59 Matching Annotations
  1. Dec 2023
  2. Sep 2023
    1. "Surrendering" by Ocean Vuong

      1. He moved into United State when he was age of five. He first came to United State when he started kindergarten. Seven of them live in the apartment one bedroom and bathroom to share the whole. He learned ABC song and alphabet. He knows the ABC that he forgot the letter is M comes before N.

      2. He went to the library since he was on the recess. He was in the library hiding from the bully. The bully just came in the library doing the slight frame and soft voice in front of the kid where he sit. He left the library, he walked to the middle of the schoolyard started calling him the pansy and fairy. He knows the American flag that he recognize on the microphone against the backdrop.

  3. Jul 2023
    1. I'm using LaTeX to create my Zettel notes. .t3_158gy35._2FCtq-QzlfuN-SwVMUZMM3 { --postTitle-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postTitleLink-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postBodyLink-VisitedLinkColor: #989898; }

      reply to u/AndreSanch at https://www.reddit.com/r/Zettelkasten/comments/158gy35/im_using_latex_to_create_my_zettel_notes/

      This sort of thing has certainly been done before by many. Be careful of going overboard.

      If you don't already have a list of most of the common LaTeX math symbols, here's a good starter list, but make sure that your assigned meaning to them from an argumentation perspective is either "standard" or you've written it down for later use/memory. (There's nothing worse than a 10 year old note whose symbols you no longer remember.)

      If you haven't done a course in philosophy or logic (something along the lines of Elements of Logic), then that may also help you in terms of many of the common uses/meanings, though there are a variety of meanings to various symbols through time, so take care.

      Scribes and scholars over time have used a variety of symbols and annotations to mean various things, some of which were standardized in various contexts. For more on this take a look at some of Evina Stein's work and research on historic texts. Some of this might include:

      Steinová, Evina. “Nota and Require. The Oldest Western Annotation Symbols and Their Dissemination in the Early Middle Ages.” Scribes and the Presentation of Texts (from Antiquity to c. 1550). Proceedings of the 20th Colloquium of the Comité International de Paléographie Latine, 2021, 473–89. https://doi.org/10.1484/M.BIB-EB.5.124987.<br /> ———. Notam Superponere Studui: The Use of Annotation Symbols in the Early Middle Ages. Brepols, 2019.<br /> Steinova, Evina. “Technical Signs in Early Medieval Manuscripts Copied in Irish Minuscule.” In The Annotated Book in the Early Middle Ages: Practices of Reading and Writing, edited by M. J. Teeuwen and I. Van Renswoude, 37–85. Brepols, 2017.

      For those interested in scratching the surface of some possibilities and history, I might recommend:

      Scheinerman, Edward R. Mathematical Notation: A Guide for Engineers and Scientists. CreateSpace, 2011.

      Your note about Forte, while cute and clever doesn't necessarily mean that he's an old man, however, so take care about your propositions and what you draw from them or else your system won't hold up for long.

  4. Jun 2023
    1. The function symbol notation is the least used notational system in jazz. As the namesuggests, this notation specifies the harmonic function of individual chords and evencomplete chord progressions. It has the potential of being useful to notate specificbehaviors of chords that may not—at least, not on the surface level—indicate that theybelong to a particular functional family of chords. As such, function symbols enable theperception of harmonic progressions from a more structural perspective. Function symbolsindicate neither the architecture nor the specific scale degrees of chords. This style ofnotation is more conceptual than it is representative of a specific surface event. The termssurface level and structural level are used to describe musical events and the degree oftheir importance. “Structural” events occur beneath the musical “surface” and areresponsible for the overall tonal, harmonic, and melodic forces controlling the piece.Function symbols use three labels: T for tonic-type chords, PD for predominant-typechords, and D for dominant-type chords.
  5. May 2023
  6. Mar 2023
  7. Feb 2023
    1. I’ve also begun adopting a style loosely based on the approach to introductory signals used in legal writing, where things like See: [[something]] and See also: [[something]] and But see: [[something]] each have slightly different meanings. This gives me a set of supporting, comparison, and contradictory signals I can use when placing links as well.

      Shorthand notations or symbols in one's notes can be used to provide help in structuring arguments. Small indicators like "see: x", "see also: y", or "but see: z" can be used for adding supporting, comparison, or contradictory material respectively.

