284 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Jan 2023
    1. The posture of democratic citizenship is avowal of rights and obligations of membership in a civic community. The rationale for this is the moral and political goodness of a civic way of living and the shared promise of human self-realization through interdependence. As such it is the exemplary, most inclusive form of membership; it is a precondition for the sustainability in the modern secular era of other expressions of membership in our lives—social, economic, kinship, familial, and intimate.[17] Again, citizenship avows—makes a vow, takes on a trust—on behalf of a future of moral and political potential toward which it is reasonable to strive. Citizenship is iterative and ongoing; it provides continuity and provokes innovation; each generation of democratic citizens begins a new story of the demos and continues an ongoing one.[18]

      !- key finding : citizenship is a trusteeship - in which the individual takes on responsibility to participate in upholding the mutually agreed principles and promises leading to collective human self-realization - the individual works with others to collective realize this dream which affects all individuals within the group

      !- implement : TPF / DH / SRG -implement this education program globally as part of Stop Reset Go / Deep Humanity training that recognizes the individual collective entanglement and include in the Tipping Point Festival as well

    1. CollectionCho Chikun Encyclopedia of Life and Death - Elementary (350-499)Difficulty12 Kyu

      bent four is alive unless it bends at 1-1

  3. Dec 2022
    1. Goroutines run in the same address space, so access to shared memory must be synchronized.

      翻译:Goroutins 运行在相同的地址空间,所以访问共享内容必须是【协调的】?? synchronized, 翻译为“协调的”更为适合啊。

    2. You can only declare a method with a receiver whose type is defined in the same package as the method. You cannot declare a method with a receiver whose type is defined in another package (which includes the built-in types such as int).

      You can only declare a method with a receiver whose type is defined in the same package as the method.

    3. A method is a function with a special receiver argument.

      A method is a function with a special receiver argument.

    1. Time was good to the Go-Betweens: it vindicated them. They were not a popular group, but they were very much loved, and that was far more important. The gospel had spread. There were substantial inducements for the two songwriters to work together again – not least their faltering solo careers – and after they toured as a duo to promote a best-of release, there was a sense of inevitability that a second act was imminent, especially when both songwriters returned to live in Brisbane.

      Although 'time may have been good to them' in regards to their legacy and reputation, Robert Forster explains in his autobiography that they were still paying off the touring advance associated with 16 Lovers Lane for 25 years.

    2. HERE'S THE FIRST thing you should know about Grant McLennan: he wasn't a genius. Neither is his friend and songwriting partner Robert Forster, with whom he formed the Go-Betweens in late 1977. Rather, both were artisans of the first order: talented songwriters who worked diligently at their craft and believed completely in the value of what they were doing. Their aesthetics were finely tuned and they understood – first intuitively, then by experience – what it took to make great records.

      Maybe 'genius' is in the ability to keep going.

    1. type switches

      type switch 是一种固定的格式吗?还是基于 switch 条件控制的?

      A type switch is a construct ``` func do(i interface{}) { switch v := i.(type): case int:

      case string:

      default:

      } ```

    2. Type switches

      type switch 是一种固定的格式吗?还是基于 switch 条件控制的? A type switch is a construct ``` func do(i interface{}) { switch v := i.(type): case int:

      case string:

      default:

      } ```

    1. An interface type is defined as a set of method signatures.

      A method is a function with a special receiver argument.

      ``` // interface type Abser intreface { Abs() float64 } // method type Vertex struct { X, Y float }

      func (v Vertex) Abs() float64 { return math.Sqrt(v.X * v.X + v.Y * v.Y) }

      ```

    2. An interface type is defined as a set of method signatures.

      An interface type is defined as a set of method signatures.

      A method is a function with a special receiver argument.

      ``` // interface type Abser intreface { Abs() float64 } // method type Vertex struct { X, Y float }

      func (v Vertex) Abs() float64 { return math.Sqrt(v.X * v.X + v.Y * v.Y) }

      ```

    1. For example, this FindDigits function loads a file into memory and searches it for the first group of consecutive numeric digits, returning them as a new slice. ``` var digitRegexp = regexp.MustCompile("[0-9]+")

      func FindDigits(filename string) []byte { b, _ := ioutil.ReadFile(filename) return digitRegexp.Find(b) } This code behaves as advertised, but the returned []byte points into an array containing the entire file. Since the slice references the original array, as long as the slice is kept around the garbage collector can’t release the array; the few useful bytes of the file keep the entire contents in memory. To fix this problem one can copy the interesting data to a new slice before returning it: func CopyDigits(filename string) []byte { b, _ := ioutil.ReadFile(filename) b = digitRegexp.Find(b) c := make([]byte, len(b)) copy(c, b) return c } ```

    2. slice = slice[0:n]

      // 只取 m+n 位长度的slice,而不是返回整个扩展后的 newSlice

    1. The length of a slice is the number of elements it contains. ↳ The capacity of a slice is the number of elements in the underlying array, counting from the first element in the slice. ↳ The length and capacity of a slice s can be obtained using the expressions len(s) and cap(s).

      len(slice []type) cap(slice []type)

    1. The deferred call's arguments are evaluated immediately, but the function call is not executed until the surrounding function returns.

      延迟调用的参数会立即求值,但直到周围函数返回时才会执行函数调用。

      ``` func main() { defer fmt.Println(time.Now()) time.Sleep(time.Second * 2) fmt.Println(time.Now()) }

      ```

    1. Compose V2 has been re-written in Go, which improves integration with other Docker command-line features, and allows it to run natively on macOS on Apple silicon, Windows, and Linux, without dependencies such as Python.
    1. For now, because you haven't published the module yet, you need to adapt the example.com/hello module so it can find the example.com/greetings code on your local file system.


