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  1. Last 7 days
  2. Nov 2022
    1. JohnPhilpin I have read a number of questions from people in different communities I am part of, asking for Podcast recommendations. I don’t think it is an easy question to answer. 1) There are millions of these puppies 2) Because I like something doesn’t mean you will 3) My recommendations this week might be different next - because 'moods' 4) and and and I wrote this post as a starting point. Happy to share my current OPML with anyone who wants it - add a comment below - or email me. Happy to offer my thoughts on what you might like if I know more about what you like. I won't typically offer BIG NAME podcasts.

      https://micro.blog/JohnPhilpin/14165886

      @JohnPhilpin Recommendations can often come cheap, particularly on iTunes where everyone begs for reviews. I prefer hearing about what people actually listened to. What did you invest your time in/on? This is why I sporadically maintain what I call a faux-cast or a feed of podcasts and audio I've actually listened to: https://boffosocko.com/2018/03/08/podcasts-of-things-ive-listened-to-or-want-to-listen-to/

  3. Oct 2022
  4. Sep 2022
  5. Aug 2022
  6. Jun 2022
  7. Apr 2022
    1. baseball

      For a long time, Austen's use of the word baseball in Northanger Abbey was cited as its first appearance in the English language. But as this episode from the podcast The Thing About Austen explains, this was a mistake. Co-hosts Zan Cammack (she/her) and Diane Neu (she/her) address past speculation regarding Austen's role in the invention of this word, while providing illuminating historical context about Regency sports (Did Austen's contemporaries play baseball?), gender (Was it socially acceptable for women to play cricket and baseball?), and the supposed "all-American" game (If it was common in Britain, when did baseball makes its way into American national identity?).!

  8. Feb 2022
    1. “This American Life” and “Radiolab,” and maybe narrative podcasting as a form, are inspiresting.

      I agree -- they're larely without substance but "interesting" and "inspiring". Which is not necessarily a bad thing.

  9. Oct 2021
  10. theliturgists.com theliturgists.com
    1. THE SUNDAY THING

      The Sunday Thing

      The love of money is the root of all evil

      This week, Michael Gungor asked us to discuss money in our breakout groups.

      Money is power

      We outsource our power and authority to those who claim to have greater access to capital, because we underestimate and undervalue our own social influence, economic capacity, and political agency. The entreprecariat is designed for learned helplessness (social: individualism), trained incapacities (economic: specialization), and bureaucratic intransigence (political: authoritarianism). https://hypothes.is/a/667dOC0bEeyV6Itx3ySxmw

      Indigenous cultures in Canada were disempowered by outlawing the cultural practice of generosity (potlatch) and replacing the practice with centralized power over the medium of exchange: money. Money is a mechanism of disempowerment.

      Money is a shared story we tell ourselves about what has value. https://www.npr.org/transcripts/795246685

      We translated “ekklesia” as church. It is the deliberative body of the experiment in democracy in Athens, Greece. The people who are figuring out how to live together in the commons. The work of the people. The Liturgists.


      The Story of Money

      In this hour, On the Media looks at the story of money, from its uncertain origins to its digital reinvention in the form of cryptocurrency.

      On the Media: Full Faith & Credit


      Squid Game

      People were also discussing Squid Game.

      Squid Game was on my mind today before the call. “The reality of the history of Canada’s mining industry makes #SquidGame look like child’s play.” https://twitter.com/bauhouse/status/1449726452098682881?s=20

      The truth is that all of the gold that was mined out of the Klondike was under Indigenous land. There was no treaty with any of Indigenous peoples in the Yukon.

      Commons: Mining

    1. In this hour, On the Media looks at the story of money, from its uncertain origins to its digital reinvention in the form of cryptocurrency.

      The Story of Money

      Ten autumns ago came two watershed moments in the history of money. In September 2008, the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers triggered a financial meltdown from which the world has yet to fully recover. The following month, someone using the name Satoshi Nakamoto introduced BitCoin, the first cryptocurrency. Before our eyes, the very architecture of money was evolving — potentially changing the world in the process. In this hour, On the Media looks at the story of money, from its uncertain origins to its digital reinvention in the form of cryptocurrency.

