77 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2022
  2. Oct 2022
  3. Sep 2022
    1. there's actually at least one other science fiction book from the 50s written by alice mary norton who used to 00:07:07 write under andre norton pseudonym who talked about a relatively similar concept in the time traders although the idea here was a little bit different here the author explained that pretty much all the signs of modern civilization are going to be completely 00:07:20 erased by the time the next glacial period begins in other words everything you see around you all the cities all the technology every major building every major structure we've ever built will basically be gone there will be no 00:07:33 signs of it left and within just a few million years there will be no one to tell the story and that's of course not really far from the truth as a matter of fact that's exactly what the scientists in this hypothesis propose and explain as well and that's of course why it 00:07:46 makes it so difficult to either prove or disprove this we currently have no idea if any of this is correct here i actually wanted to show you this beautiful illustration by one of the authors we basically have no idea if back in the 00:07:58 day when the dinosaurs were around they also had some kind of a super intelligent species that would drive their own versions of cars have their own versions of smartphones and eventually result in their own demise over time all of this would be gone to 00:08:11 history because of the way that geology works on our planet but in this paper the scientists decided to actually work out any potential ideas or experiments we can conduct on the planet to try to find out if this actually existed and if 00:08:25 it was possible in the past

      !- similar to : common speculation of extinct civilization in Earth's history - Many people have thought about this possibility - Planet of the apes storyline was premised on this - Analog in spiritual practice, practicing emptiness and the Heart Sutra - form is emptiness, emptiness is form - individuality is all lost when we die and are endlessly recycled into other parts of the universe

  4. Aug 2022
  5. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. honour

      The formality of Elizabeth vs Anne walking with Charles and Mary to visit the Musgrove party.

    2. by way of doing something, as shooting was over, Charles had proposed coming with him

      poor Charles really needs entertainment - he and Mary are similar in that way

  6. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Mary, often a little unwell, and always thinking a great deal of her own complaints

      In Jane Austen the Secret Radical Helena Kelly suggests that Mary is pregnant during the course of the novel. Is Mary a hypochondriac? She is the youngest child and like Anne probably didn't get much attention (even less from her mother as she was younger when she died). Have we been unjustly maligning Mary this whole time - could she have a chronic illness? Or is it about being an extrovert and really needing to feed off other people to feel "up"?

    2. but being alone, her being unwell and out of spirits was almost a matter of course

      Is it that Mary craves attention or could it be that she's an extrovert?

  7. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Our neighbourhood cannot spare such a pleasant family

      Austen does enjoy having characters contradict themselves - see Mary's comment in the earlier part of the letter about them not improving as neighbours

    2. convenient to me

      Because her convenience is more important than an invalids. Ah Mary

    3. Mrs Harville must be an odd mother to part with them so long

      Hinting at Mary being a hypocrite. She was away from her children in Lyme and later in the letter suggests leaving them while she visits Bath

  8. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. There was never any burst of feeling, any warmth of indignation or delight, at the evil or good of others

      I think this is why we glimpse Captain Wentworth sneering at Mary when she's being a snob and rolling his eyes at Mrs Musgrove when she's grieving her useless son. We see his humanity. His is a "frank...open-hearted..eager character" who's sincerity she can depend on because he "sometimes looked or said a careless or hasty thing"

  9. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. when one drops one’s scissors

      This sounds very much like Mary purposely dropped her scissors to get his attention and it's failed

  10. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. nothing

      Mary's selfishness knows no bounds. Anne is a much more capable person and does care for Louisa, it sounds rude to refer to their connection as "nothing" it echoes how Anne's family seem to regard her. It also leaves the two unmarried women to travel unaccompanied with an unrelated male - perhaps had they appealed to Mary with her importance as a married woman they may have had success

  11. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. poetical descriptions extant of autumn

      In the 1970s miniseries (which huge hair) one of the Musgrove sisters asks Anne for an appropriate poem on this walk. In the 2022 adaptation Mary snipes at Anne when she tries to recite telling her she doesn't like poetry or it makes her sick (can anyone find the quote?)

    2. on purpose to ask us

      Mary is not good at "reading the room" and chooses to see only what is most flattering to her

    3. he dropped the arms of both to hunt after a weasel which he had a momentary glance of, and they could hardly get him along at all.

