52 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2022
    1. https://lu.ma/w6c1b9cd

      [[Anne-Laure Le Cunff & Nick Milo - How can we do Combinational Creativity]]

      Details

      Date: [[2022-09-06]]<br /> Time: 9:00 - 10:00 AM<br /> Host: [[Nick Milo]]<br /> Location / Platform: #Zoom<br /> URL: https://lu.ma/w6c1b9cd<br /> Calendar: link <br /> Parent event: [[LYT Conference 2]]<br /> Subject(s): [[combinational creativity]]

      To Do / Follow up

      • [ ] Clean up notes
      • [ ] Post video link when available (@2022-09-11)

      Video

      TK

      Attendees

      Notes

      generational effect

      Silent muses which resulted in drugs, alcohol as chemical muses.

      All creativity is combinational in nature. - A-L L C

      mash-ups are a tacit form of combinatorial creativity

      Methods: - chaining<br /> - clustering (what do things have in common? eg: Cities and living organisms have in common?)<br /> - c...

      Peter Wohlleben is the author of “hidden life of trees”

      CMAPT tools https://cmap.ihmc.us/

      mind mapping

      Metaphor theory is apparently a "thing" follow up on this to see what the work/research looks like

      I put the following into the chat/Q&A:

      The phrase combinatorial creativity seems to stem from this 2014 article: https://fs.blog/networked-knowledge-and-combinatorial-creativity/, the ideas go back much further obviously, often with different names across cultures. Matt Ridley describes it as "ideas have sex" https://www.ted.com/talks/matt_ridley_when_ideas_have_sex; Raymond Llull - Llullan combinatorial arts; Niklas Luhmann - linked zettels; Marshall Kirkpatrick - "triangle thinking" - Dan Pink - "symphonic thinking" are some others.

      For those who really want to blow their minds on how not new some of these ideas are, try out Margo Neale and Lynne Kelly's book Songlines: The Power and Promise which describes songlines which were indigenous methods for memory (note taking for oral cultures) and created "combinatorial creativity" for peoples in modern day Australia going back 65,000 years.

      Side benefit of this work:

      "You'll be a lot more fun at dinner parties." -Anne-Laure

      Improv's "yes and" concept is a means of forcing creativity.

      Originality is undetected plagiarism - Gish? English writer 9:41 AM quote; source?

      Me: "Play off of [that]" is a command to encourage combintorial creativity. In music one might say "riff off"...

      Chat log

      none available

    2. Anne-Laure Le Cunff & Nick Milo: How can we do Combinational Creativity?

      Interesting to see people talking about these ideas in these spaces. It's too often a missed piece of the puzzle, and is really one of the most valuable parts.

      What was the origin of the phrase "combinatorial creativity"? Was if Farnam Street in 2014 https://fs.blog/networked-knowledge-and-combinatorial-creativity/

      Some of Anne-Laure Le Cunff's discussion of this in the past: - Building a Creativity Inbox: Anne-Laure Le Cunff & David Perell https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MTSAuSUxuj0 (taped: June 23, 2020; released: Jun 25, 2020) where the phrase is uased as well as "idea sex" - Combinational creativity: the myth of originality https://nesslabs.com/combinational-creativity (see https://twitter.com/anthilemoon/status/1275820127058120705)

  2. Aug 2022
  3. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. honour

      The formality of Elizabeth vs Anne walking with Charles and Mary to visit the Musgrove party.

    2. her greatest want of composure would be in that quarter of the mind which could not be opened to Lady Russell

      She still can't be open with Lady Russell about her feelings for Captain Wentworth and what she thinks his feelings are for her

  4. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. woman he loved

      Is Mr Elliot capable of love? could his pursuit of Anne really be explained by anything else (as it doesn't assist with his goals)?

    2. I do know how to value your kindness in coming to me this morning. It is really very good of you to come and sit with me, when you must have so many pleasanter demands upon your time

      Does she know Anne at all? Has her experience at the hands of Mr Elliot made her question whether there is any real friendship?

