238 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2022
    1. I just learned this idea of anchor institution at the Association of Rural and Small Libraries Conference. There are institutions that anchor communities. Right. So that the hospital is one. Lots of people work there. Everyone goes there at some point, has a role to play in the community and the library is similar. You'll often get people who will say that the library's are irrelevant, but that just means that they can afford not to use a public service. And I don't know why they are the people we ask to share their expertise on the use of public services. But most of us use the public library. Our kids get their picture books there. We maybe do passport services. Maybe the library has tech training. One of my first jobs at the public library was teaching senior citizens how to do mouse and keyboarding skills. So where else are you going to learn those things? You learn them at the library.

      Libraries as anchor institutions

      Public libraries, in particular, and the places where anyone in the community can go for services. The mission of the library is to serve the needs of the specific community it is in.

    1. St. Marys resident Hannah Stockman, a stay-at-home mom looking after 13 kids, said the move would be devastating for her and others like her.“At this point, it’s the only space left that we have for the public,” Stockman said. “We don’t have any pool or any other amenities through the community center. So people come here for many, many different reasons.”

      Library as community space

    1. See also Dan Hon’s excellent suggestion for news organizations— or universities, companies, or any organization or institution — to set up their own Mastodon servers to verify and control their users.

      Small town newspapers and libraries could set up Fediverse servers for their constituents as well.

      See also: Hometown by Darius Kazemi

  2. Oct 2022
    1. there is a similar exchange going on when you borrow a book from the library. In fact, libraries are specifically designed to remove the market from the equation entirely, which is why people who use libraries - even though libraries are free - are referred to as “patrons.”

      On the origin of library "patron"

      I'm not sure this is exactly true, but it does make for nice imagery.

  3. Sep 2022
  4. Aug 2022
  5. Jul 2022
  6. May 2022
    1. A seguito della procedura avviata tra la Biblioteca Braidense e gli eredi di Umberto Eco nel 2018, con la registrazione del provvedimento da parte della Corte dei Conti si è concluso infatti in questi giorni l’iter, iniziato nel 2017, di acquisizione della Biblioteca di libri antichi denominata “Bibliotheca semiologica curiosa, lunatica, magica et pneumatica” formata da Umberto Eco nel corso della sua attività di bibliofilo. La collezione antica, che conta circa 1.200 edizioni anteriori al Novecento, un patrimonio che comprende 36 incunaboli e 380 volumi stampati tra il XVI e il XIX secolo sarà custodita dalla Biblioteca Nazionale Braidense di Milano, la Biblioteca Statale che ne garantirà la conservazione, la valorizzazione e la fruizione a studenti e studiosi. Un comitato scientifico formato da cinque membri, di cui due nominati dagli Eredi Eco e due dal Mibact, si occuperà di stabilire le modalità di conservazione anche al fine di garantirne l’unitarietà della consultazione digitale.

      Following the death of Umberto Eco, La Biblioteca Nazionale Braidense in Milan acquired a portion of his collection of books called the “Bibliotheca semiologica curious, lunatic, magical and pneumatic”. The collection comprised about 1,200 antique book including 36 incunabula and 380 volumes printed between the 16th and 19th centuries.

      https://bibliotecabraidense.org/la-biblioteca-braidense-acquisisce-la-biblioteca-di-libri-antichi-di-umberto-eco/

  7. Apr 2022
    1. Since most of our feeds rely on either machine algorithms or human curation, there is very little control over what we actually want to see.

      While algorithmic feeds and "artificial intelligences" might control large swaths of what we see in our passive acquisition modes, we can and certainly should spend more of our time in active search modes which don't employ these tools or methods.

      How might we better blend our passive and active modes of search and discovery while still having and maintaining the value of serendipity in our workflows?

      Consider the loss of library stacks in our research workflows? We've lost some of the serendipity of seeing the book titles on the shelf that are adjacent to the one we're looking for. What about the books just above and below it? How do we replicate that sort of serendipity into our digital world?