    1. The reality of the history of Canada’s mining industry makes #SquidGame look like child’s play.

      “The truth is that all of the gold that was mined out of the Klondike was under Indigenous land. There was no treaty with any of the Indigenous peoples in the Yukon.”

      “That land was stolen by the Canadian state and that gold was whisked away by private interests. The Federal Government only signed land claims with Indigenous peoples in the Yukon in the 1990s, but by that point, almost all the gold had been mined out of the ground.”

      “The Klondike gold rush was a rolling disaster that captured tens of thousands of people. When the first European explorers came to the Americas, they came here looking for gold. In the 1890s, that lust for precious metals eventually led men to the farthest reaches of this continent.”

      “Today, instead of 100,000 people descending on a small patch of land, you have large corporations digging treasures out of the ground. But the legacies these mining operations leave behind are just like what happened in the Klondike: workers with broken bodies, environmental destruction, the dispossession of Indigenous land, sexual violence. The gold rushes never stopped. They just morphed into something different.”

    1. When gold was discovered in the Yukon, 100,000 people desperately tried to make it to a small patch of land in one of the most remote environments on the continent. Few made it all the way. The Klondike Gold Rush was many things: a media conspiracy, a ponzi scheme, a land grab. But above all, it was a humanitarian disaster that stretched over much of the Pacific Northwest.

      “The truth is that all of the gold that was mined out of the Klondike was under Indigenous land. There was no treaty with any of the Indigenous peoples in the Yukon.”

      “That land was stolen by the Canadian state and that gold was whisked away by private interests. The Federal Government only signed land claims with Indigenous peoples in the Yukon in the 1990s, but by that point, almost all the gold had been mined out of the ground.”

      “The Klondike gold rush was a rolling disaster that captured tens of thousands of people. When the first European explorers came to the Americas, they came here looking for gold. In the 1890s, that lust for precious metals eventually led men to the farthest reaches of this continent.”

      “Today, instead of 100,000 people descending on a small patch of land, you have large corporations digging treasures out of the ground. But the legacies these mining operations leave behind are just like what happened in the Klondike: workers with broken bodies, environmental destruction, the dispossession of Indigenous land, sexual violence. The gold rushes never stopped. They just morphed into something different.”

      Canada is Fake

      “Canada is not an accident or a work in progress or a thought experiment. I mean that Canada is a scam — a pyramid scheme, a ruse, a heist. Canada is a front. And it’s a front for a massive network of resource extraction companies, oil barons, and mining magnates.”

    1. Free upload and storage. It’s the simplest way to get started with podcasting.
    1. Design for Resilience is not a podcast just for professional designers. This a podcast for human beings, who may have forgotten that they are creative. We build our personal resilience by first remembering that we are all designers.

      I just published my first podcast episode.

  11. builderscollective.com builderscollective.com
    1. A podcast about resilience inspired Caleb Chan to compose this theme music, incorporating a heartbeat and a world music influence.

      Design for Resilience

      Exploring how we imagine, design, and build the future together.

    1. Exploring how we imagine, design, and build the future together.

      A podcast about resilience inspired Caleb Chan to compose this theme music, incorporating a heartbeat and a world music influence.

    1. Apple Podcasts for Creators

      Today, I am learning about podcasting. Where to start? How about Apple?

      First, sign up as an individual, Stephen Bau, under the company name, Builders Collective.

      We're setting up your account.

      This could take up to a day, so check back later. When we're finished, you can start adding shows.


      I wonder why people use foot marks rather than apostrophes in their typography. Apple, you should know better.


      Minutes Later

      There's nothing here — yet.

      You haven't added any shows yet. Click Add Show to get started.


      Choose a Show Type

      You can publish a show on Apple Podcasts with or without an RSS feed, so the first step is to pick the type of show you want to distribute. Note that you’ll be able to add paid subscriber audio to either kind of show.

      Add a show with an RSS feed

      Your show will be available on Apple Podcasts or anywhere you distribute your RSS feed. This is the best option if you want to manage episodes through your podcast hosting provider.

