeling of vulnerability as a student, resulting in reduced self-confidence; a lack of social support and increased workload combined with long clinical placement hours [24Neumann M, Edelhäuser F, Tauschel D, et al. Empathy decline and its reasons: a systematic review of studies with medical students and residents. Acad Med. 2011;86(8):996–1009. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0b013e318221e615 [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]]. The student physiotherapists in this study stated that there were multiple factors to focus on whilst on clinical placement, and that their focus was more on their personal development and academic grades rather than their focus being on empathising and communicating with patients. Students did however acknowledge the importance of empathic communication during clinical encounters, but deemed other aspects of their education to be a priority. Neumann et al. [24Neumann M, Edelhäuser F, Tauschel D, et al. Empathy decline and its reasons: a systematic review of studies with medical students and residents. Acad Med. 2011;86(8):996–1009. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0b013e318221e615 [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]] report similar findings, with medical students’ empathy levels showing a significant decline at the point that they enter clinical practice during their educational programme, due to their focus on academic work, improving clinical skills and lack of time to relax and de-stress.

      barriers for students developing and practicing skills in communication and empathy

    1. We’re dedicated to providing the highest standards of safety to protect you and your family during your visit to Founders Family Medicine. We screen all patients for COVID-19 symptoms. We also require masks and social distancing at our clinic.

      We’re dedicated to providing the highest standards of safety to protect you and your family during your visit to Founders Family Medicine. We screen all patients for COVID-19 symptoms. We also require masks and social distancing at our clinic.

  3. Oct 2022
    1. Anxiety Makes Me Feel Like I am Losing My MindAnxiety, Mental Health, Therapy, Treatment<img width="550" height="321" src="https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/anxiety-makes-me-feel-like-i-am-losing-my-mind-550x321.jpg.webp" class="attachment-entry_with_sidebar size-entry_with_sidebar wp-post-image" alt="i feel like i&#039;m losing my mind" /> Table of Contents Help! Anxiety Makes Me Feel Like I am Losing My MindI Feel Like I’m Losing My MindDifferent Types of Anxiety DisordersHow to Manage AnxietyHolistic Therapies That Help Manage StressElevation Behavioral Health Provides Expert Treatment for Anxiety  Help! Anxiety Makes Me Feel Like I am Losing My Mind Anxiety can be so hard to live with. Constant worry and stress keep you in a state of constant fight-or-flight mode at the slightest little trigger. You may try to reason with yourself, that the stress triggers are no big deal. Your brain, though, is locked and loaded to take you through the spectrum of anxiety symptoms. You just can’t seem to break the stress cycle. Many who approach a doctor with their complaints about their symptoms have truly suffered. They are seeking ways to manage the stress so they can live a normal, happy life. This goal is very possible to reach with the right treatment plan. Anxiety treatment can help reduce when you find yourself expressing am I losing my mind and help reduce the daily struggle and greatly improve your life. <img class="alignright wp-image-28337" src="https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/losingmind.jpg.webp" alt="i'm losing my mind" width="300" height="634" srcset="https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/losingmind.jpg.webp 568w,https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/losingmind-142x300.jpg.webp 142w,https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/losingmind-488x1030.jpg.webp 488w,https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/losingmind-334x705.jpg.webp 334w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />I Feel Like I’m Losing My Mind Anxiety disorder is a broad grouping of mental health disorders, each with excess worry or fear driving it. Anxiety disorders are very common, with 40 million people struggling with one each year. This disorder is different from the common fear you might feel before having to make a public speech. We all have felt afraid from time to time, like when we are pushed out of our comfort zone. Anxiety disorders, though, are very intrusive. Constant stress can be so difficult to manage that it impacts one’s lifestyle, career, health, and friendships. What It Feels Like On one hand, when someone suffers from this problem, something will trigger a cascade of symptoms. There are many types of anxiety and each has its own unique features. The basic anxiety symptoms include: Feelings of dread and fear. Always being on alert for danger. Racing heart. Shaking. Sweating. Fast breathing. Shortness of breath, holding one’s breath. Stomach upset, diarrhea. Feeling jumpy or restless. Insomnia. Headaches. Different Types of Anxiety Disorders There are varied ways that anxiety is expressed. For this reason, there are six types of mental health disorders. The anxiety spectrum includes: Generalized anxiety disorder: GAD features constant worry for much of the day. This can result in headaches, muscle tension, nausea, and trouble thinking. Panic disorder: Sudden and unexplained feelings of intense terror. This can cause a racing heart, shortness of breath, nausea, chest pain, feeling out of my mind, dizzy. May lead to social isolation to avoid having an attack. Social anxiety: Intense fear of being judged or critiqued. Fear of being embarrassed in public. Causes social isolation. Specific phobias: Irrational fear of a certain thing, place, or situation. To manage this fear, the person will go to great measures to avoid triggers. Trauma disorder: PTSD is about never getting over trauma, even months later, It can lead to avoidance of people, places, or situations that trigger thoughts of the event. Flashbacks, nightmares, or repeated thoughts of the trauma stoke the symptoms. Obsessive-compulsive disorder: OCD involves worries about things like germs, causing harm, or a need for order. This drives compulsive behaviors in an attempt to manage the symptoms of anxiety caused by the fear. How to Manage Anxiety Do the symptoms of anxiety make you feel like you’re losing your mind? If so, it is time to meet with a mental health worker. At the first meeting, a therapist will assess what type of anxiety you are dealing with. We Can Help! Call Now! (888) 561-0868 He or she will then design a treatment plan that will help you manage the symptoms. The treatment uses a combined approach with psychotherapy, drugs, and healthy actions that help to reduce stress. Therapy for anxiety is based on the type you have. CBT is very helpful for people that struggle with excess worry and fear. It also helps you to notice how your thoughts are driving the panic-type response to a trigger. CBT then guides you toward changing those fear-based thoughts into more positive ones. Once the thoughts are reframed, the actions that follow will also be positive. Anti-anxiety drugs from the benzo group can be helpful for some people. These drugs work swiftly to help calm nerves and relax you. In some cases, antidepressants are used to treat anxiety as well. <img class="alignright wp-image-28339" src="https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/maninmirror.jpg.webp" alt="feel like i'm losing my mind" width="300" height="634" srcset="https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/maninmirror.jpg.webp 568w,https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/maninmirror-142x300.jpg.webp 142w,https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/maninmirror-488x1030.jpg.webp 488w,https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/maninmirror-334x705.jpg.webp 334w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /> Holistic Therapies That Help Manage Stress Holistic therapy self-care for stress actions is now often found in the treatment plan for anxiety. This is because these activities can help improve the treatment outcome. They do this by teaching patients ways to achieve a relaxed state of being. For instance, some of these include: Yoga. Mindfulness. Deep breathing Acupuncture. Massage therapy. Equine therapy. Art therapy Elevation Behavioral Health Provides Expert Treatment for Anxiety  Elevation Behavioral Health is an upscale residential mental health treatment center in Los Angeles. If you feel like anxiety makes you feel like you’re losing your mind, our caring team of experts can help. It is time to seek the treatment you deserve to regain your quality of life. When your outpatient treatment is not giving the results you desire, consider a residential program. Treatment is much more focused, and the home-like setting gives you a chance to heal. Take a break from the stressors or triggers in your daily life. Enjoy our upscale private home and gorgeous setting. Our team will help guide you back to health and wellbeing. For questions about our program, reach out to us today at (888) 561-0868. November 22, 2020/by Elevation Behavioral HealthTags: am i losing my mind, feel like im losing my mind, help im losing my mind, i feel like i am losing my mind, i think im losing my mind, losing my mind, losing your mindShare this entryShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on VkShare on RedditShare by Mail https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/anxiety-makes-me-feel-like-i-am-losing-my-mind.jpg 366 550 Elevation Behavioral Health https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/logo_ebh.png Elevation Behavioral Health2020-11-22 01:00:132022-07-08 16:31:14Anxiety Makes Me Feel Like I am Losing My Mind