      How do we help prevent the shiny object syndrome? How can stay on task rather than move onto the next pretty thing or topic presented to us by an algorithmic feed so that we can accomplish the task we set out to do? Certainly bookmarking a thing or a topic for later follow up can be useful so we don't go too far afield, but what other methods might we use? How can we optimize our random walks through life and a sea of information to tie disparate parts of everything together? Do we need to only rely on doing it as a broader species? Can smaller subgroups accomplish this if carefully planned or is exploring the problem space only possible at mass scale? And even then we may be under shooting the goal by an order of magnitude (or ten)?

    1. The largest pri-vate collections reached 3,000 or 4,500 volumes in the late sixteenth century and tens of thousands of volumes in the mid- eighteenth century. (Hans Sloan owned 45,000 books and 4,000 manuscripts at his death in 1753.)194
    1. same with our with the with the dendrites we will always tell you the story tell the story to the juvenile who's coming through the novices who's coming through the ceremony will tell them so as they 00:47:47 get to a certain age or a certain time or a certain experience in the ceremony we will then pass that knowledge onto him and we'll take it to him so these hieroglyphs and 00:47:58 petroglyphs and the etchings on the rocks and the paintings on there on the cave walls that's our library that is our library

      The dendroglyphs (markings on trees) or the petroglyphs (markings on stone in the stony territories) are the libraries of the indigenous peoples who always relate their stories from the markings back up to the sky.

      via Uncle Ghillar Michael Anderson


      Can this be linked to the practices of the Druids who may have had similar methods? How about linking the petroglyphs in the Celtic (English) countryside?

  8. Mar 2022
    1. Capybara can get us part of the way there. It allows us to work with an API rather than manipulating the HTML directly, but what it provides isn't an application specific API. It gives us low-level API methods like find, fill_in, and click_button, but it doesn't provide us with high-level methods to do things like "sign in to the app" or "click the Dashboard item in the navigation bar".
  9. Feb 2022
    1. Chapter 3: The First Card Index?

      Markus Krajewski outlines some of the history of the creation of the first library card catalog and structures it in such a way as to create parallels between its structure and that of the structure of a modern day computer.

      He covers the creation of catalogs at the court of Vienna, the Vienna University Library, an an attempted but failed national cataloging effort in France called the Bureau de Bibliographie at the Louvre. By 1974 the French effort had at least 1.2 million cards for 3 million volumes.

    2. In preparing these instructions, Gaspard-Michel LeBlond, one of their authors, urges the use of uniform media for registering titles, suggesting that “ catalog materials are not diffi cult to assemble; it is suffi cient to use playing cards [. . .] Whether one writes lengthwise or across the backs of cards, one should pick one way and stick with it to preserve uniformity. ” 110 Presumably LeBlond was familiar with the work of Abb é Rozier fi fteen years earlier; it is unknown whether precisely cut cards had been used before Rozier. The activity of cutting up pages is often mentioned in prior descrip-tions.

      In published instructions issued on May 8, 1791 in France, Gaspard-Michel LeBlond by way of standardization for library catalogs suggests using playing cards either vertically or horizontally but admonishing catalogers to pick one orientation and stick with it. He was likely familiar with the use of playing cards for this purpose by Abbé Rozier fifteen years earlier.

    3. 4. What follows is the compilation of the basic catalog; that is, all book titles are copied on a piece of paper (whose pagina aversa must remain blank) according to a specifi c order, so that together with the title of every book and the name of the author, the place, year, and format of the printing, the volume, and the place of the same in the library is marked.

      Benedictine abbot Franz Stephan Rautenstrauch (1734 – 1785) in creating the Catalogo Topographico for the Vienna University Library created a nine point instruction set for cataloging, describing, and ordering books which included using paper slips.