      现在来说,因为尚没发布模块(example.com/greeting),你须要调整 example.com/hello模块,使得它(example.com/hello)可以在本地文件系统中找到 example.com/greetings 代码。


      步骤: To do that, use the go mod edit command to edit the example.com/hello module to redirect Go tools from its module path (where the module isn't) to the local directory (where it is).

      From the command prompt in the hello directory, run the following command:

      $ go mod edit -replace example.com/greetings=../greetings


      The command specifies that example.com/greetings should be replaced with ../greetings for the purpose of locating the dependency. After you run the command, the go.mod file in the hello directory should include a replace directive:

    2. For now, because you haven't published the module yet, you need to adapt the example.com/hello module so it can find the example.com/greetings code on your local file system.
  4. Nov 2022
    1. This year my intention was to have fun, to not plan anything in advance and to just see what would emerge organically.

      I believe you were able to do that precisely because you were prepared. The more you prepare, the more beneficial letting go of the plan is .

    1. go commands

      go run, compile and running a program when you are frequent changes, it doesn't generate a binary executable.

      go build, compiles the packages, along with their depencies, but it doesn't install the result.

      go install, compiles and installs the packages.

    1. Second, the range of the function must be efficiently computable, and it must be efficiently computable by you.

      taking too long to compute if a user is a good fit is the same as not being able to.

    1. 变量所绑定的内存区域是要有一个明确的边界的

      对内存操作是一个敏感的东西,不能操作不该操作的区域。比如一些外挂,都是基于对内存的一些修改。比如CE工具等

    1. 导入路径是用户用来导入软件包的字符串。它指定软件包源代码所在的目录(相对于 $GOROOT/src/pkg 或 $GOPATH/src)。 导入路径应该是全局唯一的,因此请使用源存储库的路径作为基础。例如,来自 go.net 子存储库的 websocket 软件包的导入路径为 “ golang.org/x/net/websocket”。 Go 项目拥有路径 “ github.com/golang”,因此该路径不能被其他作者用于其他软件包。由于存储库 URL 和导入路径是相同的,因此 go get 命令可以自动获取并安装软件包。 如果您不使用托管源存储库,请选择一些唯一的前缀,例如域,公司或项目名称。例如,所有 Google 内部 Go 代码的导入路径均以字符串 “ google” 开头。 导入路径的最后一个元素通常与包名称相同。例如,导入路径 "net/http" 包含程序包 http。这不是必需的 - 您可以根据需要使它们有所不同 - 但出于可预测性的考虑,应遵循约定:用户可能会惊讶 import"foo / bar'' 将标识符 quux 引入包名称空间。 有时人们将 GOPATH 设置为源存储库的根目录,并将其程序包放在相对于存储库根目录的目录中,例如 “"src / my / package"。一方面,这使导入路径保持较短(“"my / package" 而不是 " github.com/me/project/my/package"),但另一方面,它破坏了 go get 并迫使用户重新设置他们的 GOPATH 以使用该软件包。不要这样。
    1. A command determines whether it is in a workspace context by first examining the GOWORK environment variable. If GOWORK is set to off, the command will be in a single-module context. If it is empty or not provided, the command will search the current working directory, and then successive parent directories, for a file go.work. If a file is found, the command will operate in the workspace it defines; otherwise, the workspace will include only the module containing the working directory. If GOWORK names a path to an existing file that ends in .work, workspace mode will be enabled. Any other value is an error. You can use the go env GOWORK command to determine which go.work file the go command is using. go env GOWORK will be empty if the go command is not in workspace mode.

      Go workspace mode

    2. A workspace is a collection of modules on disk that are used as the main modules when running minimal version selection (MVS).

      A workspace is a collection of modules on disk that are used as the main modules when running minimal version selection (MVS).

  5. Sep 2022
    1. Supervisord

      sonic 用的就是 supervisord 来管理进程 go daemon 是否可以用 docker 和 docker-compose 来管理

    1. For example, whereas C programmers have argued for years about where to put their brackets, and whether code should be indented with tabs or spaces, both Rust and Go eliminate such issues completely by using a standard formatting tool (gofmt for Go, rustfmt for Rust) which rewrites your code automatically using the canonical style. It’s not that this particular style is so wonderful in itself: it’s the standardisation which Rust and Go programmers appreciate.
  6. Aug 2022
    1. 编译器在执行完语法分析之后会输出一个抽象语法树,这个抽象语法树会辅助编译器进行语义分析

      所有编译器理论原理基本一致

  7. Jul 2022
    1. Pointer receivers You can declare methods with pointer receivers. This means the receiver type has the literal syntax *T for some type T. (Also, T cannot itself be a pointer such as *int.) For example, the Scale method here is defined on *Vertex. Methods with pointer receivers can modify the value to which the receiver points (as Scale does here). Since methods often need to modify their receiver, pointer receivers are more common than value receivers. Try removing the * from the declaration of the Scale function on line 16 and observe how the program's behavior changes. With a value receiver, the Scale method operates on a copy of the original Vertex value. (This is the same behavior as for any other function argument.) The Scale method must have a pointer receiver to change the Vertex value declared in the main function.
    1. we term these individually constructed networks by the aggregate namepersonware. Serving as a medium between the individual and the social world, personware provides aself-reinforced and self-cohered narrative of the individual and its relationships with society. It is boththe sense-maker and the sense being made of social reality entangled into an interactive autopoieticconstruct. It maintains a personal line of continuity that interfaces with the broader societal threads bymeans of concrete intentional cognitive selections. These cognitive selections determine how individualminds represent (encode) the state of affairs of the world in language, how they communicate theserepresentations and how they further decode received communications into an understanding of thestate of affairs of the world that eventually trigger actions in the world and further cognitive selections.At moments of decision, that is, attempting to make a choice to affect the world, the human is thusmore often than not symbolically pre-situated. He enacts a personal narrative of which he is hardlythe author and to which almost every decision is knitted in.