      When Anxiety is too Much I Feel Like I am Losing My Mind

    1. Can a Narcissist Stop Lying Even With Evidence?Behavior, Mental Health<img width="845" height="321" src="https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/why-do-narcissists-lie-845x321.jpg" class="attachment-entry_with_sidebar size-entry_with_sidebar wp-post-image" alt="why do narcissists lie" /> Table of Contents Why Do Narcissists LieAbout Narcissistic Personality DisorderWhy Someone With NPD LiesLies Often Turn Into GaslightingYou Are the Narcissistic Supply SourceBreaking Free From an NPD LiarElevation Behavioral Health Provides Residential Luxury Mental Health Treatment Why Do Narcissists Lie Are narcissists compulsive liars? Can a narcissist ever stop lying, even when confronted with evidence of their lies? Learn all about narcissistic personality disorder. If you are involved with a narcissist, then you are quite used to being lied to. Their constant lies simply come with the territory. To a normal person, it may be very perplexing to be lied to all the time by someone who purports to care for you. Learn about what the narcissist seems to gain from telling lies all time. About Narcissistic Personality Disorder Narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) is a mental health disorder that stems from an unhealthy and inflated view of self. At least, that’s how it appears on the outside. Inside, though, the NPD really has a very low opinion of him or herself. All of their heinous behaviors are driven by a need to pump themselves up in their own eyes and others’. Individuals with NPD often seek out partners who have certain traits. For instance, they may be a compassionate and sensitive person, but may also be needy and have low self-esteem. Like a leech that latches to a blood source, the NPD latches onto its victim. Over time, the NPD slowly chips away at the victim’s sense of self-worth. Through lies and gaslighting, they put them down and cause them to doubt themselves. Through this emotional abuse, they can control the victim. But because the NPD has no conscience, they never feel regret or remorse for mistreating their partner. Someone with NPD demands constant admiration and praise while keeping their victim from receiving any. A narcissist does not want any competition. Symptoms of NPD include: Lacks empathy or compassion for others. Feels entitled to special treatment. Expects others to fawn over them. Belittles others; talks down to people. Takes advantage of the others’ weaknesses to build themselves up. Self important; arrogant. May hog the conversation. Emotionally detached. Believes that others envy him. Boastful and pretentious. Becomes angry if challenged. Torments the victim with fear. Has a bad temper; sudden angry outbursts. Easily slighted, sensitive to criticism. Doesn’t notice the needs of others. Emotionally stingy. May isolate their victim from friends. Feels insecure inside; self-loathing. Not willing to go to therapy. The NPD will refuse to get help, believing that they are perfect and beyond reproach. Why Someone With NPD Lies Why do narcissists lie… all the time? If you confront them with proof of the lie, they will still attempt to lie their way out of it. What inspires lying? Simply put, the NPD lies in order to inflate his or her own self-esteem. They lie to the other person, to beat them. By inflating truths, they attempt to make their own skills or abilities seem superior to the other person. In other words, they are a boar, the type of person people avoid at a party. We Can Help! Call Now! (888) 561-0868 When the NPD lies, he or she is trying to make themselves appear dominant. They lie for self-gain believing that telling mistruths makes them look smarter than the other person. Having a victim at their side who they can lie to provides them with a constant narcissistic supply, someone that fuels their sickness. When they impress their partner with their lies, they receive a rush or hit to feel better about themselves. Lies Often Turn Into Gaslighting For the NPD, the lies are often a prelude to gaslighting. Gaslighting is a psychological weapon used by some to keep a person emotionally off-balance. When they lie to the person’s face about what may have occurred, they cause the victim to question their own sanity. When the victim confronts the NPD with solid evidence of a misdeed, they will be met with lies. Not only will the NPD lie and deny it ever happened, but they are also likely to attack. This is where the gaslighting begins. They will attempt to twist the event around to become the fault of the victim. You Are the Narcissistic Supply Source There is a reason why the NPD wants to keep their victim around; the victim fulfills a need for them. They fill up their NPD cup daily by sucking the life out of the unsuspecting partner. Thus, the victim is not even aware of the role they play in the illness at first. The NPD will therefore go to great lengths to keep the victim from leaving them. Some tactics they use include: They may cry false tears to elicit sympathy, thus keeping the victim engaged. They may use force or become violent to assert dominance. They may try to manipulate the victim through guilt. They may threaten the victim by taking the money away or causing some type of harm. They make the victim feel bad about themselves so they won’t think they can do any better. They may threaten suicide, although it is an empty threat. Breaking Free From an NPD Liar If you have woken up to realize you are in a relationship with an NPD, you should run, not walk, to the exits. The sad truth is that these people are rarely able to change their ways, mostly because they don’t want to. In their own minds they feel they never do wrong, so why go to therapy? Partner with a therapist who can offer guidance and support as you detach from the NPD. These people can and do become violent when faced with their N-source leaving them. Prepare for the false promises and tears, as they play on your sense of compassion to keep you entrenched in the abuse cycle. So, can a narcissist stop lying, even with evidence of their lies? The answer is very clear: no, they cannot. Elevation Behavioral Health Provides Residential Luxury Mental Health Treatment Elevation Behavioral Health can help someone who is the victim of a narcissist. Our dedicated team is here to guide you toward wellness and discovering new insights. For questions about our program, please call us today at (888) 561-0868. April 27, 2022/by Elevation Behavioral HealthTags: dealing with a narcissist, lying narcissist, narcissist, when narcissist lieShare this entryShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on VkShare on RedditShare by Mail https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/why-do-narcissists-lie.jpg 687 1030 Elevation Behavioral Health https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/logo_ebh.png Elevation Behavioral Health2022-04-27 18:09:152022-04-27 18:09:15Can a Narcissist Stop Lying Even With Evidence?