  5. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Anne Elliot, with all her claims of birth, beauty, and mind

      Anne could have been Emma Woodhouse: "...handsome, clever, and rich" (E, Ch1).

    2. perhaps nearly all of peculiar attachment

      In Jane Austen The Secret Radical Helena Kelly posits that Anne and Captain Wentworth are not in love at the beginning of the book, but fall back in love during the course of the novel.

  6. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Colonel Wallis’s gallantry

      Colonel Wallis is very useful - telling the Elliot's about the first wife earlier and here ensuring Mr Elliot gets the seat by Anne, then distracting Elizabeth to keep her happy. He's been, I think, entirely removed from the adaptations. This the only time we see him in the book

  7. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Mary, often a little unwell, and always thinking a great deal of her own complaints

      In Jane Austen the Secret Radical Helena Kelly suggests that Mary is pregnant during the course of the novel. Is Mary a hypochondriac? She is the youngest child and like Anne probably didn't get much attention (even less from her mother as she was younger when she died). Have we been unjustly maligning Mary this whole time - could she have a chronic illness? Or is it about being an extrovert and really needing to feed off other people to feel "up"?

    2. glad to be thought of some use

      Sign of a people pleaser! Another thing Anne and Fanny Price have in common, they want to be useful

    3. autumnal months in the country

      Another link to Fanny Price who also enjoys seeing the seasons pass in the country

    4. most natural

      You can almost hear Anne "everything's fine, everything's normal"

  8. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. I wish you would make use of it, if you are determined to walk; though I think it would be more prudent to let me get you a chair

      He's attempting to "rescue" her again (this would make it 3 if he succeeded) how terrible for him that she is instead "rescued" but her cousin, the very man who's attention awakened him to his own feelings

    2. I may not have many more visits from you

      Not sure if she's implying that Anne will move away when she marries or Mr Elliot will convince her to drop the friendship

  9. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. if the woman who had been sensible of Captain Wentworth’s merits could be allowed to prefer another man

      Interesting echo to Lady Russell's thoughts about "the man who at twenty-three had seemed to understand somewhat of the value of an Anne Elliot, should, eight years afterwards, be charmed by a Louisa Musgrove" (Persuasion Chapter 13). She thinks it speaks badly of him to find someone superior to Anne, just as Anne almost can't believe that Louise prefers anyone to Captain Wentworth.

  10. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Mrs Smith was not the only widow in Bath between thirty and forty, with little to live on, and no surname of dignity

      In the 1995 adaptation Anne does say this. In reality it would have only made things uncomfortable for her, she is right not to speak. Her father would not understand her meaning and Elizabeth would take offense. Does anyone recall if she expresses this in the other adaptations?

    2. here was that elasticity of mind, that disposition to be comforted, that power of turning readily from evil to good, and of finding employment which carried her out of herself, which was from nature alone

      Mrs Smith is naturally a positive person but, like Anne, employment and feeling useful helps her. Anne's reaction seems to indicate that she would not deal as well as Mrs Smith in the same circumstances and perhaps that Mrs Smith would have dealt better with a broken engagement

    3. It would excite no proper interest there

      Could this be considered a visit of charity? Anne surely views it as a visit of friendship. But charitable visits were acceptable, in theory it should have been acceptable to her family (if they were themselves "acceptable").

    4. useful and good to her

      She sounds just like Anne! Anne was grieving her mother and Miss Hamilton/Mrs Smith stepped into a mothering role a little.

  11. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. He is just Lady Russell’s sort. Give him a book, and he will read all day long

      Perhaps Charles is one of the family members who believes Lady Russell persuaded Anne to refuse him because he wasn't bookish enough

    2. only died last June

      Yet when it comes to Mr Elliot, who is still in mourning and was actually married, everyone is fine with him pursuing Anne

  12. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. End of volume one

      This is a great cliff hanger to end the first volume. Will Louisa live? It seems like Captain Wentworth intends to marry her but what about Anne? and what of the mysterious cousin and heir?