      !- definition : personware * individually constructed network of relationships and social systems that * provides self-reinforced, self-cohered narrative of the individual and its relationship with society * Metaphorically conceive of personware as a suit we don based on years and decades of social conditioning "Personware" is a good word to use in SRG / DH framework that views the individual human organism's life journey as a deeply entangled individual AND collective journey or entangled individual/civilzational journey * From SRG/DH perspective the individual human organism is always on an entangled dual journey - from birth to death within a biological body and as part of a much longer civilizational journey since the beginning of modern humans (or even further back) * Individuals make intentional cognitive selections * Individual minds encode state of affair of the world via a combination of cognitive experience and language * Individual minds share their understanding of the world through outgoing language communication * Individual minds decode incoming information and store

    2. Consequently, theshape of the gridlock [9], in which further progression towards an ever-greater executive capacity givento a selected group of institutions has become nearly impossible, is not an anomaly to be overcome.The gridlock is the only configuration in which the global system could have settled. It isthe configuration any system is bound to adopt when it is composed of a multitude of differentlypositioned, differently oriented, heterogeneous decision-makers, operating in different dimensionsand scales, none of which universally dominant and all are co-dependent and constrained by others.

      !- question : governance gridlock of disparate actors

    3. The Human Takeover: A Call for a Venture into anExistential Opportunity
      • Title: The Human Takeover: A Call for a Venture into an Existential Opportunity
      • Author: Marta Lenartowicz, David R. Weinbaum, Francis Heylighen, Kate Kingsbury and Tjorven Harmsen
      • Date: 5 April, 2018
  8. bafybeihfoajtasczfz4s6u6j4mmyzlbn7zt4f7hpynjdvd6vpp32zmx5la.ipfs.dweb.link bafybeihfoajtasczfz4s6u6j4mmyzlbn7zt4f7hpynjdvd6vpp32zmx5la.ipfs.dweb.link
  9. bafybeicyqgzvzf7g3zprvxebvbh6b4zpti5i2m2flbh4eavtpugiffo5re.ipfs.dweb.link bafybeicyqgzvzf7g3zprvxebvbh6b4zpti5i2m2flbh4eavtpugiffo5re.ipfs.dweb.link
    1. The Life We Live and the Life We Experience: Introducing theEpistemological Difference between “Lifeworld” (Lebenswelt) and “LifeConditions” (Lebenslage)
      • Title:The Life We Live and the Life We Experience: Introducing the Epistemological Difference between “Lifeworld” (Lebenswelt) and “Life Conditions” (Lebenslage)
      • Author: Bjorn Kraus
      • Date: 2015
      • Source: https://d-nb.info/1080338144/34
      • Annotation status: incomplete
    1. Is our planet doubly alive? Gaia, globalization, and the Anthropocene’s planetary superorganisms

      Title: Is our planet doubly alive? Gaia, globalization, and the Anthropocene’s planetary superorganisms Author: Shoshitaishvili, Boris Date: 25 April, 2022

    1. Menu Workshops Mortality Awareness Preparedness Project About Us Mission History People Contact About Becker Biography Becker’s Synthesis Books Related Works Becker Fans Resources Terror Management Theory Webinars Educator Resources Book & Film Reviews Interviews Lecture Texts Audio Recordings Video Resources This Mortal Life Becker in the World Death Acceptance Religion and Death Anxiety Art and Artists Climate Talk Discrimination and Racial Justice See All Blog Store The Denial of Death and the Practice of Dying
      • Title:THE DENIAL OF DEATH AND THE PRACTICE OF DYING
      • Author: Huges, Glenn
      • Date:?
    1. randomFormat starts with a lowercase letter, making it accessible only to code in its own package (in other words, it's not exported).

      function name starts with a lowercase

    1. Any Go function can return multiple values. For more, see Effective Go.

      function can return multiple values.

      func Hello(name string) (string, error) { return name, nil }

    1. so this is white light passing through a dispersive prison and this is a visible spectrum from about 420 nanometers in the violet through 500 nanometers and 00:00:18 the green 580 yellow 610 and orange and 650 red and some of the slides that have this along the bottom axis so how dependent I'll be in color what do you 00:00:30 think we depend on color a lot a little lots okay
      • Title: How do we see colours?
      • Author: Andrew Stockman
      • Date: 2016

      Many different color illusions Good to mine for BEing Journeys

    1. use the go mod edit command to edit the example.com/hello module to redirect Go tools from its module path (where the module isn't) to the local directory (where it is).

      step #1:

      go mod edit -replace */=/

      step #2:

      go mod tidy

    2. go mod edit -replace example.com/greetings=../greetings

      模块(module)路径修改 如何修改模块的路径,将线上的路径指向本地。

    1. I want to start with a game. Okay? And to win this game, all you have to do is see the reality that's in front of you as it really is, all right? So we have two panels here, of colored dots. And one of those dots is the same in the two panels. And you have to tell me which one. Now, I narrowed it down to the gray one, the green one, and, say, the orange one. 00:00:41 So by a show of hands, we'll start with the easiest one. Show of hands: how many people think it's the gray one? Really? Okay. How many people think it's the green one? And how many people think it's the orange one? Pretty even split. Let's find out what the reality is. Here is the orange one. (Laughter) Here is the green one. And here is the gray one. 00:01:16 (Laughter) So for all of you who saw that, you're complete realists. All right? (Laughter) So this is pretty amazing, isn't it? Because nearly every living system has evolved the ability to detect light in one way or another. So for us, seeing color is one of the simplest things the brain does. And yet, even at this most fundamental level, 00:01:40 context is everything. What I'm going to talk about is not that context is everything, but why context is everything. Because it's answering that question that tells us not only why we see what we do, but who we are as individuals, and who we are as a society.
      • Title: Optical illusions show how we see
      • Author: Beau Lotto
      • Date: 8 Oct, 2009

      The opening title is very pith:

      No one is an outside observer of nature, each of us is defined by our ecology.