      Re-reading the novel after viewing Persuasion (2022), I was partly focused on finding the kind of comedy that Cracknell's adaptation foregrounds, which verges on slapstick at different moments, especially when Anne is involved. Anne's humor in the novel remains in the familiar realm of the satirical. But this scene with Charles Musgrove, Mary, and Anne is one of the few moments where it's possible to see some silliness in the narrative. The image of Charles chasing after this small animal to disengage himself from Mary's complaints is charming and makes him look quite silly: he is disarmed by her tenacious complaining and rather than endure them prefers to run after a small animal. The humor is turned against the couple, not at all an exemplar of marital respect. These two spouses might be found bickering but they are also conflict-averse, unable to enter into honest dialogue. The movie is inclined to giving Mary the upper hand. In the novel, Charles' possibly threatening masculinity is suggested through his persona as an avid sportsman. Hunting for weasels was not silly in and of itself at the time. These small and slender creatures had (and still do) a reputation for being ferocious predators. Thomas Bewick, who Austen would have known, describes them as follows in his A General History of Quadrupeds (1790): "The Weasel is very common, and well known in most parts of this country; is very destructive to young birds, poultry, rabbits, &c.; and is a keen devourer of eggs, which it sucks with great avidity" (219).

  12. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. new creations

      All Baronets were "created", either bought or gifted by the crown. Mary wants Sir Walter to remain superior because he's more "established"

  13. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. But I hate to hear you talking so like a fine gentleman, and as if women were all fine ladies, instead of rational creatures. We none of us expect to be in smooth water all our days

      It's unclear if Captain Wentworth honestly thinks women require more care and better accommodations or whether he is avoiding women in general because of Anne. This line of Mrs Croft's is beautiful. There is a modern web series adaptation called Rational Creatures. I think this is an echo of Mary Wollstonecraft, Austen uses the term again when Elizabeth Bennet is rejecting Mr Collins proposal (P&P chapter 19)

  14. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. I was dreadfully alarmed yesterday, but the case is very different to-day

      This echoes her sentiments when Anne arrives "I was very well yesterday; nothing at all the matter with me till this morning" (Persuasion chapter 5). Her illnesses and scares fluctuate from day to day depending on what good things she may miss out on

    2. frightened, enquiring companions, than of very useful assistants

      Foreshadowing perhaps Louisa's fall, Henrietta and Mary going into hysterics and, Anne being the only useful person

    1. The ideas expressed in Creative Experience continueto have an impact. Follett’s process of integration, for example, forms the basisof what is now commonly referred to as a ‘‘win-win’’ approach to conflictresolution; and her distinction between ‘‘power-with’’ and ‘‘power-over’’ hasbeen used by so many distinguished thinkers that it has become a part of ourpopular vocabulary. ≤

      While she may not have coined the phrase "win-win", Mary Parker Follett's process of integration described in her book Creative Experience (Longmans, Green & Co., 1924) forms the basis of what we now refer to as the idea of "win-win" conflict resolution.

      Follett's ideas about power over and power with also stem from Creative Experience as well.

      1. Those using the power-over, power-with distinction include Dorothy Emmett, the first woman president of the British Aristotelian Society, and Hannah Arendt; Mans- bridge, ‘‘Mary Parker Follet: Feminist and Negotiator,’’ xviii–xxii.

      Syndication link: - https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Win%E2%80%93win_game&type=revision&diff=1102353117&oldid=1076197356

  15. Jun 2022
    1. The course Marginalia in Books from Christopher Ohge is just crying out to have an annotated syllabus.

      Wish I could follow along directly, but there's some excellent reference material hiding in the brief outline of the course.


      Perhaps a list of interesting people here too for speaking at https://iannotate.org/ 2022 hiding in here? A session on the history of annotation and marginalia could be cool there.

    2. Jacqueline Broad (Monash University)

      Online

      Short Bio

      Jacqueline Broad is an Associate Professor of Philosophy in the School of Philosophical, Historical, and International Studies at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. She is also a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities.

      Her area of research expertise is early modern women’s philosophy. She writes on early modern theories of virtue, the ethical and religious foundations of women’s rights, historical conceptions of the self, and connections between feminism and Cartesianism in the seventeenth century.

      She has recently become Series Editor for Cambridge University Press’s new Elements series on Women in the History of Philosophy.