    2. nothing

      Mary's selfishness knows no bounds. Anne is a much more capable person and does care for Louisa, it sounds rude to refer to their connection as "nothing" it echoes how Anne's family seem to regard her. It also leaves the two unmarried women to travel unaccompanied with an unrelated male - perhaps had they appealed to Mary with her importance as a married woman they may have had success

    3. I have always heard of Lady Russell as a woman of the greatest influence

      It was obviously the Musgrove family story that Lady Russell persuaded Anne to not marry Charles. But it hints that they may have somehow or other heard of her influence over Anne previously otherwise it's a very big coincidence

  13. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Captain

      In the 2007 and 2022 adaptations Captain Harville gives the impression that he knows who Anne is ie at some point Captain Wentworth told him of their history, likely they were at sea together directly after

  14. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. idle interference

      He almost certainly has Anne and their broken engagement in mind during this interaction. He has no idea what the consequences of this speech will be - Louisa's accident is a direct result of his words

    2. poetical descriptions extant of autumn

      In the 1970s miniseries (which huge hair) one of the Musgrove sisters asks Anne for an appropriate poem on this walk. In the 2022 adaptation Mary snipes at Anne when she tries to recite telling her she doesn't like poetry or it makes her sick (can anyone find the quote?)

    3. Anne’s object was, not to be in the way of anybody

      This might be Anne's life philosophy

    4. he dropped the arms of both to hunt after a weasel which he had a momentary glance of, and they could hardly get him along at all.

      Re-reading the novel after viewing Persuasion (2022), I was partly focused on finding the kind of comedy that Cracknell's adaptation foregrounds, which verges on slapstick at different moments, especially when Anne is involved. Anne's humor in the novel remains in the familiar realm of the satirical. But this scene with Charles Musgrove, Mary, and Anne is one of the few moments where it's possible to see some silliness in the narrative. The image of Charles chasing after this small animal to disengage himself from Mary's complaints is charming and makes him look quite silly: he is disarmed by her tenacious complaining and rather than endure them prefers to run after a small animal. The humor is turned against the couple, not at all an exemplar of marital respect. These two spouses might be found bickering but they are also conflict-averse, unable to enter into honest dialogue. The movie is inclined to giving Mary the upper hand. In the novel, Charles' possibly threatening masculinity is suggested through his persona as an avid sportsman. Hunting for weasels was not silly in and of itself at the time. These small and slender creatures had (and still do) a reputation for being ferocious predators. Thomas Bewick, who Austen would have known, describes them as follows in his A General History of Quadrupeds (1790): "The Weasel is very common, and well known in most parts of this country; is very destructive to young birds, poultry, rabbits, &c.; and is a keen devourer of eggs, which it sucks with great avidity" (219).

  15. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. everything most bewitching in his reception there; the old were so hospitable, the young so agreeable,

      It's not mentioned but you have to wonder if in the back of his mind he likes Anne seeing the Miss Musgroves flirting him and that is an unspoken reason he wants to stay, to get a petty revenge

  16. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. If a man had not a wife

      This must be painful for both Anne and Wentworth, the period referring to was just after their broken engagement and here the Admiral is speaking of wives. Austen doesn't point this out - it's up to the reader to "read the room"

  17. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. A strong mind, with sweetness of manner

      This does perfectly describe Anne but he thinks in stating this he is excluding her

    2. in the first moment of appeal, had spoken as he felt

      This implies that he wouldn't have said anything like this if he knew it would be repeated to Anne and that he spoke without thinking - he's still hurt over their breakup and perhaps wanted to say something hurtful

    3. a bow, a curtsey passed; she heard his voice

      You get the feeling from the way this is written that Anne is observing from some place else