      We need to unpack the full depth of this sentence.

      Seeing is believing. This is more true than we think.Our eyes trick us into seeing the same color as different ones depending on the context. Think about the philosophical implications of this simple finding. What does this tell us about "objective reality"? Colors that we would compare as different in one circumstance are the same in another.

      Evolution helps us do this for survival.

    1. so here's a straightforward question what color are the strawberries in this photograph the red right wrong those strawberries are gray if you don't 00:00:12 believe me we look for one of the reddest looking patches on this image cut it out now what color is that it's great right but when you put it back on 00:00:25 the image it's red again it's weird right this illusion was created by a Japanese researcher named Akiyoshi Kitaoka and it hinges on something called color constancy it's an incredible visual 00:00:39 phenomenon by which the color of an object appears to stay more or less the same regardless of the lighting conditions under which you see it or the lighting conditions under which your brain thinks you're seeing it

      Title: Why your brain thinks these strawberries are red Author: WIRED Date:2022

      Color Constancy

      Use this for BEing journey

  10. bafybeibbaxootewsjtggkv7vpuu5yluatzsk6l7x5yzmko6rivxzh6qna4.ipfs.dweb.link bafybeibbaxootewsjtggkv7vpuu5yluatzsk6l7x5yzmko6rivxzh6qna4.ipfs.dweb.link
    1. func Hello(name string) string { // Return a greeting that embeds the name in a message. message := fmt.Sprintf("Hi, %v. Welcome!", name) return message }

      func Hello(name string) string {} Hello - Function name string - Parameter type string - Return type

    2. the := operator is a shortcut for declaring and initializing a variable in one line (Go uses the value on the right to determine the variable's type). Taking the long way, you might have written this as: var message string message = fmt.Sprintf("Hi, %v. Welcome!", name)

      declare and initialize a vairable in one line. 声明和初始化一个变量

    3. Declare a greetings package to collect related functions.

      Declare a package to collect related functions.

    1. 1)声明在函数内部,是函数的本地值,类似private 2)声明在函数外部,是对当前包可见(包内所有.go文件都可见)的全局值,类似protect 3)声明在函数外部且首字母大写是所有包可见的全局值,类似public

      (1)声明在函数内部; (2)声明在函数外部; (3)声明在函数外部,且首字母大写;

    1. cognitive illusion and immediate experience perspectives 00:01:44 from buddhist philosophy

      Title: cognitive illusion and immediate experience perspectives from buddhist philosophy Author: Jay L. Garfield Year: 2022

      This is a very important talk outlining a number of key concepts that Stop Reset Go and Deep Humanity are built upon and also a rich source of BEing Journeys.

      In brief, this talk outlines key humanistic (discoverable by a modern human being regardless of any cultural, gender, class, etc difference) concepts of Buddhist philosophy that SRG / DH embeds into its framework to make more widely accessible..

      The title of the talk refers to the illusions that our own cognition produces of both outer and inner appearances because the mechanisms that produce them area opaque to us. Their immediacy feels as if they are real.

      If what we sense and think is real is an illusion, then what is real? "Real" in this case implies ultimate truth. As we will see, Nagarjuna's denial of any argument that claims to be the ulitmate is denied. What is left after such a complete denial? Still something persists.

    1. you are probably somewhat unfamiliar with the term biosemiotics is not in widespread use um and but it represents a very very 00:00:17 important reference point when we come to theories of embodied cognition the founder of biosemiotics is typically held to be jacob von xcool 00:00:29 biosemiotics is a field within the broader domain of semiotics which considers the manner in which meaning arises through various forms of mediation such as signs indices indexes 00:00:42 symbols and the like

      Title: Introduction to Umwelt theory and Biosemiotics Author

    1. so that's me trying to do a synoptic integration of all of the four e-cognitive science and trying to get it 00:00:12 into a form that i think would help make make sense to people of the of cognition and also in a form that's helpful to get them to see what's what we're talking about when i'm talking about the meaning 00:00:25 that's at stake in the meaning crisis because it's not sort of just semantic meaning

      John explains how the 4 P's originated as a way to summarize and present in a palatable way of presenting the cognitive science “4E” approach to cognition - that cognition does not occur solely in the head, but is also embodied, embedded, enacted, or extended by way of extra-cranial processes and structures.

    1. Dogen and Nagarjuna’s Tetralemma #6 of 21
    2. The absolute in the relative and the relative in the absolute

      Title: The absolute in the relative and the relative in the absolute Author: Judith Ragir Date: ?

    3. These are the four positions on the diamond shape; the opposites, both and neither.  We swing around and around the diamond shape if we stay in language and our thinking. This is the swirling world of thinking and samsara. To enter the truth, we have to get off the diamond shape and enter into the center of the chart. The center of the chart is, as Katagiri Roshi always said, the intersection of time and space. It is the truth-happening place, the only true reality – the present moment. When we find our heads spinning around all the prism of viewpoints, we can simply enter into the intersection of time and space and let “understanding” go.