      Select bibliography

      • Jacqueline Broad, ‘Undoing Bayle’s Scepticism: Astell’s Marginalia as Disarmament’, in Marginal Notes: Social Reading and the Literal Margins, edited by Patrick Spedding and Paul Tankard (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2021), pp. 61–84.
    1. https://sustainingcommunity.wordpress.com/2019/02/01/4-types-of-power/#comment-122967

      Given your area, if you haven't found it yet, you might appreciate going a generation further back in your references with: Mary P. Follett. Dynamic Administration: The Collected Papers of Mary Parker Follett, ed. by E. M. Fox and L. Urwick (London: Pitman Publishing, 1940). She had some interesting work in organization theory you might appreciate. Wikipedia can give you a quick overview. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Parker_Follett#Organizational_theory

  16. Apr 2022
    1. Ann Bergin writes (in her diary with respect to [[Zoom Session 1 for The Extended Mind]]):

      She [Mary Douglas] argues that ring composition is an enabling constraint, both for storytelling and interpretation. Douglas mentions a form of parallelism in divination in ancient China based upon the symmetrical markings on either side of a turtle shell.

      This sounds quite similar to me to the work in Bascom's Sixteen Cowries which Lynne Kelly summarizes in The Memory Code when talking about West African divination systems (particularly the Yoruba) using seeds, nuts, and cowrie shells and songs which memorized songs are sung based on the outcomes of tossing these objects.

      Is there in fact a link between these storytelling/song systems? Are they functioning roughly the same way? Is there a level of recombination or statistical chance in the ring composition systems Douglas is describing? Are they similar without the combinatorial portions?


      References:

      W.R. Bascom, Sixteen Cowries: Yoruba divination from Africa to the New World, Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1980.

    2. Many famous antique texts are misunderstood and many others have been completely dismissed, all because the literary style in which they were written is unfamiliar today. So argues Mary Douglas in this controversial study of ring composition, a technique which places the meaning of a text in the middle, framed by a beginning and ending in parallel. To read a ring composition in the modern linear fashion is to misinterpret it, Douglas contends, and today’s scholars must reevaluate important antique texts from around the world.Found in the Bible and in writings from as far afield as Egypt, China, Indonesia, Greece, and Russia, ring composition is too widespread to have come from a single source. Does it perhaps derive from the way the brain works? What is its function in social contexts? The author examines ring composition, its principles and functions, in a cross-cultural way. She focuses on ring composition in Homer’s Iliad, the Bible’s book of Numbers, and, for a challenging modern example, Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy, developing a persuasive argument for reconstruing famous books and rereading neglected ones.

      Mary Douglas has a fascinating looking text on ring composition, a literary style which puts the meaning of the text in the middle and frames it with the beginning and end which are in parallel.

      Texts like the Bible, Homer, and even Tristram Shandy might be looked at from a different perspective with this lens.


      Suggested to me by Ann Bergin within the context of The Extended Mind

  17. Mar 2022
  18. Jan 2022
    1. feeding a canary-bird

      The famous opening of Northanger Abbey describes Catherine Morland “as plain as any.” Yet from the list of qualities and habits that set her against narrative expectations—the Gothic and the sentimental—and social expectations—femininity and propriety—Catherine’s character ultimately emerges as unconventional, too. In seemingly trivial and funny details, such as her preference for cricket over “feeding a canary-bird,” the narrator intimates her inconformity with dominant beliefs about the nature of women. The canary alludes to existing associations between birds and women that underscored women’s lack of rationality and their supposed vulnerability.

      In many portraits of the period, young girls were eroticized through their connection to birds, particularly when portrayed weeping for a dead pet bird, a sign of their loss of sexual innocence. Canaries, a favorite songbird in the late eighteenth-century household, were associated with young girls through their delicate size, beautiful and soft feathers, and prized songs [1]. At the same time, women’s musical abilities, as exemplified in Pride and Prejudice (1813) and Emma (1815), were a sure-fire sign of their marriageability: good singers made good wives [2]. Maturity didn’t save women from disparaging associations with birds. Spinsters were oftentimes portrayed surrounded by parrots and bird cages, the equivalent of crazy cat ladies [3]. By creating a heroine who is more likely to be found outdoors exercising than feeding a small, delicate bird, Austen disassociates Catherine from these sexist beliefs. Not all associations to birds were troubling, though. Songbirds figured in stories for young children to instill kindness toward other animals, as in Sarah Trimmer’s Fabulous Histories (1786). Austen’s contemporaries shared a strong belief that educating children to treat animals with kindness was the foundation for instilling sympathy toward other humans [4]. Yet, as Mary Wollstonecraft argued in A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792), a rational woman knew that compassion “for the bird starved in a snare” came second (or third) to compassion for her fellow humans.