    4. frightened, enquiring companions, than of very useful assistants

      Foreshadowing perhaps Louisa's fall, Henrietta and Mary going into hysterics and, Anne being the only useful person

  18. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. too much confidence by all parties, and being too much in the secret of the complaints of each house

      The 1995 adaptation does a wonderful scene of this - each character complaining to Anne in turn with their opposite sides of the argument

    2. knowing our own nothingness beyond our own circle

      This feels sad - Anne is considered nothing in her own circle, although there are different concerns at Uppercross I do believe the Musgroves really accept her. They are lovely people and I think had Anne married Charles she would have been happy in their family life

  19. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. perfectly good spirits

      Lady Russell is minimising Anne's heartbreak - she whisked Anne away to Bath to get her mind off Wentworth unsuccessfully. Anne's aversion to Bath is probably why she doesn't visit with Lady Russell each winter (it seems odd for Lady R to leave her behind)

  20. Jul 2022
  21. May 2022
    1. in 1950, when as a young editorial assistant at Doubleday in Paris she rescued the diary of Anne Frank from a pile of rejects and persuaded her superiors to publish it in the United States — a stroke of fortune that gave the English-speaking world the intimate portrait of a forgotten girl, the child everyone had lost in World War II.

      As an editorial assistant at Doubleday in Paris, Judith Jones rescued the diary of Anne Frank from a pile of rejects in 1950. She proceeded to persuade a superior to publish the diary in the United States.

  22. Jan 2022
  23. Nov 2021
    1. The New PuritansSocial codes are changing, in many ways for the better. But for those whose behavior doesn’t adapt fast enough to the new norms, judgment can be swift—and merciless.By Anne ApplebaumIllustrations by Nicolas OrtegaAugust 31, 2021Share
  24. Oct 2020
    1. But Bill’s class showed me that racism is judgment, that the classroom is a site that reproduces racism and White language supremacy, that how judgments in such spaces are made have just as much to do with larger, structural forces as they do with an individual’s idiosyncratic reading of a text

      Reminds me of Curzan's "Says Who? Questioning the Rules of the English Grammar" (2009), in which she writes,

      Through language, we assert our identities. And we judge others on language (873).

    2. White language supremacy

      And of Curzan's "Teaching the Politics of Standard English" (2002), in which she writes

      A student once asked me, after one of our discussions about American dialects and language attitudes, 'How do you sleep at night?' What, she wanted to know, did I think my role, as well as that of other linguists, should be in informing the public about such misconceptions about dialects and about the harmful repercussions of these misconceptions? How, she asked, could people be so misinformed about dialects? And didn’t we have a responsibility to educate the public? (340).

  25. Feb 2019
    1. no body endeavouring to put it in Practice

      This seems like a pretty direct appeal to Princess Anne, to whom the book is dedicated and who nearly gave Astell money to start a college.

  26. Oct 2018
    1. It was the schoolteacher and writer Anne Fisher whose English primer of 1745 began the notion that it's somehow bad to use they in the plural and that he stands for both men and women.
  27. Jan 2017
    1. Anne Sullivan grew up in Feeding Hills Massachusetts in a poor Irish immigrants house with her mother, father, and two younger brother, and sister. Her father was a poor farmhand who used all of their money on alcohol, he often beat Anne and her mother tried to hide her from him. when Anne was two she suffered from tracheotomy where her vision started to deteriorate very quickly. she had two unsuccessful operations before her mom died when she was seven from tuberculosis. Once her mom died the dad gave up the kids to relatives, nobody wanted Anne or her younger brother Jimmie since Anne was blind and Jimmie had a large tuberculosis lump on his hip. but the toddler was very healthy and was taken by their aunt. Anne and Jimmie were taken to Tewksbury

  28. Mar 2016
  29. Sep 2015
    1. Trial and Interrogation of Anne Hutchinson (1637).

      Study Questions:

      What specific criticisms does Winthrop have of Hutchinson?

      What seems to doom Hutchinson to banishment in this court record?