      This is a very pith statement. We go round and round in our thinking, jumping from one position to another but not able to see that our sense of frustration does not arise from not finding the right view, but rather from chasing after any view. ANY view will have the same inherent flaw. We are like a dog chasing its own tail, or like the ouroboro serpent attempting to eat its own tail.

      It is the awareness of the meta-condition that is the key insight. Ultimately, it is up to us to finally convince ourselves to let go of chasing "understanding" to fall into the lived experience of the truth, rather than the propositional only....which is like empty calories and can never salsify our deepest aspirations of wisdom.

    1. i really think this last one the coordination systems how do you get large groups of people to organize much better 00:16:44 that holds some of the most promise

      Indyweb / SRG / Global Boundaries combination for the large scale transformation and coordination framework.

    1. Understanding our situatedness, blowing up assumptionsWhat are the things your brain has been conditioned to believe as “true”? What should you re-examine, pull apart and re-assemble with intention?

      Title: Understanding our situatedness, blowing up assumptions What are the things your brain has been conditioned to believe as “true”? What should you re-examine, pull apart and re-assemble with intention? Author: Laird, Katie

    1. i framed this this r d program that is it's conceptual at the 00:07:18 time it's not funded yet you know i'm hoping that we can secure funds but i frame it as a partnership between this global science community and local communities 00:07:29 so it's very so dialogue with the public and within the science community and among interested stakeholders is extremely important in this um i i i 00:07:42 you know to me science has a role in in such a r d program because science is really the you know the where we would turn to answer some really difficult questions like if you wanted to build a simulation 00:07:56 model of how environmental or environmental or economic uh outcomes might be given you know a b c and d well then you know that's a that's a technical those are technical questions 00:08:08 um if you're if you're asking how can we measure how can what kind of metrics are reasonable for environmental and social well-being 00:08:23 those are largely scientific questions you know the math can be complicated for example but the questions of you know how do what do we want what do people want 00:08:36 how how how do they want their light you know how do they want to live their lives in in society those are questions for you know for the public and for communities especially 00:08:49 um i i the the intention of the r d program is not to develop one size fits all solution you know to trial it in a local community and then spread it everywhere that's not at all 00:09:02 the idea the idea is that this is an ongoing learning process a true partnership between uh local communities and the science and the science community and there would be just a million sorts 00:09:15 of you know experiments that one might might might run uh to to improve the kinds of societal systems that we have 00:09:27 or that were you know that we're proposing uh develop a new system try it out see how it works gather data you know do another experiment uh all within the partnership of at with 00:09:39 local communities at the local community level i think maybe you know i since i know this stuff

      This project is a collaboration between the global scientific community and local communities to improve societal systems. It's not a one-size-fits-all process, but many different experiments.

      Dialogue is a critical component of this process.

      Tipping Point Festival and SRG strategy is well aligned with Science-driven societal transformation ethos: second order science combined with local communities as the building block of civilization AND cosmolocal networking (https://clreader.net) via Indyweb interpersonal computing.

    2. we're coming out of the angle of 00:14:05 model policy or simulations policy but that kind of question about policy setting and then sense making again maybe different groups use kind of different terms but all that sense making and problem 00:14:18 solving has been siloed and the fact that there's not connection and common frameworks to bridge as you're placing it in one integrated brain like societal systems as a cognitive 00:14:31 architecture that's not gonna work if the different sections are not properly having their within and between connections working and we're seeing all these different sectors all these little regions of the brain 00:14:43 health governance political legal justice education scientific analytical economic financial monetary you could go to a new site and on any given day see all of these things changing 00:14:57 so very prescient to think about how the total system is going to be changing and finding new stable states otherwise it's going to be just on a spiral probably not in the right direction right as it seems to be unfortunately 00:15:09 yeah um yes so so so the idea is can we design societal systems like economic and other systems 00:15:22 such that the the set of them the set that is the cognitive architecture for for society can we design them so that they they are serving the same purpose that are they are 00:15:33 they are integrated not separate systems and i think you were you were sort of referring to that a second ago but this the idea here is an integrated set of systems that serve a common purpose 00:15:47 and for which a fitness you know a fitness evaluation a fitness score can be can be made is that something that we're going to return to is like how do we define common purpose

      Rather than tackling problems in individual silos, John is promoting an integrated approach.

      This is wholly consistent with the underpinnings of SRG Deep Humanity praxis that stresses the same need for multi-disciplinary study and synthesis of all the various parts of the SSO.into one unified Gestalt to mitigate progress traps. https://hyp.is/go?url=https%3A%2F%2Fthetyee.ca%2FAnalysis%2F2019%2F09%2F20%2FRonald-Wright-Can-We-Dodge-Progress-Trap%2F&group=world https://hyp.is/go?url=https%3A%2F%2Fthetyee.ca%2FCulture%2F2018%2F10%2F12%2FHumanity-Progress-Trap%2F&group=world

    3. we're going to talk in this series 00:01:10 about a series of papers that i just published in the in the journal sustainability that that series is titled science driven societal transformation

      Title: Science-driven Societal Transformation, Part 1, 2 and 3 John Boik, Oregon State University John's Website: https://principledsocietiesproject.org/

      Intro: A society can be viewed as a superorganism that expresses an intrinsic purpose of achieving and maintaining vitality. The systems of a society can be viewed as a societal cognitive architecture. The goal of the R&D program is to develop new, integrated systems that better facilitate societal cognition (i.e., learning, decision making, and adaptation). Our major unsolved problems, like climate change and biodiversity loss, can be viewed as symptoms of dysfunctional or maladaptive societal cognition. To better solve these problems, and to flourish far into the future, we can implement systems that are designed from the ground up to facilitate healthy societal cognition.