      This annotation draws on research developed for a forthcoming essay which will appear in Science and Storytelling, edited by Dave Alff and Danielle Spratt.

    2. feeding a canary-bird

      The famous opening of Northanger Abbey describes Catherine Morland “as plain as any.” Yet from the list of qualities and habits that set her against narrative expectations—the Gothic and the sentimental—and social expectations—femininity and propriety—Catherine’s character ultimately emerges as unconventional, too. In seemingly trivial and funny details, such as her preference for cricket over “feeding a canary-bird,” the narrator intimates her inconformity with dominant beliefs about the nature of women. The canary alludes to existing associations between birds and women that underscored women’s lack of rationality and their supposed vulnerability.

      In many portraits of the period, young girls were eroticized through their connection to birds, particularly when portrayed weeping for a dead pet bird, a sign of their loss of sexual innocence. Canaries, a favorite songbird in the late eighteenth-century household, were associated with young girls through their delicate size, beautiful and soft feathers, and prized songs [1]. Women’s musical abilities, as exemplified in Pride and Prejudice (1813) and Emma (1815), were a sure-fire sign of their marriageability: good singers made good wives [2]. Maturity didn’t save women from disparaging associations with birds. Spinsters were oftentimes portrayed surrounded by parrots and bird cages, the equivalent of crazy cat ladies. By creating a heroine who is more likely to be found outdoors exercising than feeding a small, delicate bird, Austen disassociates Catherine from these sexist beliefs.

      Not all associations to birds were troubling, though. Songbirds figured in stories for young children to instill kindness toward other animals, as in Sarah Trimmer’s Fabulous Histories (1786). Austen’s contemporaries shared a strong belief that educating children to treat animals with kindness was the foundation for instilling sympathy toward other humans [3]. Yet, as Mary Wollstonecraft argued in A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792), a rational woman knew that compassion “for the bird starved in a snare” came second (or third) to compassion for her fellow humans.

  19. Oct 2021
    1. The Intellectual Life: Its Spirit, Conditions, Methods by A.D. Sertillanges, O.P., translated by Mary Ryan, The Newman Press, fifth printing, 1960.

    Tags

    Annotators

  20. Aug 2021
  21. Jun 2021
    1. that sometimes we don't give you know uh you know credit to or sort of like survive underneath in the subterfuge of what's happening

      you could kind of go deeper with that is um do the work of like fred moten and stephanos harney's uh black study or radical study in in the undercommons of of this idea of like um there are these molds intellectual practice you know that sometimes we don't give you know uh you know credit to or sort of like survive underneath in the subterfuge of what's happening—Christopher R. Rogers (autogenerated transcript)

      He's talking about work (scholarship) that may sit outside the mainstream that for one reason or another aren't recognized (in this case, because the scholars are marginalized in a culture mired in racist ideas, colonialism, etc.). At it's roots, it doesn't necessarily make the work any more or less valuable than that in

      cf. with the academic samizdat of Vladimir Bukovsky who was working under a repressive Russian government

      cf similarly with the work of Thomas Kuhn in The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.

      Consensus can very often only be consensus until it isn't.

      How do these ideas interoperate with those of power (power over and power with)? One groups power over another definitely doesn't make them right (or just) at the end of the day.

      I like the word "undercommons", which could be thought of not in a marginalizing way, but in the way of a different (and possibly better) perspective.

    1. In the lawsuit, the Reids and their attorney are said to argue that WMG has refused to terminate its copyright ownership of the band's early work, including their 1985 debut album Psychocandy. The Reids are asking WMG for at least $2.5 million in damages, and refer to Section 203 of the Copyright Act of 1976 in their lawsuit.

      I remember an interview with Jim in the late 1990s where he said the if you threw a brick into a Warner building, there'd be no risk of hitting someone who cares for music.