      Are narcissists compulsive liars? Can a narcissist ever stop lying, even when confronted with evidence of their narcissistic lies? Learn all about narcissistic personality disorder.

    1. Unlike many note taking manuals, Goutor advises that within the small list of rules and standards which he's laid out, one should otherwise default to maximizing the comfort of their note taking system. This may be as small as using one's favorite writing instruments or inks. (p28)

      It's nice to see him centering self-care and small things which contribute to the researchers' mental health within note taking design and user interface.

  4. Sep 2022
    1. Can resetting the body clock help with depression?

      Metadata

      Highlights & Notes

      • “Epidemiological studies suggest that night-shift workers are at [approximately] 25% to 40% higher risk for mental illnesses, including depression and anxiety,”
      • participants’ mood plummeted, and failed to improve during the four days they spent on the reversed schedule
      • circadian misalignment has negative effects even on long-time shift workers
      • sleep problems and circadian disruption are associated with depression
      • more than 90% of people with depression have sleep problems
      • Poor sleep turns out to be not only a symptom but also a predictor.
      • sleep has a protective effect: improving sleep can help to prevent depression in adults.
      • light also has a direct antidepressant effect, through the stimulation of mood-regulating brain centers
      • In the early 1970s, researchers realized that keeping people with depression awake for 36 hours often provided immediate relief of their symptoms.
      • effects of sleep deprivation that were nothing short of “miraculous”.
      • combining sleep deprivation with light therapy and what researchers call sleep phase advance — essentially, going to bed earlier. In a 2009 study, a group including Bunney showed that half of people who underwent this routine remained in remission after seven weeks7.
      • existing treatments for bipolar disorder, lithium and valproic acid, both affect circadian rhythms
      • sleep deprivation and the rapid-acting antidepressant ketamine both cause similar changes in the expression of circadian-related genes
      • eating in synch with typical mealtimes, even if a person’s sleep schedule is altered, can prevent the adverse effects of circadian disruption on mood.
      • recommendations for better ‘light hygiene’, such as getting outside during the morning and limiting artificial light in the hours before bed in the evening
  5. Aug 2022
    1. Mayer says time-restricted eating — a form of intermittent fasting that requires you to squeeze all your daily calories into a compressed feeding window — may be helpful. “The migrating motor complex is rarely mentioned in these articles on intermittent fasting, which is surprising because it’s so well-studied,” he says.To ensure the MMC has enough time to perform its duties, aiming for 14 hours without caloric foods or drinks is a good target, he says. For example, you could avoid all calories between 8 p.m. and 10 a.m. “The 14 hours without food intake would allow the MMC to kick in and not only cleanse your gut of any undigestible, unabsorbable food components, but also to reestablish the normal proximal-to-distal gradient of gut microbial density,” he says.

      !- For : microbiome health - fasting for 14 hours helps the migrating motor complex (MMC) maintain gut health

    1. ReconfigBehSci [@SciBeh]. (2021, December 20). This thread is sobering and informative with respect to what overloading health services means in terms of individual experience...worth popping into google translate fir non-German speakers [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1472983739890348045

    1. Below is a two page spread summarizing a Fast Company.com article about the Pennebaker method, as covered in Timothy Wilson’s book Redirect:

      Worth looking into this. The idea of the Pennebaker method goes back to a paper of his in 1986 that details the health benefits (including mental) of expressive writing. Sounds a lot like the underlying idea of morning pages, though that has the connotation of clearing one's head versus health related benefits.

      Compare/contrast the two methods.

      Is there research underpinning morning pages?

      See also: Expressive Writing in Psychological Science https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1745691617707315<br /> appears to be a recap article of some history and meta studies since his original work.

    1. Patients with limited health literacy are more likely to misunderstand medication instructions and have difficulty demonstrating the correct dosing regimen. Limited health literacy is associated with increased healthcare costs and worse health outcomes, including increased mortality.

      Introduction for Health Literacy

    1. Sit to do computer work. Sit using a height-adjustable, downward titling keyboard tray for the best work posture, then every 20 minutes stand for 8 minutes AND MOVE for 2 minutes. The absolute time isn’t critical but about every 20-30 minutes take a posture break and stand and move for a couple of minutes.  Simply standing is insufficient. Movement is important to get blood circulation through the muscles. And movement is FREE! Research shows that you don’t need to do vigorous exercise (e.g. jumping jacks) to get the benefits, just walking around is sufficient. So build in a pattern of creating greater movement variety in the workplace (e.g. walk to a printer, water fountain, stand for a meeting, take the stairs, walk around the floor, park a bit further away from the building each day).

      Bottom line: don't just sit or stand at work, but simply change your position often

  6. Jul 2022
    1. 9 evidence-based common denominators among the world’s centenarians that are believed to slow this aging process.

      List of 9 habits that will make you live longer (see text below)

    1. We don’t expect National Defence or health care to promote growth: we just accept that territorial integrity and a healthy populace are good things.

      Been making that point about health (especially since, like education, it's a provincial jurisdiction). It's easy to think of perverse incentives if a profit motive dominates education and health. Physicians would want people to remain sick and teachers would prefer it if learners required more assistance.