      The proposed R&D project represents a partnership between the global science community, interested local communities, and other interested parties. In concept, new systems are field tested and implemented in local communities via a special kind of civic club. Participation in a club is voluntary, and only a small number of individuals (roughly, 1,000) is needed to start a club. No legislative approval is required in most democratic nations. Clubs are designed to grow in size and replicate to new locations exponentially fast. The R&D project is conceptual and not yet funded. If it moves forward, transformation on a near-global scale could occur within a reasonable length of time. The R&D program spans a 50 year period, and early adopting communities could see benefits relatively fast.

    1. "Ignorance really is blissful, especially for the powerful" Q&A with Linsey McGoey, author of "The Unknowers: How Strategic Ignorance Rules the World".

      Title: "Ignorance really is blissful, especially for the powerful" Q&A with Linsey McGoey, author of "The Unknowers: How Strategic Ignorance Rules the World".

  11. bafybeiapea6l2v2aio6hvjs6vywy6nuhiicvmljt43jtjvu3me2v3ghgmi.ipfs.dweb.link bafybeiapea6l2v2aio6hvjs6vywy6nuhiicvmljt43jtjvu3me2v3ghgmi.ipfs.dweb.link
    1. Pervasive human-driven decline of life on Earthpoints to the need for transformative change

      Title: Pervasive human-driven decline of life on Earth points to the need for transformative change

    1. Levantine overkill: 1.5 million years of hunting down the body size distributionAuthor links open overlay panelJacobDembitzeraRanBarkaibMikiBen-DorbShaiMeiriac

      Title: Levantine overkill: 1.5 million years of hunting down the body size distribution

    1. Ronald Wright: Can We Still Dodge the Progress Trap? Author of 2004’s ‘A Short History of Progress’ issues a progress report.

      Title: Ronald Wright: Can We Still Dodge the Progress Trap? Author of 2004’s ‘A Short History of Progress’ issues a progress report.

      Ronald Wright is the author of the 2004 "A Short History of Progress" and popularized the term "Progress Trap" in the Martin Scroses 2011 documentary based on Wright's book, called "Surviving Progress". Earlier Reesarcher's such as Dan O'Leary investigated this idea in earlier works such as "Escaping the Progress Trap http://www.progresstrap.org/content/escaping-progress-trap-book

    1. Chapter 5: Demand, services and social aspects of mitigation

      Public Annotation of IPCC Report AR6 Climate Change 2022 Mitigation of Climate Change WGIII Chapter 5: Demand, Services and Social Aspects of Mitigation

      NOTE: Permission given by one of the lead authors, Felix Creutzig to annotate with caveat that there may be minor changes in the final version.

      This annotation explores the potential of mass mobilization of citizens and the commons to effect dramatic demand side reductions. It leverages the potential agency of the public to play a critical role in rapid decarbonization.

    1. The richest 10 percent accounted for over half (52 percent) of the emissions added to the atmosphere between 1990 and 2015. The richest one percent were responsible for 15 percent of emissions during this time – more than all the citizens of the EU and more than twice that of the poorest half of humanity (7 percent).

      This is a key leverage point strategy for Stop Reset Go for Rapid Whole System Change (RWSC) strategy. As argued by Kevin Anderson https://youtu.be/mBtehlDpLlU, the wealthy are a crucial subculture to target and success can lead to big decarbonization payoffs.

      The key is to leverage what contemplative practitioners and happiness studies both reveal - after reaching a specific level of material needs being met, which is achievable for staying within planetary boundaries, we don’t need any more material consumption to be happy. We need an anti-money song: https://youtu.be/_awAH-JJx1kamd and enliven Martin Luther King Junior’s quote aspirational: the only time to look down at another person is to give them a hand up. Educate the elites on the critical role they now play to solve the double problem of i equality and runaway carbon emissions.