  22. May 2021
    1. Which brings us back, once again, to the question with which we began: why does it matter who gets to be seen as a prominent “tech critic”? The answer is that it matters because such individuals get to set the bounds for the discussion.

      The ability to set the bounds of the discussion or the problem is a classical example of "power-over" instead of power-with or power-to.

  23. Jul 2020
    1. Carmen Guerrero fatally stabbed his live-in girlfriend Mary Perkins with her 14 year old daughter in the home. Corcoran, August 24th, 1995

      Article text reads:

      Woman is fatally stabbed in Corcoran

      A Corcoran woman was fatally stabbed Thursday night, apparently during a domestic dispute. Mary Perkins, 38, of Corcoran was pronounced dead from multiple stab wounds at Corcoran District Hospital after Corcoran police responded to a call from the couples 14-year-old daughter at the residence at 1 1:17 p.m. The incident occurred in an apartment at 920 6V2 Avenue on the east side in Corcoran. Police found the suspect still at the crime scene and made an arrest. Carmen Guerrero, 30, was booked on a murder charge into the Kings County Jail at 2:30 a.m. Bail is set at 100,000. Guerrero reportedly confessed to the crime, police said. The victim and suspect lived together, according to Corcoran police, and the homicide is believed to be the result of a domestic dispute. No further details were available.

    2. Carmen Guerrero sentenced to 15 years to life for stabbing his girlfriend to death while her 14 year old daughter was in the home.

      Article text reads:

      Guerrero gets 15 years to life

      PERVIN LAKDA WALLA Sentinel Staff Writer

      Frank Vidana told a Kings County Superior Court judge this morning how his niece cries in the middle of the night for her mother, Mary Perkins, who was killed last year. Carmen Guerrero, 30, who pleaded guilty to the murder, stood beside his court-appointed lawyer. He did not react to Vidanas comments. He was received a sentence of 15 years to life in prison. Vidana said Perkins was his youngest sister and one of 10 siblings. Her death has ripped a hole in the family that will never be repaired and taken a mother away from a child, he said. Vidana came to court with four other family members. They accompanied by Eva Murillo of the county probation departments victim witness program. The program lends emotional assistance, among other functions, to crime victims. Guerrero's lawyer, Donna Tarter, told the court that he is very remorseful. Tarter said she knew that Guerrero's plea to second-degree murder allowed the imposition of only a 15 years-to-life imprisonment sentence. However, she said, the court could consider probation. Tarter said that it appears a psychological problem led Guerrero to the killing. Guerrero, 31, was convicted of stabbing Perkins, 38, during a domestic dispute in their apartment at 920 61-2 Avenue in Corcoran. The incident occurred Aug. 24, 1995. Police found Guerrero at the scene and arrested him there. He reportedly confessed to the crime soon afterward. Guerrero and Perkins had lived together prior to the killing, according to Corcoran police. Their 14-year-old daughter who lived with them in the apartment called police that night. Kings County Superior Court Judge Peter Schultz denied probation. "The act of murder in this case is certainly an impulsive one, (but) it certainly shows a disregard for human life." Guerrero also was ordered to pay $1,000 in restitution to the state and $1,500 restitution to Vidana as repayment for funeral expenses. Guerrero was awarded 287 days credit for time already served in custody and for good behavior.

  24. Dec 2019
    1. she desired permission to address the court

      Women were not allowed to address the court or testify in criminal cases unless there were special circumstances, including in the United States. The legal silencing of women in law courts was discussed in Mary Wollstonecraft's The Wrongs of Woman (published posthumously by William Godwin in 1798).