      Hadn't thought enough about the DND part. Sure gives me pause, given the amounts involved. Or the fact that there's a whole lot of profit made in that domain.

      So, businesspeople are quick to talk about "cost centres". Some of them realize that those matter a whole lot.

    1. Urgent Care Treatment with X-Rays in Castle Rock

      Founders Family Medicine and Urgent Care offer same-day care to patients who have urgent medical problems. Our medical center offers diagnostic testing, including x-ray and an on-site lab. Patients receive diagnosis and treatment from our professional medical team.

    1. “So keep fighting for freedom and justice, beloveds, but don't forget to have fun doin' it. Be outrageous... rejoice in all the oddities that freedom can produce. And when you get through celebrating the sheer joy of a good fight, be sure to tell those who come after how much fun it was!”— Molly Ivins
    1. The Benefits of Learning: The Impact of Education on Health, Family Life and ...

      Page 38: Effects of education upon health outcomes

    2. The Benefits of Learning: The Impact of Education on Health, Family Life and ...

      The benefits of learning: The impact of education on health, family life and social capital

    1. by V Raghupathi · 2020 · Cited by 78 — Some evidence suggests that education is strongly linked to health determinants such as preventative care [9]. Education helps promote and ...benefits of education on healthnegative effects of education on healthimpact of education on health pdfimpact of education on lifehealth and educationhow does education affect mental healthPeople also search for
  7. Jun 2022
    1. Sleeping Too Much Due to DepressionBehavior, Depression, Mental Health <img width="550" height="321" src="https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/sleeping-too-much-550x321.jpg.webp" class="attachment-entry_with_sidebar size-entry_with_sidebar wp-post-image" alt="sleeping too much" /> Table of Contents Is Oversleeping A Symptom of Depression?Some Basic Facts About Depressive DisordersWhat Causes Depression?How Depression Impacts Daily LifeGetting Help for DepressionHolistic Activities Complement Depression TreatmentElevation Behavioral Health Residential Depression Treatment Is Oversleeping A Symptom of Depression? When you feel sad all the time, sleeping becomes an opportunity for relief. Depression depletes your energy anyway, only adding to the desire to lie down and drift off to sleep. When your depressive state leads to sleeping too much, this condition is called hypersomnia, or the opposite of insomnia. Excessive sleeping is a common symptom of major depressive disorder. Escaping emotional pain through sleeping more hours than usual may be a means of self-managing the depression and sleeping too much may be a physiological effect of the reduction of neurotransmitters common among depressed patients. When the symptoms of depression, such as hypersomnia, are so significant that they undermine your quality of life, it is time to seek professional help. Depression is a serious mental health condition that may lead to a daily impairment that can undermine all areas of life. When excessive sleeping has impacted your career or job security, your relationships, or your overall wellbeing, proactive steps to improve psychological health are in order. <img class="aligncenter wp-image-30122 size-large" src="https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/depression-and-sleep-1030x687.jpeg" alt="depression and sleep" width="1030" height="687" /> Some Basic Facts About Depressive Disorders Depression is the second most common mental health disorder experienced by Americans. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, over 17 million Americans are afflicted with this debilitating condition each year. Additionally, 2.3 million adolescents struggle with depression, further defining depression as a serious mental health threat today. In fact, suicide is now the second leading cause of preventable death among young people aged 10-34. These statistics underscore the importance of getting professional help for managing this serious mental health condition. There are several different types of depression, with each type expressing unique features. Treatment for depression will be based on which particular type of depression is present. These types of depressive disorder include: Major depressive disorder MDD is the most widely diagnosed form of depression. A diagnosis of MDD results when five or more of the following symptoms are present for two weeks or longer: Persistent feelings of sadness, despair, or emptiness Irritability Feelings of guilt or worthlessness Fatigue Loss of interest in activities once enjoyed Difficulty making decisions or concentrating Sleep disturbances Changes in eating habits, weight changes Thoughts of suicide or death Dysthymia Dysthymic, or persistent depressive disorder, is a type of depression that persists for more than two years. Someone with dysthymia may experience periods of severe depression alternating with periods of mild depression symptoms for more than two years. Postpartum depression A woman who experiences serious symptoms of depression during and/or after giving birth has postpartum depression. The symptoms may be so severe that the mother is unable to care for her child or for herself. They may experience severe fatigue, exhaustion, and anxiety in addition to the intense sadness. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder PMDD is related to a woman’s hormonal cycle, and features intensified PMS symptoms, such as angry outbursts, hopelessness, irritability, hypersomnia, excessive crying, and sensitivity to rejection. Seasonal affective disorder Climates further from the equator may lead to depression symptoms that are caused by a lack of sun exposure during the winter months. The individual may experience the symptoms of sleeping too much depression, weight gain, and isolation behaviors in addition to other depression symptoms. We Can Help! Call Now! (888) 561-0868 Bipolar depression This type of depressive disorder features alternating dramatic and unpredictable shifts between depressive and manic moods. The low mood episodes are classified as bipolar depression What Causes Depression? Depression is an extremely complex mental health disorder. Why is it that some people seem to manage serious life events, such as the death of a loved one, a job loss, divorce, or other traumatic events, while others succumb to depression? To date, science has not yet determined the exact causes or factors related to depression, although ongoing research continues to offer new clues. For example, a recent study out of Japan reveals the action of certain protein signaling that may affect mood. The authors, Kobayashi et.al., state, “Taken together these findings suggest that RGS8 participates in modulation of depression-like behavior through ciliary MCHR1 expressed in the CA1 region.” Some of the factors that have been also been identified as contributing to depression include: Genetics. A family history of depression is one of the biggest predictors of the disorder. Individuals with a close