  12. Jun 2022
    1. it's really worth reading some of the things 00:18:00 that they're saying on climate change now and so what about 2 degrees C that's the 46th pathway that's the thousand Gigaton pathway the two degrees so you 00:18:13 look at the gap but between those two just an enormous that's where where no English edding we're all part of this and that's where we know we have to go from the science and that's where we keep telling other parts of the world begun to try to achieve the problem with 00:18:26 that and there's an engineer this is quite depressing in some respects is that this part at the beginning where we are now is too early for low-carbon supply you cannot build your way out of this with bits of engineering kit and 00:18:39 that is quite depressing because that leaves us with the social implications of what you have to do otherwise but I just want to test that assumption just think about this there's been a lot of discussion I don't know about within Iceland but in the UK quite a lot me 00:18:51 environmentalist have swapped over saying they think nuclear power is the answer or these one of the major answers to this and I'm I remain agnostic about nuclear power yeah it's very low carbon five to 15 grams of carbon dioxide per 00:19:03 kilowatt hour so it's it's similar to renewables and five to ten times lower than carbon capture and storage so nuclear power is very low carbon it has lots of other issues but it's a very low carbon but let's put a bit of 00:19:15 perspective on this we totally we consume in total about a hundred thousand ten watts hours of energy around the globe so just a very large amount of energy lots of energy for those of you I'm not familiar with these units global electricity consumption is 00:19:30 about 20,000 tarantella patelliday hours so 20% of lots of energy so that's our electricity nuclear provides about 11 a half percent of the electricity around the globe of what we consume of our 00:19:42 final energy consumption so that means nuclear provides about two-and-a-half percent of the global energy demand about two and a half percent that's from 435 nuclear power stations provide two 00:19:56 and a half percent of the world's energy demand if you wanted to provide 25% of the world's energy demand you'd probably need something in the region of three or four thousand new nuclear power stations to be built in the next 30 00:20:08 years three or four thousand new nuclear power stations to make a decent dent in our energy consumption and that assumes our energy consumptions remain static and it's not it's going up we're building 70 so just to put some sense 00:20:21 honest you hear this with every technology whether it's wind wave tidal CCS all these big bits of it technology these are going to solve the problem you cannot build them fast enough to get away from the fact that we're going to 00:20:34 blow our carbon budget and that's a really uncomfortable message because no one wants to hear that because the repercussions of that are that we have to reduce our energy demand so we have to reduce demand now now it is really 00:20:48 important the supply side I'm not saying it's not important it is essential but if we do not do something about the men we will not be able to hold to to probably even three degrees C and that's a global analysis and the iron would be 00:21:00 well we have signed up repeatedly on the basis of equity and when we say that we normally mean the poorer parts of the world would be allowed to we'll be able to peak their emissions later than we will be able to in the West that seems a 00:21:13 quite a fair thing that probably but no one would really argue I think against the idea of poor parts the world having a bit more time and space before they move off fossil fuels because there that links to their welfare to their improvements that use of energy now 00:21:27 let's imagine that the poor parts the world the non-oecd countries and I usually use the language of non annex 1 countries for those people who are familiar with that sort of IPCC language let's imagine that those parts of the 00:21:39 world including Indian China could peak their emissions by 2025 that is hugely challenging I think is just about doable if we show some examples in the West but I think it's just about past possible as 00:21:51 the emissions are going up significantly they could peak by 2025 before coming down and if we then started to get a reduction by say 2028 2029 2030 of 6 to 8 percent per annum which again is a 00:22:02 massive reduction rate that is a big challenge for poor parts of the world so I'm not letting them get away with anything here that's saying if they did all of that you can work out what carbon budget they would use up over the century and then you know what total carbon budget is for two degree 00:22:16 centigrade and you can say what's left for us the wealthy parts of the world that seems quite a fair way of looking at this and if you do it like that what's that mean for us that means we'd have to have and I'm redoing this it now 00:22:28 and I think it's really well above 10% because this is based on a paper in 2011 which was using data from 2009 to 10 so I think this number is probably been nearly 13 to 15 percent mark now but about 10 percent per annum reduction 00:22:40 rate in emissions year on year starting preferably yesterday that's a 40 percent reduction in our total emissions by 2018 just think their own lives could we reduce our emissions by 40 percent by 00:22:52 2018 I'm sure we could I'm sure we'll choose not to but sure we could do that but at 70 percent reduction by 2020 for 20-25 and basically would have to be pretty much zero carbon emissions not just from electricity from everything by 00:23:06 2030 or 2035 that sort of timeframe that just this that's just the simple blunt maths that comes out of the carbon budgets and very demanding reduction rates from poorer parts of the world now 00:23:19 these are radical emission reduction rates that we cannot you say you cannot build your way out or you have to do it with with how we consume our energy in the short term now that looks too difficult well what about four degrees six that's what you hear all the time that's too difficult so what about four 00:23:31 degrees C because actually the two degrees C we're heading towards is probably nearer three now anyway so I'm betting on your probabilities so let's think about four degrees C well what it gives you as a larger carbon budget and we all like that because it means I can 00:23:43 attend more fancy international conferences and we can come on going on rock climbing colleges in my case you know we can all count on doing than living the lives that we like so we quite like a larger carbon budget low rates of mitigation but what are the 00:23:54 impacts this is not my area so I'm taking some work here from the Hadley Centre in the UK who did some some analysis with the phone and Commonwealth Office but you're all probably familiar with these sorts of things and there's a range of these impacts that are out there a four degree C global average 00:24:07 means you're going to much larger averages on land because mostly over most of the planet is covered in oceans and they take longer to warm up but think during the heat waves what that might play out to mean so during times 00:24:18 when we're already under stress in our societies think of the European heat wave I don't know whether it got to Iceland or not and in 2003 well it was it was quite warm in the West Europe too warm it's probably much nicer 00:24:31 in Iceland and there were twenty to thirty thousand people died across Europe during that period now add eight degrees on top of that heat wave and it could be a longer heat wave and you start to think that our infrastructure start to break down the 00:24:45 cables that were used to bring power to our homes to our fridges to our water pumps those cables are underground and they're cooled by soil moisture as the soil moisture evaporates during a prolonged heatwave those cables cannot 00:24:56 carry as much power to our fridges and our water pumps so our fridges and water pumps can no longer work some of them will be now starting to break down so the food and our fridges will be perishing at the same time that our neighbors food is perishing so you live 00:25:08 in London eight million people three days of food in the whole city and it's got a heat wave and the food is anybody perishing in the fridges so you think you know bring the food from the ports but the similar problems might be happening in Europe and anyway the tarmac for the roads that we have in the 00:25:19 UK can't deal with those temperatures so it's melting so you can't bring the food up from the ports and the train lines that we put in place aren't designed for those temperatures and they're buckling so you can't bring the trains up so you've got 8 million people in London 00:25:31 you know in an advanced nation that is start to struggle with those sorts of temperature changes so even in industrialized countries you can imagine is playing out quite negatively a whole sequence of events not looking particulate 'iv in China look at the 00:25:44 building's they're putting up there and some of this Shanghai and Beijing and so forth they've got no thermal mass these buildings are not going to be good with high temperatures and the absolutely big increases there and in some parts of the states could be as high as 10 or 12 00:25:56 degrees temperature rises these are all a product of a 4 degree C average temperature

      We have to peak emissions in the next few years if we want to stay under 1.5 Deg C. This talk was given back in 2015 when IPCC was still setting its sights on 2 Deg C.