  25. Jul 2019
    1. Job says: “The ear trieth words, as the mouth tasteth meat.
    2. the universe, including man and his divine Principle, is harmonious and eternal.
    3. 1. God is All in all. 2. God is good. Good is Mind. 3. God, Spirit, being all, nothing is matter. 4. Life, God, omnipotent Good, deny death, evil, sin, disease. — Disease, sin, evil, death, deny Good, omnipotent God, Life.
    4. The vital part, the heart and Soul of Christian Science, is Love.
    5. there is no pain in Truth, and no truth Inversions. in pain; no nerve in Mind, and no mind in nerve; no matter in Mind, and no mind in matter; no matter in Life, and no life in matter; no matter in Good, and no good in matter.
    6. The Principle of Divine Metaphysics is God; its practice is the power of Truth over error; its rules demonstrate Science.
    7. the awful unreality called evil.
    8. omnipotence, omnipresence, omniscience, — Spirit possessing all power, God's allness learned. filling all space, constituting all Science
    9. I knew the Principle of all harmonious Mind-action to be God
    10. the only realities are the divine Mind Scientific evidence. and idea.
    11. this same mind calls matter, thereby shutting out the true sense of Spirit.
    12. the opposite of Truth — called error, sin, sickness, disease, death — is the false testimony of false material sense; that this false sense evolves, in belief, a subjective state of mortal mind, which this same mind calls matter, thereby shutting out the true sense of Spirit.
    13. Life, Truth, and Love are all-powerful and ever-present
    14. Feeling so perpetually the false consciousness that life inheres in the body, yet remembering that God is A divine discontent. really our Life, we may well tremble, in the prospect of those days wherein we must say, “I have no pleasure in them.”
    15. the revelation of Immanuel, the everpresent God
    16. the demonstrable fact that matter possesses neither sensation nor life;
    17. all real Being is in the divine Mind and idea
  26. May 2019
    1. Jesus and Mary Chain

      From Wikipedia:

      The Jesus and Mary Chain are a Scottish alternative rock band formed in East Kilbride in 1983. The band revolves around the songwriting partnership of brothers Jim and William Reid. After signing to independent label Creation Records, they released their first single "Upside Down" in 1984. Their debut album Psychocandy was released to critical acclaim in 1985 on major label WEA. The band went on to release five more studio albums before disbanding in 1999. They reunited in 2007.

  27. Mar 2018
    1. philter--a philter

      Etymology Italian filtro (1598 as philtro in senses 1 and 2). With sense 2 compare slightly earlier philtrum Philtrum- Etymology: < classical Latin philtrum love-potion, in post-classical Latin also groove in the upper lip below the nostrils (1587 in a British source) < ancient Greek ϕίλτρον love-charm, love-potion, charm, spell, in Hellenistic Greek also dimple in the upper lip < ϕιλ- , stem of ϕιλεῖν to love

      Definition of Philter

      1. A potion, drug, or (occasionally) charm supposed to be capable of exciting sexual attraction or love, esp. towards a particular person; a love potion. Also, more generally: any potion or drug having supposedly magical properties. Also fig. (source Oxford English Dictionary)
    2. alembics
      1. Chem. An early apparatus used for distilling, consisting of two connected vessels, a typically gourd-shaped cucurbit (cucurbit n.1 1) containing the substance to be distilled, and a receiver or flask in which the condensed product is collected. Occasionally also: spec. the lid or head (head n.1 19f) of the cucurbit together with its tube or beak which connects the two vessels. Now hist. (from Oxford English Dictionary)
    1. facial products that work miracles for acne.

      Why suddenly this specific example? Do you mean it as an example? If so, say so... And explain what it exemplifies

    2. coincide

      Is this the right word here? What does "coincide" mean?

  28. Oct 2017
  29. Sep 2017
    1. This is the story of 16th century Europe, and the political earthquake that was protestantism. The overarching historical narrative unfolds around the lives of fictional characters who might have lived in this historic period.

      Follett's literary reenactment explores the intricacies of the Protestant Reformation through a cast of strategically diverse characters, whose stories span across multiple continents, nations, and cities. Each character is an important harbinger of larger historical trends. Within the masterfully established geo-political reality, each of their decisions serve to gradually reveal their distinct personalities and temperaments, belief systems and ideologies, and cultural identities.

  30. Apr 2017
    1. "When I was a child my father had a slave who taught me to pray the Christian prayer in my own language, and told me many things about Lela Marien. The Christian died, and I know that she did not go to the fire, but to Allah, because since then I have seen her twice, and she told me to go to the land of the Christians to see Lela Marien, who had great love for me. I know not how to go. I have seen many Christians, but except thyself none has seemed to me to be a gentleman. I am young and beautiful, and have plenty of money to take with me. See if thou canst contrive how we may go, and if thou wilt thou shalt be my husband there, and if thou wilt not it will not distress me, for Lela Marien will find me some one to marry me. I myself have written this: have a care to whom thou givest it to read: trust no Moor, for they are all perfidious. I am greatly troubled on this account, for I would not have thee confide in anyone, because if my father knew it he would at once fling me down a well and cover me with stones. I will put a thread to the reed; tie the answer to it, and if thou hast no one to write for thee in Arabic, tell it to me by signs, for Lela Marien will make me understand thee. She and Allah and this cross, which I often kiss as the captive bade me, protect thee."

