620 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2022
  2. Oct 2022
  3. Sep 2022
    1. Find out what's happening in Community Meetup groups around the world and start meeting up with the ones near you.

      880 community groups on meetup

    1. I felt like I’d unlocked a new level of Islanderhood by simple proximity

      Are there endless layers of 'belonging' to a place and community? Does the onion have an actual core? If you're not born somewhere, and you're family doesn't go back n generations? Vgl noaberschap insider/buitenstaander Twente, en parallel de gesloten ondernemerskring met de rug naar de wereld buiten Twente. Vgl 'Haar uit Dirksland' die al 60 jaar in Middelharnis woonde. Vgl. Wanneer zeg je dat je geworteld bent in Amersfoort? Mbt Enschede was er de overgang student/stadsbewoner, en na vertrek de vaststelling dat je mensen kent in een stad niet omdat je ze kent maar omdat ze er net als jij al zo lang rondlopen, en daarom groet je elkaar.

    1. But the library? In this country, they’re oases in a desert of social infrastructure. In many regions they’re more than functional, people rely on them. It’s part of their routine. It’s a safe haven for anyone, literally anyone, to use.

      Libraries are community centers, public infrastructure. Vgl the networked agency work with Fers regional libraries in Fryslan "Impact Through Connection" https://www.zylstra.org/blog/2017/03/more-fun-than-annual-class-trip-making-at-school-some-first-observations/

  4. Aug 2022
    1. Chadeau-Hyam, M., Wang, H., Eales, O., Haw, D., Bodinier, B., Whitaker, M., Walters, C. E., Ainslie, K. E. C., Atchison, C., Fronterre, C., Diggle, P. J., Page, A. J., Trotter, A. J., Ashby, D., Barclay, W., Taylor, G., Cooke, G., Ward, H., Darzi, A., … Elliott, P. (2022). SARS-CoV-2 infection and vaccine effectiveness in England (REACT-1): A series of cross-sectional random community surveys. The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, 0(0). https://doi.org/10.1016/S2213-2600(21)00542-7

    1. Also, your issue isn't feeling exhausted due to "not being with smart people in a room".  Those same smart people are on Zoom.  Your issue is the overabundance of meetings and zoom fatigue.

      There's also some cherry picking here (in Kim's original piece). I love a good F2F meeting, but let's remember "conference room fatigue". Some gatherings of smart people consume more energy than they produce. (Like "zoom fatigue" sometimes it's the affordances of the room - bad lighting, uncomfortable chairs, etc - and sometimes it's because of behavior in the meeting.)

    2. You can have the illusion that watercooler talk "just happens," hence cultivating a community seems seamless in a F2F context, but you're really not examining the factors that lead you there, and how's privileged.

      Enormously important. Thought exercise: who is left out of your "seamless" interactions because of design factors like space and time? (And that's before we even get into the questions of for whom a community is cultivated.)

  5. Jul 2022
    1. The goal of this project is to have a single gem that contains all the helper methods needed to resize and process images. Currently, existing attachment gems (like Paperclip, CarrierWave, Refile, Dragonfly, ActiveStorage, and others) implement their own custom image helper methods. But why? That's not very DRY, is it? Let's be honest. Image processing is a dark, mysterious art. So we want to combine every great idea from all of these separate gems into a single awesome library that is constantly updated with best-practice thinking about how to resize and process images.
    1. i framed this this r d program that is it's conceptual at the 00:07:18 time it's not funded yet you know i'm hoping that we can secure funds but i frame it as a partnership between this global science community and local communities 00:07:29 so it's very so dialogue with the public and within the science community and among interested stakeholders is extremely important in this um i i i 00:07:42 you know to me science has a role in in such a r d program because science is really the you know the where we would turn to answer some really difficult questions like if you wanted to build a simulation 00:07:56 model of how environmental or environmental or economic uh outcomes might be given you know a b c and d well then you know that's a that's a technical those are technical questions 00:08:08 um if you're if you're asking how can we measure how can what kind of metrics are reasonable for environmental and social well-being 00:08:23 those are largely scientific questions you know the math can be complicated for example but the questions of you know how do what do we want what do people want 00:08:36 how how how do they want their light you know how do they want to live their lives in in society those are questions for you know for the public and for communities especially 00:08:49 um i i the the intention of the r d program is not to develop one size fits all solution you know to trial it in a local community and then spread it everywhere that's not at all 00:09:02 the idea the idea is that this is an ongoing learning process a true partnership between uh local communities and the science and the science community and there would be just a million sorts 00:09:15 of you know experiments that one might might might run uh to to improve the kinds of societal systems that we have 00:09:27 or that were you know that we're proposing uh develop a new system try it out see how it works gather data you know do another experiment uh all within the partnership of at with 00:09:39 local communities at the local community level i think maybe you know i since i know this stuff