      Interesting to note that the admonishment to leave the backs of the slips (pagina aversa), in the 1780's seems to make its way into 20th century practice by Luhmann and others.

    4. The undertaking that begins on May 22, 1780, later to be called the Jose-phinian catalog , is extant in “ 205 small boxes ” in an airtight locker in the

      Austrian National Library; it is widely, and often proudly, considered the first card catalog in library history.

      The first card catalogue in library history, later known as the Josephinian catalog, began on May 22, 1780 in the Austrian National Library.

    5. Gabriel Naud é . 31 In contrast to the philosophical encyclopedic systems ruling at that time, he recommends shelving books according to systematic concepts, ordered by academic fi elds and arranged according to current interests.

      Gabriel Naudé recommended shelving books ordered by academic fields and arranging them according to then current interests.

    6. In the Viennese university library, reopened in 1777, instructions for arranging the “ trea-sury of knowledge ” (Leibniz) advise installing books according to a “ sys-tematic plan of the sciences, and consequently according to the future library sections, ” so that every book can be found by means of the code Roman numeral / Roman letter / Arabic numeral (for example XIV.B.12). 2
      1. Rautenstrauch 1778, p. 172. The evident software command follows a deductive logic: the Latin numeral denotes a box, the Latin letter the drawer in the box, and the Arabic numeral the place of the book in the drawer.

      The numbering system for books in the Viennese university library reopened in 1777 had a code system using a Roman numeral / Roman letter / Arabic numeral.

    7. “ Over time, people gradu-ally ceased using a fi xed system that places every single book on a specifi c shelf whose name it bears for good, and moved to a mobil e system. ”

      Library books used to be shelved permanently in the same shelf location, but the systems changed to allow their shelf locations to be mobile.

    8. It seems to be the fate of libraries that a particular order always coincides with a director ’ s term of service. As soon as a new director, prefect, or manager takes over, one of the fi rst acts tends to be rejection of the present order in favor of establishing a new, often completely different one, mostly legiti-mized by the allegedly encountered chaos that almost forces reorganiza-tion.

      This reorganization of library books and location systems with the change of library directors in the late 1700s sounds similar to the sorts of standards problems today.

      https://xkcd.com/927/

  10. Jan 2022
    1. Instead of render props, we use Svelte's slot props: // React version <Listbox.Button> {({open, disabled} => /* Something using open and disabled */)} </Listbox.Button> <!--- Svelte version ---> <ListboxButton let:open let:disabled> <!--- Something using open and disabled ---> </ListboxButton>
    1. I've not seen any doing sessions on Obsidian or Research Rabbit yet, but many (college/university) libraries have group sessions, usually at the outset of quarters/semesters, that walk through the functions in citation managers like Zotero, etc. This might be a useful way of offloading some of the teaching of the technology as well as helping to make it more commonplace across institutions.

  11. Dec 2021
    1. “Any large room looks wrong without the appropriate number of people in it,” Mr. Byers writes. “An unused living room looks empty. An empty ballroom is absolutely creepy; it looks as if it is waiting desperately for something to happen. A library, on the other hand, is delightful when full but still especially attractive when empty.”

      on the coziness of libraries

    1. Leibniz ’ s propos-als for an indispensable library guide that mark the beginning of his activity in Wolfenb ü ttel in December 1690 include ideas on the form of cataloging: “ paper slips of all books, sorted pro materia et autoribus. ” 57 The plan antici-pates registering every book merely once, precisely on a slip of paper, so that the slip only has to be placed in the right order for any catalog organized alphabetically, by subject, or in any other way. Theoretically, this procedure could have successfully made numerous catalogs with the same data set. However, the plan is never carried out. In fact, the librarians supervised by Leibniz manage merely to assemble an alphabetical catalog; all the other plans fail for lack of employees and funding

      Leibnitz created a plan for creating a library card catalog for Wolfenbüttel in December 1690, which would have been similar in form to 20th century card catalogs, but the idea was never carried out for lack of employees and funding.