relative who suffers from depression will increase the probability for other family members. Brain function. The neural connections, brain cell growth, and brain chemistry are factors in mood regulation. There is some scientific evidence that chemical imbalances in the brain may contribute to the onset of depression. Temperament. Personality traits, such as how excitable or how sensitive we are by nature can factor into depression. Stressful life events. People respond in their own unique way, often based on temperament, to stressful life events. Grief and loss, trauma, abuse, and many difficult life events can result in sustained and chronic depressed mood. Medical conditions. Some health conditions can contribute to depressions, such as Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, lupus, stroke, HIV, Parkinson’s disease, and erectile dysfunction in men. Some medications can also cause depression as a side effect of the drug. Substance abuse. Alcohol or drug abuse may precede the onset of depression. The negative consequences that follow a substance use disorder may overwhelm the individual and depression can develop as a result. How Depression Impacts Daily Life Living with depression on a day-to-day basis can have a significant impact on quality of life. In addition to the low mood and persistent feelings of sadness, depression can leave the individual feeling unwell. This combination of symptoms will often result in reduced functioning at work and at home. Sleep disruptions, including sleeping too much or sleeping too little, will wreak havoc with concentration, energy and stamina, memory functions, appetite, and can further intensify feelings of despair. When depression causes a person to literally not want to get out of bed all day it can cause a domino effect in all other realms. Hypersomnia may even lead to excessive absences at work and declining work performance overall. Excessive sleeping also has a negative impact on the family dynamic. When mom or dad is holed up in bed the children who are depending on the parent may not have access to the care they deserve. This places more pressure on the well parent to take up the extra burden, which can have an effect on the relationship. Eventually, the impact of depression will touch all aspects of life. Getting Help for Depression The fundamental treatment protocol for depression involves a combination of medication and psychotherapy: Psychotherapy. One-on-one talk therapy sessions allow the therapist to guide the individual toward resolving unaddressed emotional issues that may be contributing to the depression. These may involve past trauma, childhood abuse, grief and loss, divorce, and other painful life events. Cognitive behavioral therapy is useful for helping to guide patients toward established more self-affirming thoughts that lead to positive thought/behavior patterns. Group therapy sessions, such as a depression support group, can also be beneficial to individuals being treated for depression. Medication. Antidepressant drug therapy is the industry standard for depression treatment. There are dozens of antidepressants on the market today. These include SSRIs, SNRIs, MAOIs, and tricyclic antidepressants. The drugs vary in how they impact brain chemistry, and dosing adjustments or even changing to a different drug is common when trying to find the best fit for each patient. If the severity of the depression is becoming concerning it is appropriate to seek a residential mental health program to receive the highest level of mental health support. Although most individuals struggling with depression realize it is likely a temporary condition that will eventually pass, some may begin to believe things will never change. This can cause some to consider harming themselves. A residential mental health program will offer constant support and monitoring, as well as a more intensive and individualized approach to treating depression. Holistic Activities Complement Depression Treatment Psychiatry has begun to embrace holistic therapies as complementary to traditional treatment modalities for depression, as these activities can help reduce stress and induce feelings of calm. Some of the holistic treatment elements include: Yoga. Yoga involves slow, purposeful physical poses with a focus on breathing. Yoga is known to promote relaxation and reduce stress while also strengthening and stretching muscles, and reducing blood pressure and heart rate. Acupuncture. Acupuncture uses tiny needles to open up energy paths in the body thought to assist in the improvement of mind-body connectedness and wellness. Meditation. Mindfulness meditation is also helpful in training the brain to focus purposefully on the present moment, taking in the various sensory stimuli and focusing on rhythmic breathing. Exercise. The positive effects of getting regular exercise are caused by the release of brain chemicals, such as endorphins, serotonin, and dopamine. Aromatherapy. Certain essential oils have been found to relieve symptoms of depressed mood. These include jasmine, citrus oils, bergamot, and chamomile oils. Nutritional counseling. A diet rich in lean proteins, nuts and seeds, fresh vegetables and fruits, oily fish such as salmon, beans, and whole grains can significantly contribute to mental stability. Depression is a manageable mental health disorder. When the symptoms of depression lead to impairment in daily functioning, obtaining the support of a mental health professional is essential to recovery. Elevation Behavioral Health Residential Depression Treatment Elevation Behavioral Health is a Los Angeles-based residential program that offers intensive mental health treatment for depression. When outpatient interventions have been ineffective in improving quality of life, you may benefit from a more targeted treatment protocol. With deluxe accommodations and a highly attentive clinical staff, Elevation Behavioral Health strives to make the client’s stay a comfortable and healing experience. Elevation Behavioral Health offers a full daily schedule of therapies and adjunctive activities to help individuals struggling with depression reclaim their joy and return to healthy functioning. For more information about our program please contact us today at (888) 561-0868. February 17, 2020/0 Comments/by Elevation Behavioral HealthTags: depression and sleeping too much, sleeping a lot depression, sleeping too much depressionShare this entryShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TwitterShare on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on VkShare on RedditShare by Mail https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/sleeping-too-much.jpg 324 550 Elevation Behavioral Health https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/logo_ebh.png Elevation Behavioral Health2020-02-17 18:03:032022-06-16 21:57:43Sleeping Too Much Due to Depression 0 replies Leave a ReplyWant to join the discussion? Feel free to contribute! Leave a Reply Cancel replyYour email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *Name * Email * Website Comment * Δdocument.getElementById( "ak_js_1" ).setAttribute( "value", ( new Date() ).getTime() );