      This project is a collaboration between the global scientific community and local communities to improve societal systems. It's not a one-size-fits-all process, but many different experiments.

      Dialogue is a critical component of this process.

      Tipping Point Festival and SRG strategy is well aligned with Science-driven societal transformation ethos: second order science combined with local communities as the building block of civilization AND cosmolocal networking (https://clreader.net) via Indyweb interpersonal computing.

    2. so number one uh societal transformation is necessary if we're to avoid catastroph catastrophe and maintain and improve social and ecological well-being 00:18:00 that's the starting that's this that's where this whole thing starts that's something that's transformation is necessary number two uh one kind of societal transformation is is a science driven transformation 00:18:13 you know you can imagine all kinds of there could be war uh revolution could be a a type of of transformation and i'm not talking about revolution here i'm talking about a science-driven 00:18:24 evidence-based uh development of and migration to fundamentally new systems so we're talking about dinovo de novo design from scratch right this is so we're not 00:18:38 improving uh capitalism for example or represented democracy where we're looking at conceivable de novo designs that might be fit or among the most 00:18:52 fit of all possible designs number three is uh now um you know if i were a genius which which i'm not but if i were a genius and i came up with the 00:19:05 greatest plan that everyone could you know we could rearrange society according to this you know this design uh if there were no way to a practical way to implement that then i would have been wasting my time 00:19:19 so a big part of this series is actually especially paper number two is really focused on what what is a how could this actually be done in the real world how can how can you do this 00:19:32 um so i i claim at least that there is a viable and affordable uh way to go about transformation that within a reasonable span of time 00:19:44 uh and i and i when i consider 50 a 50-year program here to be a reasonable span of time transformation could spread to near global levels so um you know we're talking about a 00:19:57 concerted effort over a long period of time to reach a global scale change but that does not mean that no change happens until the 49th year it means that change happens 00:20:11 exponentially fast so maybe in the first few years there's you know there's not a lot going on but it goes exponentially fast from there and those communities local communities that participate in this 00:20:24 r d program would be obviously be the first to reap the benefits uh number four the and this is maybe one of the key world view aspects of this paper number one is all 00:20:37 about world view the proposed program views society as a cognitive organism and its societal systems as a cognitive architecture so you know that 00:20:50 if indeed society is a cognitive organism and ours and our systems are part of the cognitive architecture that already lends itself to ideas of how you might measure fitness now you're starting 00:21:02 we're starting to get an idea of what is a system supposed to do so we'll be getting more into that today number five the intrinsic purpose of a society now obviously if we're going to 00:21:17 build a new system we have to know for what is a new system supposed to do like what is an economic system supposed to do what is a governance system supposed to do what is the what is the purpose of them so uh uh 00:21:30 purpose is also a big part of the world view in the first paper and the i one of the points of the fifth point is that the intrinsic purpose of a society of societal uh cognition and thus also of societal 00:21:42 systems is to achieve and sustainably maintain social and economic ecological viability and vitality probably broadly defined now if you're listening carefully and 00:21:55 you're of the active inference persuasion you'll you'll already see active inference in here when i talk when we talk about um sustainably maintain that means and 00:22:07 anticipation of the future all right uh i also say here the cognition is largely focused on reducing the uncertainty that our intrinsic purpose will be successfully fulfilled 00:22:22 now and in the expected future so uh again we have a concept from active inference that is uncertainty um the cognitive view opens up many new opportunities for research 00:22:35 and and i feel like this view is really critical if we are to truly uh have some kind of of 00:22:46 optimally beneficial societal systems and uh number seven the last one this proposed r d program like i already mentioned it represents uh it's conceptual now but it represents a partnership 00:23:03 between local communities and the global science community um and the you know neither of those are monolithic the global science 00:23:15 community is you know it was a whatever however you might want to envision it a hundred labs or a thousand labs around the world or individual researchers or groups of researcher teams interdisciplinary teams at one 00:23:28 institution teams across institutions that is what i'm that is really who i'm speaking i'm in the in this series i'm speaking to the science world and i'm 00:23:38 suggesting or offering or or you know hoping that the science community might find this perspective interesting and see the the benefits that would be the 00:23:53 scientific benefits that would come of this the the research gains that would come of this the possibilities that would come of this and and and get engaged right so it's kind of a 00:24:06 like i'm asking the science community to get engaged in this problem in it and in a particular kind of way and in what some people have called a second to you know whatever the phrase escapes me 00:24:19 in the moment so i forget what the uh what is the title their second second i'm gonna just call it second order science but i think there's a slightly different phrase very interesting i remember reading this 00:24:36 second order yeah yeah second order science