    2. For a library without a catalog, as Leibniz put it in his Consilium , resembles the ware-house of a businessman who cannot keep stock.
    3. “ The library is the treasury of all wealth of the human mind in which one takes refuge, ” Leibniz writes in a letter to Friedrich of Steinberg in October 1696. 5
  12. aworkinglibrary.com aworkinglibrary.com
    1. I began this site in 2008 in an effort to bring some structure to a long held habit: taking notes about the books I read in a seemingly endless number of notebooks, which then piled up, never to be opened again. I thought a website would make that habit more fruitful and fun, serving as a reference, something the notebooks never did. It did that handily, and more, including making space for me to write and think about adjacent things. More than a dozen years later and this site has become the place where I think, often but not exclusively about books—but then books are a means of listening to the thoughts of others so that you can hear your own thoughts more clearly. Contributions have waxed and waned over the years as life got busy, but I never stopped reading, and I always come back.

      Several things to notice here:

      • learning in public
      • posting knowledge on a personal website as a means of sharing that knowledge with a broader public
      • specifically not hiding the work of reading in notebooks which are unlikely to be read by others.
  13. Nov 2021
    1. I created a social justice metaphor library to help explain concepts like why you can't just create a "level playing field" without acknowledging the economic impacts of history (see, even saying it like that is complicated).

      I love that Dave has started a list of these useful social justice metaphors.

      I got side tracked by the idea this morning and submitted a handful I could think of off the top of my head.

      • Baseball fence
      • Parable of the Polygons
      • Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack

      I'm curious if there are any useful ones in the neurodiversity space? I feel like I need more of these myself.

  14. Oct 2021
  15. Sep 2021
  16. www.library.upenn.edu www.library.upenn.edu
    1. How have chance survivals shaped literary and linguistic canons? How might the topography of the field appear differently had certain prized unica not survived? What are the ways in which authors, compilers, scribes, and scholars have dealt with lacunary exemplaria? How do longstanding and emergent methodologies and disciplines—analysis of catalogs of dispersed libraries, reverse engineering of ur-texts and lost prototypes, digital reconstructions of codices dispersi, digital humanities. and cultural heritage preservation, and trauma studies to name a few,—serve to reveal the extent of disappearance? How can ideologically-driven biblioclasm or the destruction wrought by armed conflicts -- sometimes occurring within living memory -- be assessed objectively yet serve as the basis for protection of cultural heritage in the present? In all cases, losses are not solely material: they can be psychological, social, digital, linguistic, spiritual, professional. Is mournful resignation the only response to these gaps, or can such sentiments be harnessed to further knowledge, understanding, and preservation moving forward?
  17. Aug 2021
    1. Up to 1200 the contents list of a monastic library was usually merely an inventory: it marked the presence of a book, but not its location. The later Middle Ages saw a surge of real catalogues, listing books and their location. Some of these catalogues were written out in books (as we will see in a moment), while others were pasted to the wall in the library.
    1. West, Theatres and Encyclopaedias, ch. 2; Garberson ‘Libraries, Memory and the Spaceof Knowledge’. For a multicultural introduction to the architectural imagery of early modern memory practices, seeSpence, The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci.
    1. This might sound scandalous depending on your understanding of creativity. I'm personally a subscriber to the everything is a remix and great artists steal schools of thought.

      I remember screenwriter Millard Kaufman gesturing to his large home library and saying that he didn't write anything brilliant himself, but that he borrowed from the best.

  18. Jul 2021
    1. Libraries in these scenarios are no longer custodians for the ages of anything, whether tangible or intangible, but rather poolers of funding to pay for fleeting access to knowledge elsewhere.

      A major archiving issue in the digital era is that libraries are no longer the long term storage repositories they have otherwise been for the past two thousand years.

      What effects will this have on the future? Particularly once the financial interests of the owning companies no longer exists?