      Is oversleeping a symptom of depression? Learn about sleeping too much depression

    1. Elevation Behavioral Health Accepting New Clients: Information on Coronavirus (COVID-19) and How to Protect Yourself WE CAN HELP, CALL NOW (888) 561-0868 <img src="https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/logo_ebh.png.webp" height="100" width="300" alt='Elevation Behavioral Health' title='' /> Menu Menu Home About Our Team Mental Health Programs Residential Treatment Outpatient Treatment Transitional Living Conditions Treated Depressive Disorders Mood Disorders Personality Disorders Psychotic Disorders Self Harm Disorders Anxiety Disorders Attention Deficit Disorder Trauma Disorders Suicidal Ideation Dual Diagnosis Tour Our Homes Primary Substance Abuse Residential Primary Mental Health Residential Westlake Agoura Hills Admissions Contact Verify Insurance Blog Menu Menu What to Do When You Have Anxiety About Going to WorkAnxiety, Mental Health, Therapy <img width="845" height="321" src="https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Anxiety-about-going-to-work-845x321.jpg.webp" class="attachment-entry_with_sidebar size-entry_with_sidebar wp-post-image" alt="Anxiety about going to work" /> Table of Contents Why Do I Get Anxiety About Going To Work?About Workplace PhobiaWork PhobiaWhat Causes Workplace Phobia or Workplace-related Anxiety?How to Treat Workplace PhobiaElevation Behavioral Health Treats Workplace Phobia and Workplace-related Anxiety Why Do I Get Anxiety About Going To Work? The feelings of anxiety do not begin with the morning alarm bell. Nope, the anxiety about going to work is felt throughout the night with fitful, restless sleep. The mere idea of entering the workplace triggers waves of stress that threaten to undermine any effort to be productive and engaged at work, and often result in calling out sick. Workplace phobia, according to a definition published in Psychology, Health & Medicine, is defined as “a phobic anxiety reaction with symptoms of panic occurring when thinking of or approaching the workplace.” Considering the serious consequences of having anxiety about going to work, this particular phobia can be particularly devastating to not only one’s professional life but their personal life as well. Being unable to keep a job due to this type of phobia can have far-reaching and deleterious consequences. This specific source of this type of anxiety has often been lumped in with various other disorders. These include obsessive-compulsive disorder, social phobia, specific phobia, and generalized anxiety disorder. This fear work is due to the features of workplace phobia disorder, which can be recognized in these other forms of anxiety disorder. Finding a remedy is critical, and will likely involve a combination of therapies to help the individual overcome the dread and fear of going to work. <img class="aligncenter wp-image-30059 size-large" src="https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/anxiety-about-going-to-work-everyday-1030x783.jpg.webp" alt="anxiety about going to work everyday" width="1030" height="783" srcset="https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/anxiety-about-going-to-work-everyday-1030x783.jpg.webp 1030w,https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/anxiety-about-going-to-work-everyday-300x228.jpg.webp 300w,https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/anxiety-about-going-to-work-everyday-768x584.jpg.webp 768w,https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/anxiety-about-going-to-work-everyday-1536x1168.jpg.webp 1536w,https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/anxiety-about-going-to-work-everyday-1500x1141.jpg.webp 1500w,https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/anxiety-about-going-to-work-everyday-705x536.jpg.webp 705w,https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/anxiety-about-going-to-work-everyday.jpg.webp 1620w" sizes="(max-width: 1030px) 100vw, 1030px" /> About Workplace Phobia Individuals who have anxiety about going to work may exhibit a higher level of psychosomatic symptoms. These are the physical symptoms that can accompany a mental health condition, including gastrointestinal distress, migraines, pain, headaches, and fatigue, and often result in excessive absenteeism due to sick days. In fact, one 2014 study published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine found that 10% of patients with chronic mental health conditions who sought sick leave authorizations for their physical symptoms suffered from workplace phobia. Identifying workplace phobia is essential in turning the ship around and overcoming a disorder that is negatively impacting the quality of life. Employers also benefit from gaining an understanding of this type of anxiety, as loss of productivity related to paid sick days, having to hire temporary workers, and the impact on fellow coworkers are added costs to the business. Work Phobia Intense irrational fear emerges when the individual thinks about or attempts to go to work. The triggering stimuli, such as encountering the supervisor or colleague, can cause symptoms like those of a specific phobia, such as: We Can Help! Call Now! (888) 561-0868 Sweating Hot flashes, chills Trembling Choking sensation Inability to face the trigger (enter the workplace) Chest pain, tightness Dry mouth Ringing in the ears Intensive fear when approaching or considering the workplace Shortness of breath A sensation of butterflies in the stomach Mental confusion, disorientation Rapid heart rate Nausea Headaches Reduction of symptoms when leaving or avoiding the workplace When exposed to the workplace trigger, the symptoms are so uncomfortable and frightening that the anxiety about going to work can result in avoidance behaviors, thus the high rates of sick leave. According to an article published in the Journal of Anxiety Disorders, There are several subtypes of work phobic, including: Work-related anxiety Work-related panic Work-related social phobia Work-related phobia Work-related generalized anxiety Work-related PTSD What Causes Workplace Phobia or Workplace-related Anxiety? Workplace phobia also referred to as can have various causal factors. Aside from the existence of a disorder such as social anxiety, which can feature workplace anxiety or phobia features, other risk factors might include: Having had a prior work-related experience that was traumatic, such as sexual harassment or bullying Performance-based fears Fear of required oral presentations Ongoing interpersonal issues and conflicts with a superior Family history of social anxiety or phobia Multiple traumas or significant negative life events lead to coping or stress-management issues at work How to Treat Workplace Phobia Treating work-related anxiety will revolve around changing the thought distortions that lead to avoidant behaviors or panic symptoms. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a type of psychotherapy that helps patients identify the dysfunctional thought-behavior patterns and guide them toward reframing thoughts to eventually be able to cope when confronting the work-related trigger. Combining CBT with exposure therapies that help desensitize the patient to the triggering event or situation can yield positive results. Medication also plays a role in the treatment of workplace phobia or anxiety. Drugs that reduce anxiety, such as benzodiazepines or beta-blockers, may help improve the individual’s ability to function in the workplace once again. Certain holistic strategies can assist in the reduction of stress or anxiety symptoms. These might include yoga, guided meditation, deep breathing exercises, mindfulness, getting regular exercise, and reducing caffeine intake. Elevation Behavioral Health Treats Workplace Phobia and Workplace-related Anxiety Elevation Behavioral Health is a luxury residential mental health program located in Los Angeles, California. The team at Elevation has crafted a highly effective treatment protocol for treating workplace phobia or anxiety, using an integrative approach. This includes evidence-based therapies, such as cognitive behavioral therapy and exposure therapy, adjunctive therapies, such as EMDR, and holistic therapies that provide additional coping skills through mindfulness training and meditation. For more information about our program, please contact Elevation Behavioral Health today at (888) 561-0868. June 26, 2020/0 Comments/by Elevation Behavioral HealthTags: anxiety, Anxiety about going to work, anxiety before work, anxiety going to work, fear of going to work, fear of work, going to work, phobia, work, work phobiaShare this entryShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on VkShare on RedditShare by Mail
    1. Castle Rock Urgent Care and Family Medicine Founders Family Medicine

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    1. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-complicated-legacy-of-e-o-wilson/

      I can see why there's so much backlash on this piece.

      It could and should easily have been written without any reference at all to E. O. Wilson and been broadly interesting and true. However given the editorial headline "The Complicated Legacy of E. O. Wilson", the recency of his death, and the photo at the top, it becomes clickbait for something wholly other.

      There is only passing reference to Wilson and any of his work and no citations whatsoever about who he was or why his work was supposedly controversial. Instead the author leans in on the the idea of the biology being the problem instead of the application of biology to early anthropology which dramatically mis-read the biology and misapplied it for the past century and a half to bolster racist ideas and policies.