      The seven main thrusts: 1. societal transformation - necessary to avoid catastrophe 2. the specific type of transformation is science-based transformation based on entirely new systems - de novo 3. A practical way to implement the transformation in the real world - it must be economical, and doable within the short time window for system change before us. Considering a time period of 50 years for total change, with some types of change at a much higher priority than others.Those communities that are the first to participate would make the most rapid improvements. 4. Promoting a worldview of society as a social superorganism, a cognitive organism, and its societal systems as a cognitive architecture. 5. Knowing the intrinsic purpose of a society - each subsystem must be explained in terms of the overall intrinsic purpose. 6. The reason for transformation - Transformation that improves cognition reduces the uncertainty that our society's intrinsic purpose is fulfilled. 7. Forming a partnership between the global science community and the communities of the world.

  6. Jun 2022
    1. The main problem of the Linux community is that it is divided. I know this division represents freedom of choice but when your rivals are successful, you must inspect them carefully. And both rivals here (MacOS and Windows) get their power from the "less is more approach".This division in Linux communities make people turn into their communities when they have problems and never be heard as a big, unified voice.When something goes wrong with other OSes, people start complaining in many forums and support sites, some of them writing to multiple places and others support them by saying "yeah, I have that problem, too".In the Linux world, the answers to such forums come as "don't use that shitty distro" or "use that command and circumvent the problem".Long story short" average Linux user doesn't know that they are:still customers and have all the rights to demand from companiesthey can get together and act up louder.Imagine such an organizing that most of the Linux users manage to get together and writing to Netflix. Maybe not all of them use Netflix but the number of the Linux users are greater than Netflix members. What a domination it would be!But instead we turn into our communities and act like a survival tribe who has to solve all their problems themselves .
    1. multilateral cooperation is key to accelerate such action that new and additional voices need to be heard and engaged with especially 00:10:11 those of youth women indigenous groups and local communities the need to centre action on the principles of reaching out to the furthest first and leaving no one behind something like gandhian talisman

      There is a need to integrate top down, middle and bottom up actors into a grand synthesis to achieve the greatest efficacy in a Marshall plan.

      The community is the building block of society. Community action is still an idling capacity, an untapped resource. There is a natural synergy between communities and youth, and the bridge is schools.