    2. As Jorge Luis Borges pointed out, a library without an index becomes paradoxically less informative as it grows.

      Explore why this is so from an information theoretic perspective. Is it true?

    1. In 1780, two years after Linnaeus’s death, Vienna’s Court Library introduced a card catalog, the first of its kind. Describing all the books on the library’s shelves in one ordered system, it relied on a simple, flexible tool: paper slips. Around the same time that the library catalog appeared, says Krajewski, Europeans adopted banknotes as a universal medium of exchange. He believes this wasn’t a historical coincidence. Banknotes, like bibliographical slips of paper and the books they referred to, were material, representational, and mobile. Perhaps Linnaeus took the same mental leap from “free-floating banknotes” to “little paper slips” (or vice versa).

      I've read about the Vienna Court Library and their card catalogue. Perhaps worth reading Krajewski for more specifics to link these things together?

      Worth exploring the idea of paper money as a source of inspiration here too.

    1. Der Josephinische Katalog enthielt am Ende inklusive eines ausgefeilten Verweissystems ca. 300.000 Zettel. Dass er aber als erster Zettelkatalog Bibliotheksgeschichte schrieb, lag eher an einem Fehler im Programm. Eigentlich hätten nämlich nach van Swietens Vorstellungen am Ende des Vorgangs alle bibliographischen Angaben von den Zetteln in einen Bandkatalog übertragen werden sollen. Der Grund für diesen Programmierfehler bestand in ökonomischem Kalkül: Der geplante Katalog hätte gut und gerne 50 bis 60 Folio-Bände umfasst und wäre doch kurz nach Fertigstellung schon wieder veraltet gewesen. Darum wurden die Wiener Zettelkästen zur ersten relationalen Suchmaschine mit Erweiterungsfunktion.

      At the end of the Josephine catalog, including a sophisticated system of references, it contained around 300,000 pieces of paper. The fact that he was the first card catalog to write library history was more due to a bug in the program. Actually, according to [Gottfried Freiherr] van Swieten's ideas, at the end of the process all bibliographical information should have been transferred from the slips of paper to a volume catalog. The reason for this programming error was an economic calculation: the planned catalog would have easily comprised 50 to 60 folio volumes and would have been out of date shortly after completion. That is why the Vienna Zettelkästen became the first relational search engine with an expansion function.

      Description of the invention of the first library card catalog?

  19. Jun 2021
  20. booktraces-public.lib.virginia.edu booktraces-public.lib.virginia.edu
    1. Thousands of old library books bear fascinating traces of the past. Readers wrote in their books, and left pictures, letters, flowers, locks of hair, and other things between their pages. We need your help identifying them in the stacks of academic libraries. Together we can find out more about what books were and how they were used by their original owners, while also proving the value of maintaining rich print collections in our libraries.

      A cool looking website focused around curating an interesting collection of books.

      Mentioned by Nate Angell at I Annotate 2021.

    1. Ran across via https://openlibrary.org/developers/api

      OpenBook WordPress Plug-in by John Miedema OpenBook is useful for anyone who wants to add book covers and other book data on a WordPress website. OpenBook links to detailed book information in Open Library, the main data source, as well as other book sites. Users have complete control over the display through templates. OpenBook can link to library records by configuring an OpenURL resolver or through a WorldCat link. OpenBook inserts COinS so that other applications like Zotero can pick up the book data.

    1. Libib is a website & app that catalogs books, movies, music, and video games

      This looks like a pretty solid catalog system for the cloud.

  21. May 2021
  22. Apr 2021
    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Internet Archive</span> in (6) Why Trust A Corporation to Do a Library’s Job? - YouTube (<time class='dt-published'>04/28/2021 11:46:41</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Darius Kazemi randomly tweets out pages from books in the Internet Archive as a means of creating discovery and serendipity.