      This is a key finding for why supply side development cannot scale to solve the problem in the short term. It's impossible to scale rapidly enough. Only drastic demand side reduction can peak emissions and drop drastically in the next few years.

      And if we hit a 4 Deg C world, which is not out of the question as current Business As Usual estimates put us on track between 3 and 5 Deg C, Kevin Anderson cites some research about the way infrastructure systems in a city like London would break down

    1. Before I get started: I'm really excited to be here to just actually watch what's going to happen, from here. So with that said, we're going to start with: What is one of our greatest needs, one of our greatest needs for our brain? And instead of telling you, I want to show you. In fact, I want you to feel it. There's a lot I want you to feel in the next 14 minutes. So, if we could all stand up. 00:00:39 We're all going to conduct a piece of Strauss together. Alright? And you all know it. Alright. Are you ready? Audience: Yeah! Beau Lotto: Alright. Ready, one, two, three! It's just the end. (Music: Richard Strauss "Also Sprach Zarathustra") Right? You know where it's going. (Music) 00:01:13 Oh, it's coming! (Music stops abruptly) Oh! (Laughter) Right? Collective coitus interruptus. OK, you can all sit down. (Laughter) We have a fundamental need for closure. (Laughter) We love closure. (Applause) I was told the story that Mozart, just before he'd go to bed, 00:01:45 he'd go to the piano and go, "da-da-da-da-da." His father, who was already in bed, would think, "Argh." He'd have to get up and hit the final note to the chord before he could go back to sleep. (Laughter) So the need for closure leads us to thinking about: What is our greatest fear? Think -- what is our greatest fear growing up, even now? And it's the fear of the dark. 00:02:15 We hate uncertainty. We hate to not know. We hate it. Think about horror films. Horror films are always shot in the dark, in the forest, at night, in the depths of the sea, the blackness of space. And the reason is because dying was easy during evolution. If you weren't sure that was a predator, it was too late. Your brain evolved to predict. 00:02:42 And if you couldn't predict, you died. And the way your brain predicts is by encoding the bias and assumptions that were useful in the past. But those assumptions just don't stay inside your brain. You project them out into the world.

      A good BEing journey for anticipation. We wait for closure, anticipate what is next based on previous experiences.

      The sand artwork performed by the artist in the background is also a demonstration of anticipation and of symbolic representation - the ubiquity of the symbolosphere.

    1. if the process of seeing differently is the process of first and foremost having awareness of the fact that everything you do has an assumption 00:00:14 figure out what those are and by the way the best person to reveal your own assumptions to you is not yourself it's usually someone else hence the power of diversity the importance of diversity 00:00:26 because not only does that diversity reveal your own assumptions to you but it can also complexify your assumptions right because we know from complex systems theory that the best solution is most likely to 00:00:40 exist within a complex search space not a simple search space simply because of statistics right so whereas a simple search space is more adaptable it's more easily to adapt it's 00:00:52 less likely to contain the best solution so what we really want is a diversity of possibilities a diversity of assumptions which diverse groups for instance enable

      From a Stop Reset Go Deep Humanity perspective, social interactions with greater diversity allows multi-meaningverses to interact and the salience landscape from each conversant can interact. Since each life is unique, the diversity of perspectival knowing allows strengths to overlap weaknesses and different perspectives can yield novelty. The diversity of ideas encounter each other like diversity in a gene pool, evolving more offsprings which may randomly have greater fitness to the environment.

      Johari's window is a direct consequence of this diversity of perspectives, this converged multi-meaningverse of the Lebenswelt..

  13. bafybeiccxkde65wq2iwuydltwmfwv733h5btvyrzqujyrt5wcfjpg4ihf4.ipfs.dweb.link bafybeiccxkde65wq2iwuydltwmfwv733h5btvyrzqujyrt5wcfjpg4ihf4.ipfs.dweb.link
  14. May 2022
    1. “harm-to-help”

      The open access Stop Reset Go meme is the actionable turnaround instrument. When we recognize something is harmful, applying the Stop Reset Go methodology turns around harm to wellbeing by removing the harm but keeping the component that contributes to wellbeing. Myopic, exclusive wellbeing is what can cause harm, Expansive, inclusive wellbeing is a more inclusive wellbeing that includes a wider swath of the biosphere.

    2. The hyper-response aims to deflate or attack the hyperthreat by operating at the microlevel through “mesh-interventions” as well as at the macrolevel through realignment of great nation states and tribes.

      In IPCC AR6 WGIII Parlence, middle actors can mediate a community scale change, which becomes a force multiplier for individual change. Supercharging individual change is what can lead to significant scale of impact through many and many types of mesh interventions. The scale of such mesh interventions will have a "trickle up" effect to affect and accelerate the actions of top down actors.

      This would be truly empowering as the current agency of the individual at the grassroots level is ineffectual.

      Stop Reset Go (SRG) s a simple but powerful meme that is designed to be used by anyone to effect transition. When we recognize that something is harmful and needs to change, SRG can be invoked as a simple rule for transition. The colors of the traffic light are used as a mnemonic aid. If there is a problem with a human process, then STOP. think of an alternative way of achieving the same goal that does not bring about the harm (RESET). When the alternative has been trialed, tested and proven to work without causing more progress traps, then find a way to scale and implement the solution (GO).

      SRG therefore becomes a simple mesh intervention that can be applied at all scales and dimensions. Its iterative and recursive use can be tracked in the Indyweb and interventions can be modeled by AI assistants that can analyze for potential unintended consequences through connections outside the focus area of the designer, and not normally explored by the designers. This augers a truly circular design methodology of the lowest potential impact.

    1. We have engineered our way into a way of life that fundamentally depends on the destruction of nature at scale.

      Gien Interview