      The author indicates that we should be better with "citational practices when using or reporting on problematic work", but wholly forgets to apply it to her own writing in this very piece.

      I'm aware that the magazine editors are most likely the ones that chose the headline and the accompanying photo, but there's a failure here in both editorial and writing for this piece to have appeared in Scientific American in a way as to make it more of a hit piece on Wilson just days after his death. Worse, the backlash of the broadly unsupported criticism of Wilson totally washed out the attention that should have been placed on the meat of the actual argument in the final paragraphs.

      Editorial failed massively on all fronts here.


      This article seems to be a clear example of the following:

      Any time one uses the word "problematic" to describe cultural issues, it can't stand alone without some significant context building and clear arguments about exactly what was problematic and precisely why. Otherwise the exercise is a lot of handwaving and puffery that does neither side of an argument or its intended audiences any good.

  8. May 2022
    1. When a Depressed Teenager Won’t Get Out of BedDepression, Mental Health, Teens, Treatment<img width="845" height="321" src="https://bnitreatment.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/depressed-teenager-wont-get-out-of-bed-845x321.jpg" class="wp-image-30325 avia-img-lazy-loading-not-30325 attachment-entry_with_sidebar size-entry_with_sidebar wp-post-image" alt="depressed teenager won&#039;t get out of bed" /> Table of Contents Your Depressed Teenager Won’t Get Out of Bed. Now What?About Teen DepressionCauses of Teen DepressionSuicide Risk for Depressed TeensGetting Help for a Teen with DepressionBNI Treatment Provides Residential Mental Health Treatment for Teens Your Depressed Teenager Won’t Get Out of Bed. Now What? It is hard for a parent to admit that something is not right with their child. Sure, when the teen years hit it is very common to notice an increase in moodiness and drama. But when the teenager flat out refuses to leave their bed, it is cause for worry, indeed. Teens may go through a tough time, maybe due to social problems, family issues, or trouble at school. In most cases, these kinds of problems are usually short-lived and the teen will cycle through the emotions in time. Sometimes, though, depression can be at the root of the teen’s desire to stay isolated in their room. Parents who suspect their teen is struggling with depression should enlist the help of a trained mental health expert. Teen depression should not be ignored, as suicides in this age cohort are on the rise. About Teen Depression When your teen won’t leave their room, or even get out of bed, and this persists, it might be due to depression. The NIH reports that teen depression now affects 13.3% of our youth between the ages of 13-17. This reflects about 3.2 million teens. Rates of depression are almost twice as high in teen girls versus boys. Symptoms of teen depression may include: Feeling sad or hopeless. Changes in sleep patterns. Changes in eating habits; sudden weight gain or loss. Fatigued, listless. Loss of interest in usual hobbies. Irritable; angry outbursts Withdraws from friends and family. Low self-esteem. Sensitive to peer rejection or being criticized. Trouble paying attention in school. Frequent headaches or stomach aches. Talks about death, suicidal thoughts. Teens that are still showing these signs after a two-week period should be seen by a doctor. Causes of Teen Depression Teen depression is somewhat of a mystery. With all the advances made in science and so much research, the exact cause of depression is still not known. Hormone changes during the teen years may contribute somewhat, and there are other risk factors for depression as well. Some of these risk factors include: Family History. Depression is more common among teens with family members who also suffer from it. Teen Hormones. The influx of growth and sex hormones during the teen years can impact brain chemistry. Family Changes. Teens may have a tough time working through a difficult life event. It might involve moving to another town or school, a divorce, or a death in the family. Social Anxiety. The teen years are stressful. Social anxiety can be a problem for some teens. The social skills may not yet be developed, so the teen may struggle with fitting in or with feeling rejected. Social Media. Prolonged exposure to social media can lead to depression. Teens are very self-conscious of their looks and social media can make them more insecure. Body dysmorphia, being bullied, and eating disorders are common. School Pressures. Young people feel a lot of pressure to excel in high school as they look toward college. Some teens struggle with grades or a learning deficit and may come to feel they are letting their parents down. Childhood Trauma. A history of abuse or neglect can trigger depression even years later. Romantic Breakups. During the heightened emotions of the teen years, romantic feelings are intense. When a breakup or rejection occurs it can be very hard for the teen to deal with. Covid-19. The lingering effects of the Covid-19 pandemic have had a deep impact on teens. Long months of social isolation and loneliness, as well as the many changes Covid brought, have been hard on teens. Suicide Risk for Depressed Teens Teen suicide has spiked in recent years. Suicide is now the second leading cause of death for young people between ages 10-24, according to data from the CDC. In teens, the danger is the still immature limbic system in the brain. This is the region that controls decision-making and impulsivity. A teen may decide on a whim to just “end it all” because they do not have the coping skills. Where an adult can better manage difficult emotions, a teen isn’t equipped because their brain is still developing. Call Our Parent Hotline (888) 522-1504 Warning signs of suicide among teens include: Impulsive behaviors. Becoming more withdrawn. Giving away prized possessions. Having angry outbursts, rage, or violent behaviors. Feeling like they have no real purpose in life. Obsessed with thoughts of death and suicide. Chronic sleep problems. Changes in eating and sleeping habits. Feelings of shame, guilt, excessive worry, or grief. Stops showing up for activities once enjoyed. Substance abuse. Obtaining the means to complete suicide, such as weapon or pills. Getting Help for a Teen with Depression So what does a parent do if their depressed teenager won’t get out of bed? The first big step is to not ignore the teen’s behavior and mood state. A day or two, fine, but a week or longer is a warning sign not to be ignored. Set up a meeting with the family doctor as a starting point. Once a health issue is ruled out, the doctor can refer the teen to a mental health provider. In most cases, the teen will be treated with outpatient actions at first. This is likely to involve an antidepressant and talk therapy. If the teen’s mood state worsens, though, it is time to consider a more intensive treatment solution. A residential program offers the teen a place to work through the issues that are factors in the depression. These programs also offer tutoring so the teen can keep up with school while in treatment. The mental health program includes: Therapy. This is offered in both one on one and group formats. Includes evidence-based therapies like CBT, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, and solutions-focused therapy. Life skills.  The teens will be taught new coping skills, communication skills, conflict resolution techniques, and relating skills. Meds. Some teens may benefit from drug therapy, although the risks must be weighed. Holistic. Some activities enhance results, such as surf therapy, equine therapy, recreational therapy, art, dance, music, and drama therapy, and yoga. If your depressed teenager won’t get out of bed, and they aren’t getting better, consider a residential program for teens. BNI Treatment Provides Residential Mental Health Treatment for Teens BNI Treatment Centers give parents the needed support for helping a teen with depression. The expert psychiatric staff has designed a program that is attuned to the needs of teens, protocols that teens will respond to. For any questions about the program, please contact BNI today at (888) 522-1504.