    1. I agree.After thinking about it for a bit, a common symbol for "the present card/note" is the one I'm most wanting.For the other stuff, I'm thinking:The squigly arrow symbol in latex is probably enough to do fuzziness. Then it could be squigly arrow to the current card or squigly arrow to not symbol current card. And for pen and paper, just use the biochem flat arrow with a squigly body for "somewhat contradicts" or is in tension with.

      reply to stjeromeslibido at https://www.reddit.com/r/Zettelkasten/comments/10qw4l5/comment/j6x52ce/?utm_source=reddit&utm_medium=web2x&context=3

      Luhmann often used the shorthand of red numbers to indicate a link to nearby card in the current branch/stem, which Scott Scheper calls "stemlinks" in Antinet Zettelkasten (2022) p234. So, for example, on card ZKII 9/8 there is a red "1" which indicates the branching card ZKII 9/8,1. Scott uses a more computer science oriented notation of "/1" to indicate this as if he were traversing up or down a folder structure. Since there isn't really a (useful) idea of a root or home folder, and one wouldn't often want to refer to their zettelkasten itself, one might consider using the solidus "/" to indicate the current card? I personally do this, but not very frequently, though I might do it more often with respect to indicating argumentation within and among other cards.

      Some languages have location/proximity identifiers or markers (similar to here/there/over there). I'll sometimes use the Japanese markers (ko-so-a-do) as shorthand to provide rough approximation of idea relationships particularly when I have open questions. (example: kore, sore, are, dore -> this one, that one, that one over there, which one?) Many ideas are marked あ to indicate "just out of reach" or "needs additional thought". When ideas are adjacent or nearby, but by happenstance are relatively far away within my ZK (with respect to physical card distance in the box) they'll be pre-pended like こ/510/4b/3 (aka "ko"/510/4b/3).

    2. Are there symbols for 'supported by' or 'contradicted by' etc. to show not quite formal logical relations in a short hand?

      reply to u/stjeromeslibido at https://www.reddit.com/r/Zettelkasten/comments/10qw4l5/are_there_symbols_for_supported_by_or/

      In addition to the other excellent suggestions, I don't think you'll find anything specific that that was used historically for these, but there are certainly lots of old annotation symbols you might be able to co-opt for your personal use.

      Evina Steinova has a great free cheat sheet list of annotation symbols: The Most Common Annotation Symbols in Early Medieval Western Manuscripts (a cheat sheet).

      More of this rabbit hole:

      (Nota bene: most of my brief research here only extends to Western traditions, primarily in Latin and Greek. Obviously other languages and eras will have potential ideas as well.)

      Tironian shorthand may have something you could repurpose as well: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tironian_notes

      Some may find the auxiliary signs of the Universal Decimal Classification useful for some of these sorts of notations for conjoining ideas.


      Given the past history of these sorts of symbols and their uses, perhaps it might be useful for us all to aggregate a list of common ones we all use as a means of re-standardizing some of them in modern contexts? Which ones does everyone use?

      Here are some I commonly use:

      Often for quotations, citations, and provenance of ideas, I'll use Maria Popova and Tina Roth Eisenberg's Curator's Code:

      • ᔥ for "via" to denote a direct quotation/source— something found elsewhere and written with little or no modification or elaboration (reformulation notes)
      • ↬ for "hat tip" to stand for indirect discovery — something for which you got the idea at a source, but modified or elaborated on significantly (inspiration by a source, but which needn't be cited)

      Occasionally I'll use a few nanoformats, from the microblogging space, particularly

      • L: to indicate location

      For mathematical proofs, in addition to their usual meanings, I'll use two symbols to separate biconditionals (necessary/sufficient conditions)

      • (⇒) as a heading for the "if" portion of the proof
      • (⇐) for the "only if" portion

      Some historians may write 19c to indicate 19th Century, often I'll abbreviate using Roman numerals instead, so "XIX".

      Occasionally, I'll also throw drolleries or other symbols into my margins to indicate idiosyncratic things that may only mean something specifically to me. This follows in the medieval traditions of the ars memoria, some of which are suggested in Cornwell, Hilarie, and James Cornwell. Saints, Signs, and Symbols: The Symbolic Language of Christian Art 3rd Edition. Church Publishing, Inc., 2009. The modern day equivalent of this might be the use of emoji with slang meanings or 1337 (leet) speak.