  7. Apr 2022
    1. Dr. Deepti Gurdasani [@dgurdasani1]. (2021, October 30). A very disturbing read on the recent JCVI minutes released. They seem to consider immunity through infection in children advantageous, discussing children as live “booster” vaccines for adults. I would expect this from anti-vaxx groups, not a scientific committee. [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/dgurdasani1/status/1454383106555842563

    1. ReconfigBehSci [@SciBeh]. (2021, November 14). Kai Spiekermann will speak the need for science communication and how it supports the pivotal role of knowledge in a functioning democracy. The panel will focus on what collective intelligence has to offer. 3/6 [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1459813528987217926

    1. increased mobility and urbanization of modern life, which further shakes up societies, including existing family structures and gender roles

      Another possible structural cause of weakened democracy, though I'm not sure how urbanization leads to a decrease in communal glue.

    1. Allyson Pollock [@AllysonPollock]. (2022, January 4). The health care crisis is of governments making over three decades. Closing half general and acute beds, closing acute hospitals and community services,eviscerating public health, no service planning. Plus unevidenced policies on testing and self isolation of contacts. @dthroat [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/AllysonPollock/status/1478326352516460544

    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2020, November 10). Starting soon Day 2 SchBeh Workshop ‘Building an online information environment for policy relevant science’ join for a Q&A with Martha Scherzer (WHO) on role of behavioural scientists in a crisis followed by sessions on ‘Online Discourse’ and ‘Tools’ https://t.co/Gsr66BRGcJ [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1326121764657770496

    1. Natalie E. Dean, PhD. (2021, May 4). Another framing for this tweet: Wow, the US will soon be able to expand vaccine access to 12-15 year olds. Meanwhile, there are countries where healthcare workers treating COVID patients can’t access vaccines. What more can the US government do to support the global community? [Tweet]. @nataliexdean. https://twitter.com/nataliexdean/status/1389568668548349952

    1. Julia Raifman. (2021, July 25). Policymakers are pointing fingers at “the unvaccinated” What if they gave them a hand instead? - Bring vax & food to workplaces, schools, homes -Fund local doctors, including pediatricians, to call patients & deliver vax—Learn from success of Indian Health Service approach [Tweet]. @JuliaRaifman. https://twitter.com/JuliaRaifman/status/1419288641885593604

    1. Brianna Wu. (2021, June 5). MRNA is unbelievably fragile. The enzymes that degrade it are literally everywhere. That’s why they had to develop specialized lipid nanoparticles to deliver it. It would last two seconds in a sewer system. Also, it gets separated from the delivery system after it’s injected. Https://t.co/35dZ6r6UAq [Tweet]. @BriannaWu. https://twitter.com/BriannaWu/status/1400998163968933888

  8. Mar 2022
    1. virtuellen realität

      Ggf. ist hier ein Anschlusspunkt für einen älteren Gedanken von Howard Rheingold? Ich muss mir Rheingolds Begriff der virtual community erst noch ansehen. Hier findet man das Buch.

    1. “It’s really hard to help Emmett understand anything qualitative,” one former employee says. “It has to be quantitative.”

      Does running a community require qualitative decision making?

  9. Feb 2022
    1. When I hear people in a variety of contexts talking about “building community” for students or colleagues (or, customers), I worry about that, too.  Is the motivation an additive one?  “Let’s give them more people to connect with and rely on?”  Or is it intended to be a kind of capture?

      What an enormous challenge for those of us in faculty development and other "community-building" businesses. Are we actually serving when we help people acculturate? We might be. We also might be trying to capture peoples' time and attention and loyalty.

    1. “When I moved to Kansas,” Roberts said, “I was like, ‘holy shit, they’re giving stuff away.’”

      This sounds great, but what are the "costs" on the other side? How does one balance out the economics of this sort of housing situation versus amenities supplied by a community in terms of culture, health, health care, interaction, etc.? Is there a maximum on a curve to be found here? Certainly in some places one is going to overpay for this basket of goods (perhaps San Francisco?) where in others one may underpay. Does it have anything to do with the lifecycle of cities and their governments? If so, how much?