    1. What to Do About Teenage Cell Phone AddictionAddiction, Mental Health, Self Esteem, Treatment<img width="845" height="321" src="https://bnitreatment.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/teenage-cell-phone-addiction-845x321.jpg" class="wp-image-30300 avia-img-lazy-loading-not-30300 attachment-entry_with_sidebar size-entry_with_sidebar wp-post-image" alt="teenage cell phone addiction" /> Table of Contents Teenage cell phone addiction disrupts family time, social time, and study time.What is Teenage Cell Phone Addiction?What Are Signs of Teen Cell Phone Addiction SymptomsThe Impact of Teen Social Media Addiction on Mental HealthWhat Do You Do If Your Teenage Is Addicted to Their PhoneBNI Treatment Centers Helps Teens with Mental Health Disorders Teenage cell phone addiction disrupts family time, social time, and study time. For a teen, having a cell phone is like being a kid in a candy store. With app stores offering a never-ending array of options, it is easy to see how teens get addicted to their phones. By design, software companies have found ways to draw people into their digital products, including teens. Social media apps, and there are many, gobble up the most time among teens. Teens are on these social apps for several hours a day. Data show that teens spend about 3 hours a day on social media. An astounding 20% of teens are on these social platforms for more than 5 hours a day. On average, teens are on their phones about 7 hours per day. Smartphone addiction is very real. When teens use the apps, they will receive a dopamine hit that gets logged in the brain’s reward system. This leads to the teen spending ever more time on their phones, as the behavior gets continually reinforced. Keep reading to learn more about teen cell phone addiction and what can be done to curb the problem. What is Teenage Cell Phone Addiction? There is ample research showing how smartphone overuse, especially social media, impacts the brain. In fact, it can cause the same brain chemical responses as a drug. When a teen sees new likes, positive comments, or new followers on their feeds, they receive a burst of dopamine. Similar to a drug’s high, as social app use escalates, the more engagement they crave. The time spent engaging on social feeds will increase more and more as this reward cycle takes hold. The teen may put off other activities they once enjoyed in exchange for spending more time on their phones. Homework is not completed, which affects the teen’s grades. Sleep is forfeited, which impacts their health in many ways. In person social time is traded off for engaging with strangers on their social media feeds. All of these adverse effects caused by excess cell phone use can lead to mental health issues. Anxiety can result due to the time wasted on the phone. This causes stress because the teen now lacks time to complete their schoolwork or chores. Too much time online also results in depression, mainly because the teen begins to feel lonely. What Are Signs of Teen Cell Phone Addiction Symptoms As with other behavioral addictions, there will be certain signs the teen displays. Signs of a teenage cell phone addiction might include: Teen cannot carry on a live conversation. Teen is always scrolling and clicking around on their phone. Teen is not able to be without their phone, even for a few minutes. Teen shows signs of depression the more they are on their phone. Teen becomes obsessed with selfies and their social feels. Teen is having sleep problems. Teen’s grades drop, due to reduced time for studying or homework. Parents might want to think about having a digital time out, where all phones are shelved for a day or a weekend. Taking a break from the cell phones will do the whole family a lot of good. The Impact of Teen Social Media Addiction on Mental Health During the teen years, the brain is still under construction. The teen brain is more vulnerable to things that could lead to an addiction, like video games and social media. A recent study explains how the reward system in the teenage brain works. Call Our Parent Hotline (888) 522-1504 It shows the same type of dopamine release in response to social media likes as one might have to a drug. The study also points out that the teen will show “withdrawal” symptoms, like irritability and anxiety. This happens when they are not allowed to use their cell phone or social media. But anxiety and depression in themselves can be a result of too much cell phone use. Studies show that teens that spend large amounts of time on social platforms suffer from higher levels of mental health issues. This is due to the time spent on social apps, which can fuel low self-esteem, body dysmorphia, and bullying. Also, excess time on smartphones means a lack of in person contact with friends and family. Face-to-face time is traded off for huge amounts of time chatting online with strangers. These interactions are shallow and do not lead to any real human connection. Over time, this can result in feelings of loneliness and depression. What Do You Do If Your Teenage Is Addicted to Their Phone Parent Guidelines to Reduce Teenager Cell Phone Addiction Parents can help limit their teen’s cell phone use in several ways. It is likely a waste of time to forbid them to be on their phones, but you can set rules. Remind the teen that having a phone is a privilege, not a right, and that you are paying for it. Of course, guidelines for a 13 year-old will be different from that of a 17 year-old. Consider these tips for parents: Set limits on time for phone use. Set up screen-free periods during the day, with a place for the phone to be stored during that time. Tell the teen the phone will be shut off if their grades drop. Have your teen shut down their cell phone at a certain time each night. Keep communication open and bring up any concerns if you think they might be bullied on social media. Have clear consequences should the teen break your cell phone rules. Suggest your teen take breaks from their cell phone to enjoy an outdoor activity. Teach the teen about online predators. Limit the types of social media platforms they can use. Because social media isn’t going anywhere, it is best for parents to take the offense and partner with their teen to help them negotiate the challenges and emotional landmines together. Learning ways to reduce the chances for teenage cell phone addiction can help your teen avoid risks to mental health. BNI Treatment Centers Helps Teens with Mental Health Disorders BNI Treatment Centers provides the intensive treatment and support needed for teens with depression or anxiety disorders. Teens who struggle with mental health issues related to smartphone addiction are guided toward making better use of their time. For more details about our program, call BNI today at (888) 522-1504.

      Parent Guidelines to Reduce Teenager addicted to Cell Phone

      Parents can help limit their teen’s cell phone use in several ways. It is likely a waste of time to forbid them to be on their phones, but you can set rules.