  8. Dec 2022
    1. No one can say how many symbols Tiro came up with — presumably he wrote it down, but no such key is known to have survived — but successors began adding to it until, according to Isidore of Seville writing around 630 CE, no less than Seneca himself had topped it up to 5,000 symbols.
  9. Nov 2022
  10. Aug 2022
    1. I use the asterisk in the conventional way, to indicate a sentence that deviates in some respectfrom grammatical rule.

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    1. Symbols might conveniently have been used for woids ofsuch frequent occurrence as: for, in, of, with, as, to, the,bill, statute, footnote.

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  11. Jul 2022
    1. he Last Rose of

      From how strongly roses have been associated with Cuff, it would be worth tracking when/where they appear again

  12. Apr 2022
  13. Mar 2022
    1. 1. Multiple strong symbols are not allowed○ Each item can be defined only once2. Given a strong symbol and multiple weak symbols, choose the strong symbol○ References to the weak symbol resolve to the strong symbol3. If there are multiple weak symbols, pick an arbitrary one

      linker 如何解决重复符号定义的问题?

    2. ● Global symbols○ Symbols defined by module m that can be referenced by other modules.■ e.g., non-static C functions and non-static global variables.● External symbols○ Global symbols that are referenced by module m but defined by some other module.● Local symbols○ Symbols that are defined and referenced exclusively by module m.■ e.g., C functions and global variables defined with the static attribute.○ Local linker symbols are not local program variables

      分别有哪些 linker symbol?

  14. Sep 2021
    1. die and rise the same

      Though The Canonization can be separated from his "earlier poems that reflect more generally to erotic encounters," John Donne still uses some sexual allusions to show his wit and connection of this poem to his early reputation as an ingenious erotic poet.

      Here, following words can be interpreted as below. Die - Orgasm

      Rise - Erection

      Die and Rise - Copulation

      Source: Source: Hadfield. Andrew. John Donne : In the Shadow of Religion, 2021, p132

  15. May 2021
  16. Apr 2021
    1. The form of the obelus as a horizontal line with a dot above and a dot below, ÷, was first used as a symbol for division by the Swiss mathematician Johann Rahn in his book Teutsche Algebra in 1659.
  17. Mar 2021
    1. To the consternation of some users, 3.x employed Unicode variable names such as λ, φ, τ and π for a concise representation of mathematical operations. A downside of this approach was that a SyntaxError would occur if you loaded the non-minified D3 using ISO-8859-1 instead of UTF-8. 3.x also used Unicode string literals, such as the SI-prefix µ for 1e-6. 4.0 uses only ASCII variable names and ASCII string literals (see rollup-plugin-ascii), avoiding encoding problems.
  18. Jan 2021
    1. The abstract shapes in the brackets symbolize the "OK" from the boot up screen, services running inside systemd, and our overall optimistic outlook.
  19. Dec 2020
    1. Used injudiciously in these circumstances, mathematics – and especially mathematical modelling – can serve to obfuscate rather than clarify, or at best add nothing at all to the situation other than the illusion of control.

      We find it very difficult to deal with uncertainty so are comforted by the high Priestesses of our era, vaguely aware of our hunger for the signs, symbols written in the runes descended from antiquity for portents of the future.

  20. Nov 2020
  21. Jul 2020
    1. Most of Algol's "special" characters (⊂, ≡, ␣, ×, ÷, ≤, ≥, ≠, ¬, ⊃, ≡, ∨, ∧, →, ↓, ↑, ⌊, ⌈, ⎩, ⎧, ⊥, ⏨, ¢, ○ and □) can be found on the IBM 2741 keyboard with the APL "golf-ball" print head inserted; these became available in the mid-1960s while ALGOL 68 was being drafted. These characters are also part of the Unicode standard and most of them are available in several popular fonts.
  22. Jun 2020
  23. May 2020
  24. Apr 2020
  25. Jan 2020
  26. Feb 2019
    1. This supplemented the individual's memory and ability to visualize. (We are not concerned here with the value derived from human cooperation made possible by speech and writing, both forms of external symbol manipulation. We speak of the manual means of making graphical representations of symbols—

      The expression "manual means of making graphical representation" makes me think of photography as a memory aid or augmenting tool. Although, of course, it would not necessarily refer to a symbolic portrayal.