  10. Jan 2022
    1. What if we designed faculty learning experiences that took less time, were more consistent, and were packed with meaning that compelled us to share and connect with our colleagues and students? What would that look like? I’d think I’d like to explore that question with all of you in 2022.

      Fascinating challenge... how do we design education to maximize "viral" reach?

  11. Dec 2021
    1. Web3 is best under­stood as a game, or a game of games. I don’t intend that as a dig: it’s a really good game! Vast and open-ended, deeply social, with lots of scores to tally … AND you can win real money?? I mean, that’s terrific.
    2. This message was emailed to the Media Lab committee. The assumed audience is subscribers who know roughly what Web3 is supposed to be, but aren’t sure what to think about it. (Here’s more about assumed audiences.)
    1. NFTs appeal to people interested in art, music, sports and culture
    2. People own bitcoin because of the story (digital gold that anyone can use and no one controls) and the scarcity (21M will be created by 2140 and the protocol verifies and enforces that scarcity).A story and scarcity has created a cryptocurrency that today has a market cap of $1.1T, which is greater than the currency of all but 13 countries in the worldTens of millions of people globally now own bitcoin and believe it has massive value despite countless claims that it’s worthless from conventional wisdom in the media and on Wall Street. The success of bitcoin is a testament to the authenticity of the creation (it was the first protocol to achieve trust-minimized digital scarcity) and the conviction of the community. The community did not care what the institutional narrative was, it just believed the story. More and more people have come to believe the story over time, which validates the belief of the early supporters and increases the value.
    3. We’re now seeing new stories attract new people to the cryptocurrency space who don’t care much about money and finance. It turns out there are more people in the world who primarily care about art, music, sports and culture. And stories about art, music, sports and culture tend to be more fun and relatable
    1. lit­tle plac­ards up top mak­ing it clear they are aimed at dif­fer­ent groups of read­ers. Those groups might overlap! They might also: not.
    2. the way they push back against the “context collapse” of the internet, in which every pub­lic post is, by default, addressed to everyone.
    1. “The magic lies in their ability to take word-of-mouth marketing and turn the launches of their products into sort of micro-experiential events,”
    2. “I would call it a brand that’s heavily integrated with art and culture that tends to drive demand through consumer desire and consumer passion as opposed to explicit marketing.”
    3. brand’s products are “emblematic of rebellious youth culture,”
    4. in-the-know
    5. marketing-shy skateboard shop with a cult following fits
    6. symbolize the ultimate in underground cool.
    7. throngs of fans and “hypebeasts” (the term for the streetwear-obsessed)
    8. streetwear aficionados
    1. Une communauté d’apprentissage numérique dans son collège Animation : René Bélanger et Suzanne Mercier (Cégep de Matane) La mise en place d’une communauté d’apprentissage numérique dans son collège amène la mobilisation d’un groupe d’enseignants à innover dans sa pratique ce qui insuffle un vent de changement pour tout le collège. Partage d’expertise, validation de pratique, formation, réflexion sur les enjeux du numérique…
    1. In this study, we drew on sociocultural notions of agency – where individual actions are entwined with community goals. A community is comprised of people with shared and individual goals, in their environments, in the midst of a historical context (Wenger 1998Wenger, E. 1998. Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning, and Identity. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. [Crossref], [Google Scholar]). Due to this web of relationships with people, environment, and history, people do not act autonomously, but according to possibilities within the community. Such possibilities for agency are negotiated over time; actions that strengthen ties to the community constitute investments in the self that in turn, have outcomes for the community as well (Peirce 1995Peirce, B. N. 1995. “Social Identity, Investment, and Language Learning.” TESOL Quarterly 29: 9–31. doi:10.2307/3587803. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]). The financial metaphor in using the word investment is critical – it connotes spent effort that yields dividends. These dividends emerge immediately and over time.