      Add a show without an RSS feed

      Your show will only be available on Apple Podcasts. This is the best option if you want to manage episodes in Apple Podcasts Connect and offer a subscription.

    1. journalism historian David Mindich

      The View from Somewhere

      Hallin’s spheres

      At 11 minutes into this podcast episode, David Mindich provides an overview of Hallin’s spheres.

      Hallin divides the world of political discourse into three concentric spheres: consensus, legitimate controversy, and deviance. In the sphere of consensus, journalists assume everyone agrees. The sphere of legitimate controversy includes the standard political debates, and journalists are expected to remain neutral. The sphere of deviance falls outside the bounds of legitimate debate, and journalists can ignore it. These boundaries shift, as public opinion shifts.

      Wikipedia: Hallin's spheres

      I learned about this podcast from Sandy and Nora in their episode, Canada’s democratic deficit.

    1. The podcast focuses on the troubled history of “objectivity” and how it has been used to gatekeep and exclude people of color, queer and trans people, and people organizing for their labor rights and communities.

      I learned about this podcast through Sandy and Nora.

    1. Where philosophy meets tech.

      Design Philosophy

      This seems to be the space that I occupy on the edges of design education and practice.

      Maria Selting of Unbox Your World podcast has just shared the raw audio of our conversation to get feedback before she publishes the episode, Redesigning Design: Applying UX Principles to Design a Better Future.

    1. The Edge Effects podcast features interviews with scholars, scientists, activists, and artists who engage with questions of environmental and cultural change.
    1. Literally everyone is just following orders from the machine.

      Fascist Architecture

      See Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil by Hannah Arendt.

      “It spells out so clearly that Nazi Germany’s worst atrocities and many atrocities the world over were not only the ideas of singular evil men. They were supported and enacted by systems, by groups of people who woke up in the morning and went to offices to work on it.”

      — Avery Trufelman, Nice Try! Podcast

    1. Magazine of the Bauhaus Movement

      On September 8, 2021, I received an email from Orhan Cakir, Managing Director, Bauhaus Movement:

      Dear Stephen…

      I wanted to let you know that from November we will be publishing the Bauhaus Movement Magazine every 3 months. I would like to have an interview with you and your activities regarding the Bauhaus in Canada. The magazine is published in several languages and regions. Can you imagine a collaboration?

    1. Drilled, her climate change podcast, is in its sixth season, with more than a million downloads.

      I am inspired by Amy Westervelt’s deep exploration of the history of public relations, advertising, and marketing to polish the reputations of billionaires and fossil fuel corporations in her podcast, Drilled.

    1. I recently found this book at Value Village while exploring the non-fiction books section. What caught my eye was the back cover’s reference to Sallie McFague. I learned about Sallie McFague from Tripp Fuller’s podcast, Homebrewed Christianity, when she died. He dedicated an episode to her influence. Her name also came up in conversation with Sophia at the Faith, Arts + Culture course at Bez Arts Hub.

      When I read the title of the article, *The World as God’s Body,” I decided to purchase the book. I have been exploring this theme as it relates to the Gaia hypothesis in articles such as, A Prayer for the Earth.

    1. Bauhaus Podcast

      Let’s shape our future, together.

      The Bauhaus Podcast is a place for creative thinking We officially announce the launch of our new Bauhaus Podcast.

      This podcast, where experts, users and professionals share their practical knowledge and experiences, is entirely dedicated to Bauhaus architecture, design and science in all its facets.

    1. The Daily is part of my ritual of learning through long-form journalism in an audio format what is top of mind for many Americans. I was raised on American exceptionalism that was piped into Canada through several media channels: TV, radio, music, books, movies, etc.

      Jacques Ellul called this Propaganda and The Technological Society.

    1. Because at the end of the day, all structures are, in some ways, ideology made manifest.

      Avery Trufelman ends her podcast series, Nice Try! with these words in an episode entitled, Germania: Architecture in a Fascist Utopia.

      One person’s utopia is another person’s dystopia.

      The structure of the mind becomes the architecture of our reality. This thought became the foundation for a mental model for human experience, since these architectural plans for utopia seem like good ideas on paper, but when we live inside these structure in our daily reality, we realize that we have constructed our own mental prisons, the iron cage envisioned by Max Weber.