      Interestingly, neuroscience today affirms our memory is far from a simple pointing to the past function, but it actually alters or edits the memory itself each time we go back to it and probably the subject who remembers changes in the process. Could that be an example of how technological aids can augment our brain processing of memories?

      I have recently explored this idea on my blog in a post called As We May Remember (a wink to the Vannebar Bush essay) http://eltnotes.blogspot.com/2019/02/as-we-may-remember.html

    1. ಆವ ಜಾತಿಯಲ್ಲಿ ಹುಟ್ಟಿದವನಾದಡಾಗಲಿ,ಶ್ರೀಮಹಾದೇವನ ನೆನೆವಾತನದ್ಥಿಕ ನೋಡಾ.ಆತನಿಂದದ್ಥಿಕ ಕಂಗಳು ತುಂಬಿ ನೋಡುವಾತ.ಆತನಿಂದದ್ಥಿಕ ಕೈಮುಟ್ಟಿ ಪೂಜಿಸುವಾತ.ಅದೆಂತೆಂದಡೆ, ಶಿವಧರ್ಮೇ-``ಲಿಂಗಸ್ಯ ದರ್ಶನಂ ಪುಣ್ಯಂ ದರ್ಶನಾತ್ ಸ್ಪರ್ಶನಂ ಶುಭಂ |ಶಿವಲಿಂಗಂ ಮಹಾಪುಣ್ಯಂ ಸರ್ವದೇವ ನಮಸ್ಕøತಂ |ಯಃ ಸ್ಪøಶೇದಪಿ ಪಾಣಿಭ್ಯಾಂ ನ ಸ ಪಾಪೈಃ ಪರಿಲಿಪ್ಯತೇ ||''ಎಂದುದಾಗಿ,ಅಂತಪ್ಪ ಶಿವಲಿಂಗವನು ಹೆರೆಹಿಂಗದೆ ಅಂಗದ ಮೇಲೆನಿರಂತರ ಧರಿಸಿಕೊಂಡಿಪ್ಪಾತನೆ ಎಲ್ಲರಿಂದದ್ಥಿಕ ನೋಡಾಅಖಂಡೇಶ್ವರಾ.
  27. Apr 2018
    1. Take for instance the case of Matt Bonner’s yellow mule.

      The mule is to become symbolic of man's inhumanity to man: the black man has been the mule to the white man; the townspeople are mules to Joe Stark; black women are mules (at least in status) to black men.

  28. Feb 2017
    1. Doubtless, if things themselves be under-stood, it docs not seem material what names are assigned them.

      This is odd to me; that Campbell seems unconcerned with any possible etymological or symbolic importance behind the words that describe the concepts he is discussing. As if the concepts can exist in the same manner without the words used to describe them? That the words have no symbolic meaning or importance in themselves, or that they might even contribute to understanding the greater concepts they represent? Is it really possible to divorce a word from "things" and still be able to understand those "things" abstractly? Idk man. Sounds like some "What's in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet," kind of bullshit to me. Like, idk Romeo, if we stop calling it a "rose" and start calling it a "prickly red blob" then that line loses a lot of its gusto.

    1. But because he makes use of words only, as the signs of emotions, which it is impossible they can represent; and omiL<; the use of the true signs of the passions, which are, tones, looks, and gestures.

      This is reminiscent of something I remember from Jung's Man and His Symbols: The ability to recognize and communicate with signs, symbols, and gestures was "discarded in the process of evolving the very differentiated consciousness [the emergence of language] that alone could be aware of them."

  29. May 2015
  30. Feb 2014
    1. Before I knew it, I found myself on a street I had never been to, in a city I had never been to, about to head into a room full of people I had never met before, all united by one simple symbol... 1 A penguin. An hour before, that penguin had seemed so inviting and friendly. It was a symbol that encompassed everything about the movement it represented, a movement that came together in spirit and mind to build a system that drove a new generation of technology and freedom... a movement that celebrated this drive by forming user groups in unknown streets, in unknown cities, and with unknown people.