      This helps me consider communities of practice, and unpacking the relational aspects - agency within a context, not autonomous, informed by the context and others. Is there a tension with "groupthink", how to value the diversity in a group, and build stronger not weaker, not defaulting or regressing to a mean?. How do we build a group to be more than the sum of the parts. how does the community work to enhance practice.

  12. Nov 2021
    1. collaboration within a community of people: diverse perspectives, active engagement

      Similar ideas here: Stephen Downes (2015). Design Elements in a Personal Learning Environment. Invited talk, Guadalajara, Mexico. https://www.slideshare.net/Downes/design-elements-in-a-personal-learning-environment-52303224

      What makes an 'online course' different to an 'online learning community'?

    2. people reading the same book at the same time, exploring the same ideas…Norms around signalling you're interested in something, and the extent of your interest, would go far

      How do we find the connections we don't know we're looking for?

    1. However, I would say that the distributive and regenerative society that Raworth proposes would depend a lot on resilient and self-reliant local communities and local government acting as a ‘partner’ as is nowadays talked about a lot.These communities and government would need to figure out together how to let amongst others local agriculture, manufacturing and managing the Commons flourish. The book instead pretty much leaves out local communities in which the households are embedded and government focus is almost completely on nation states.

      Communities could be the key to a successful transition, as they are small enough to be agile in decision making, if done optimally, and large enough to be impactful.

    1. The recipe for starting a new media venture in 2021 seems to be straightforward: blog, newsletter, podcast. From there you scale up and start adding additional verticals, like events (both virtual and in-person as more people get vaccinated), discussion forums (like a Discord server for paying subscribers), a YouTube channel and so on.

      Not only new media; this would probably also work for schools, or any learning community.

    1. Tania Bubela. (2021, November 17). New resources on #COVID19vaccines & #pregnancy from the fantastic group @CDCofBC Indigenous Knowledge Translation Working Group. @HarlanPruden working to meet knowledge needs of Indigenous communities in ways that are meaningful. @ScienceUpFirst take note! @SFU_FHS @CaulfieldTim https://t.co/oK3WJUj9p6 [Tweet]. @bubela_tania. https://twitter.com/bubela_tania/status/1460776956379557889

    1. I don’t see something else naturally taking its place either.

      I like the idea of Discord as a backchannel but it suffers from the problem that it's a relatively niche app, and no-one is going to install and learn how to use it just for a conference.

      I think that Discord would work well for a learning community though.

    1. role of school as a community

      According to teachers, distance learning should be based on a school's strategy where everyone is equally committed and responsible for students

      1. how to structure to resolve equality
      2. equality after overcoming disparities
      3. securing equality will remain a permanent concern
    1. For low-carbon practices to grow and displace high-carbon ones, integrated action across disparate spaces and coordination between many different actors are necessary (161). For example, mobility scholars (166) highlight the extent of reconfiguration required to disassociate academia from high-carbon travel, including altered institutional cultures, funding practices, and student recruitment to support virtual ways of working. Although novel low-carbon practices may emerge, policy must ensure these stabilize and become prevalent, as well as impeding the circulation of high-carbon practices.

      A new social imaginary of cosmolocality, where we spend most of our time locally, but use information technology as the prime method for nonlocal communication. In other words, replacing transportation with lower footprint communications.

      https://wiki.p2pfoundation.net/Cosmo-Localism https://wiki.p2pfoundation.net/Cosmo-Localization https://medium.com/@joseramos_30450/the-cosmo-local-reader-invitation-to-participate-dbcb6248f54b

      In the field of production and provisioning systems, cosmolocal production implies designing and sharing designs globally, and downloading the appropriate ones for local clean production, thereby minimizing global supply chains.