      Davary also mentions that Mary is very well revered in muslim society especially amongst women. This conflicts with the author's words that Zoraida was introduced to Mary through a christian slave of her fathers. Zoraida most likely was exposed to the Virgin her entire life, even before the slave that introduced to her christian prayer.

    2. "When I was a child my father had a slave who taught me to pray the Christian prayer in my own language, and told me many things about Lela Marien. The Christian died, and I know that she did not go to the fire, but to Allah, because since then I have seen her twice, and she told me to go to the land of the Christians to see Lela Marien, who had great love for me. I know not how to go. I have seen many Christians, but except thyself none has seemed to me to be a gentleman. I am young and beautiful, and have plenty of money to take with me. See if thou canst contrive how we may go, and if thou wilt thou shalt be my husband there, and if thou wilt not it will not distress me, for Lela Marien will find me some one to marry me. I myself have written this: have a care to whom thou givest it to read: trust no Moor, for they are all perfidious. I am greatly troubled on this account, for I would not have thee confide in anyone, because if my father knew it he would at once fling me down a well and cover me with stones. I will put a thread to the reed; tie the answer to it, and if thou hast no one to write for thee in Arabic, tell it to me by signs, for Lela Marien will make me understand thee. She and Allah and this cross, which I often kiss as the captive bade me, protect thee."

      Davary,Bahar. "Mary in Islam: No Man Could Have Been Like This Women." pp. 26-34.

      Bahar mentions in his journal article that the Virgin Mary is actually mentioned in the Quran by name ten times more than in the Bible. Possibly Cervantes is not aware of Quranic texts?

  31. Mar 2017
  32. Jun 2015
    1. there is a powerful impact on growth and self awareness when students can see their own development in speaking, in writing, in thinking and problem solving.

      So it all comes back to self-directed learning again. As I've begun to think about this competency in our school, I've thought about how this might be something that is intertwined with all other competencies. In plain language, this might mean that students are always pulling back holding up a mirror (or taking a snapshot) of their learning/journey.

    2. The kind of work assigned thus makes a big difference. If students have only been asked to write in one mode or to one type of audience (or no audience except the implied teacher as audience), their portfolios will provide less opportunity to find direction.

      This is real, and perhaps, a bit understated. When students are doing worksheets, filling in blanks, how can we ask them use them for self-expression (sonnet), self-reflection (mirror) or for making a plan (map).

      But then, does this mean that we have to spend more time on creating conditions and projects for meaningful work before working on portfolios? Probably not, but this does remind me of how much gets revealed because of portfolios.

      Seeing what's not there yet -- in our own curriculum -- is a big reason why teachers resist student portfolios, I think.

    3. Criteria for performance, such as the Alverno criteria for speaking across the curriculum guide the interaction between student and teacher.

      The purpose of criteria is not about judgment or meeting standards, it's a precursor for conversation or interaction between teacher and student.

    4. Using explicit criteria, the student develops the ability to look at her own work and determine the strengths and weaknesses evident in a particular performance or across a set of performances. She begins to set goals to address the areas she needs to develop and to deepen her areas of strength.

      The obvious paradox here is that the more "explicit" and digestible (student friendly) our criteria, the more a student can be independent in assessing her own work. That's a wonderful tension between top-down criteria and bottom-up assessment.

    5. That power is unleashed when teachers see the portfolio process as dependent upon the clarity of goals for student performance through their work in the liberal arts and professional education curriculum; when they attend to the quality of the assignments, projects and assessments that they provide for their students; and when they take the responsibility for teaching students the process of reflection and self assessment.

      That's a lot to throw in here at the end. It does make me wonder about how focusing too much on assessment might become the tail wagging the dog, if you know what I mean. Because ultimately it gets back to working together to create quality assignments and teaching the process of self-directed learning.

  33. May 2015
    1. "What connections can I make between what I'm learning in one class with what rm learning in another?" ""What questions do I have about my learning?"

      Versions of these questions would be good for us to consider in our portfolio panels.