    2. It spells out so clearly that Nazi Germany’s worst atrocities and many atrocities the world over were not only the ideas of singular evil men. They were supported and enacted by systems, by groups of people who woke up in the morning and went to offices to work on it.

      Avery Trufelman ends her podcast series, Nice Try! with these words in an episode entitled, Germania: Architecture in a Fascist Utopia.

  12. Sep 2021
    1. I was wondering if anyone had thought to explore the idea of podcasts as a source of ethnographic or user experience research. Instead, I found a case study about the user experience of podcast listening.

  13. Aug 2021
    1. https://mentalpivot.com/solutions-for-taking-notes-when-listening-to-podcasts/

      I definitely need a better way of doing this myself. Not a fan of paying $5/month for NoteCast. Airr is iOS only.

      Sharing the link from the app with timecode seems the best, but it would be nice to have the transcription piece as well.

  14. Jul 2021
    1. Highlight & share the best moments from podcasts

      This could be interesting for annotating and sharing data from podcasting. Sadly nothing for Android yet.

      via https://youtu.be/wB89lJs5A3s?t=8126

  15. Jun 2021
  16. Apr 2021
  17. Mar 2021
    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Jeremy Cherfas</span> in IndieWeb chat (<time class='dt-published'>03/11/2021 14:46:39</time>)</cite></small>

  18. Oct 2020
    1. I don’t want to build yet another Podcast player app. I don’t want to trap listeners to Listen Notes. You come to Listen Notes and find the Podcasts or Podcast Episodes that you want to listen, then you leave Listen Notes to use your favorite Podcast player app to listen. Under this principle, Listen Notes shows RSS & brings traffic back to official websites of Podcasts. Many Podcast-related sites don’t show RSS, because they want to build a walled garden to make visitors stay there as long as possible.
    1. Podcast listening can be harder to crack. There are so many shows! How do you find the ones you’ll like? And once you’ve found a show, where do you start: with the most recent episode? At the beginning? Some specific gem of an episode buried deep in the back catalog?

      Perhaps start with making the RSS feeds easily discoverable?! I just spent 20 minutes doing some reasonably serious web gymnastics to extract the RSS feed for Caliphate (https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/podcasts/caliphate-isis-rukmini-callimachi.html) out of the iTunes feed using a JSON request tactic. Why can't the podcast's main page have or advertise the raw RSS feed?!

  19. Jan 2019
    1. Seeing White. Recommended by a reader, this 14-part series on race and whiteness is essential listening.*

      This is also one of the best things I consumed this past year.

  20. Jul 2018
    1. People can post about what they’re actively listening to (either on their personal websites or via podcast apps that could report the percentage of the episode listened to) and send “listen” Webmentions to pages for podcasts or other audio content.

      At some point, I'd love to have this built in automatically. I listen to (too many) podcasts and audiobooks. I'd like to have this automatically create a "Listen" post on my site.

  21. Sep 2017
    1. Their path to that goal just looks—well, sounds—a bit different. It’s less a reinvention of the wheel, more a technological advancement. “The successful long-form print piece, the successful television documentary, the successful podcast will all be built around storytelling and narratives of people who are affected by what’s being investigated,” says Stephen Smith, executive editor and host of APM Reports.

      The medium will change, the basics of journalism and storytelling have not. Now all we need is CNN to do more storytelling and use AJ+ for some source material.

  22. Jun 2017
  23. Jul 2016
    1. Hello. This is my first entry. Dario and I plan to create a podcast that has three elements:

      1) A formal exploration of the podcast form using our own podcast as a case study. 2) A discussion around academic research and the podcast. 3) A discussion around the 'disruptive journal' featuring input from JMP contributors.

      The aim is to construct a text that operates as a viable and valid piece of research and also is reflexive regarding the changing nature of academic research.

      We will be talking in person late July following some leave and will be emailing disruptive JMP participants shortly to invite them to participate.

      For now I listening to podcasts to prepare, and recommend the latest NPR Invisibilia episode on problem solving, and any episode of the brilliant Longford Podcast.