      Graduated relocalization that begins to replace auto transportation with pedestrian and bike traffic can result in huge decarbonization impacts. This relocalization movement is also an economic reconfiguration, echoing what community economist Michael Shuman refers to as the movement from Wall Street to Main Street - decentralizing centralizing organizations when feasible, and creating more community wealth while decarbonizing unnecessarily long supply chains.

      https://michaelhshuman.com/store/

  13. Oct 2021
    1. Singanayagam, A., Hakki, S., Dunning, J., Madon, K. J., Crone, M. A., Koycheva, A., Derqui-Fernandez, N., Barnett, J. L., Whitfield, M. G., Varro, R., Charlett, A., Kundu, R., Fenn, J., Cutajar, J., Quinn, V., Conibear, E., Barclay, W., Freemont, P. S., Taylor, G. P., … Lackenby, A. (2021). Community transmission and viral load kinetics of the SARS-CoV-2 delta (B.1.617.2) variant in vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals in the UK: A prospective, longitudinal, cohort study. The Lancet Infectious Diseases, 0(0). https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(21)00648-4

    1. iA Writer + Ghost

      This is the integration that I am using to connect my daily writing practice with the process of publishing. iA Writer and Ghost have enabled me to share my ideas and project intentions into the world in such a way that they have become indispensable tools for community building.

    1. Letting your member co-design with you on community products will strenghten this 3 level of relationships between your members : meet & connect level making things together level tell a story level

      .community design

    1. This is the real value of this approach: transforming an audience that by definition is passive or that has a minimum degree of interaction, into a group of active people who dynamically collaborate in the construction of a solution, of a benefit, of an asset.

      .community design

    2. The differences with a traditional service are precisely the metrics which, in addition to being quantitative, must be qualitative and must measure all three areas listed above: the system of identity, the engagement and the co-management of the community.

      .community design

    3. community design analyses and designs the interactions of the individual with the proposing organization, but also those of the individual as a member of a group, where he interacts with his peers and with the organization itself, and where he takes on an active role both in the design of the solution (co-planning) and in the organization (co-management).

      .community design

    4. Community design, unlike user-centred design, no longer focuses on the needs of people as individuals, but as members of a group (community), who recognize themselves around a value proposition.

      .community design

    5. designing a community certainly includes a part of immersion in the community itself, but first of all it includes the design of the context within which the members gather, move and grow.

      .community design

  14. theliturgists.com theliturgists.com
    1. THE SUNDAY THING

      The Sunday Thing

      The love of money is the root of all evil

      This week, Michael Gungor asked us to discuss money in our breakout groups.

      Money is power

      We outsource our power and authority to those who claim to have greater access to capital, because we underestimate and undervalue our own social influence, economic capacity, and political agency. The entreprecariat is designed for learned helplessness (social: individualism), trained incapacities (economic: specialization), and bureaucratic intransigence (political: authoritarianism). https://hypothes.is/a/667dOC0bEeyV6Itx3ySxmw

      Indigenous cultures in Canada were disempowered by outlawing the cultural practice of generosity (potlatch) and replacing the practice with centralized power over the medium of exchange: money. Money is a mechanism of disempowerment.

      Money is a shared story we tell ourselves about what has value. https://www.npr.org/transcripts/795246685

      We translated “ekklesia” as church. It is the deliberative body of the experiment in democracy in Athens, Greece. The people who are figuring out how to live together in the commons. The work of the people. The Liturgists.


      The Story of Money

      In this hour, On the Media looks at the story of money, from its uncertain origins to its digital reinvention in the form of cryptocurrency.

      On the Media: Full Faith & Credit


      Squid Game

      People were also discussing Squid Game.

      Squid Game was on my mind today before the call. “The reality of the history of Canada’s mining industry makes #SquidGame look like child’s play.” https://twitter.com/bauhouse/status/1449726452098682881?s=20

      The truth is that all of the gold that was mined out of the Klondike was under Indigenous land. There was no treaty with any of Indigenous peoples in the Yukon.

      Commons: Mining