      Library Futures, Jennie Rose Halperin @Library_futures @little_wow

      Idea of artificial scarcity being imposed on digital objects is a damaging thing for society.

      Ideas to explore:

      Libraries as a free resource could be reframed as a human right within a community.

      Librarians as local community tummelers around information.

      Joanne McNeill

    1. This sounds tangential to the sort of idea that Greg McVerry and I have noodled around with in the past.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Darius Kazemi</span> in Darius Kazemi: "In just a couple hours I'll be speaking with @jom…" - Friend Camp (<time class='dt-published'>04/28/2021 10:19:27</time>)</cite></small>

    1. I LOVE the hover effects for the book covers on this site which is also a great example of someone collecting highlights/annotations of the books they read and hosting them in public on their personal website.

      Melanie has written about the CSS part of the hover effect here: https://melanie-richards.com/blog/highlights-minisite/ and like all awesome things, she's got the site open at https://github.com/melanierichards/highlights. I may have to do some serious digging for figuring out how she's creating the .svg images for the covers though.

  23. Mar 2021
    1. The United States has no real answer to these challenges, and no wonder: We don’t have an internet based on our democratic values of openness, accountability, and respect for human rights. An online system controlled by a tiny number of secretive companies in Silicon Valley is not democratic but rather oligopolistic, even oligarchic.

      Again, a piece that nudges me to thing that a local-based IndieWeb provider/solution would be a good one. Either co-op based, journalism-based, or library-based.

    1. I want the patina of fingerprints, the quiet and comfortable background hum of a library.

      A great thing to want on a website! A tiny hint of phatic interaction amongst internet denizens.

    1. A news co-op is a news organization owned by its readers, whose membership fees pay for open access journalism – no paywall – usually organized as nonprofits (an IRS rule-change lets for-profit newspaper convert to nonprofits).

      I'm sort of wishing that we could also have social media co-ops. I suspect that there are a few on Mastodon that operate like this, but it would be interesting to see some focused around in-person communities as well.

      Why couldn't my local library run a town/city-based social media co-op?

      For this matter, why couldn't my local news co-op also run it's own social media platform?

    1. Amazon is making many books exclusive to their platform and not allowing libraries digital access.

      Maybe worth looking at what they're doing and how those practices mirror those of academic journal publishing for creating monopolies.

    1. But I believe the core philosophy of tiny modules is actually sound and easier to maintain than giant frameworks.
    2. he goes on to talk about third party problems and how you're never guaranteed something is written correctly or that even if it is you don't know if it's the most optimal solution
    3. "Functions Are Not Packages" - Well why not?
    4. Small modules are extremely versatile and easy to compose together in an app with any number of other modules that suit your needs.
    5. Write modules that are small. Iterate quickly.
  24. Feb 2021
    1. The bare bones operation without any Trailblazery is implemented in the trailblazer-operation gem and can be used without our stack.
    2. While Trailblazer offers you abstraction layers for all aspects of Ruby On Rails, it does not missionize you. Wherever you want, you may fall back to the "Rails Way" with fat models, monolithic controllers, global helpers, etc. This is not a bad thing, but allows you to step-wise introduce Trailblazer's encapsulation in your app without having to rewrite it.
    3. Only use what you like.
    4. you can pick which layers you want. Trailblazer doesn't impose technical implementations
    1. {a: 1, b: 2, c: 3, d: 4} => {a:, b:, **rest} # a == 1, b == 2, rest == {:c=>3, :d=>4}

      equivalent in javascript:

      {a, b, ...rest} = {a: 1, b: 2, c: 3, d: 4}
      

      Not a bad replacement for that! I still find javascript's syntax a little more easily readable and natural, but given that we can't use the same syntax (probably because it would be incompatible with existing syntax rules that we can't break for compatibility reasons, unfortunately), this is a pretty good compromise/solution that they've come up with.

    1. I can even imagine a distant future where governments might sponsor e.g. social networking as a social service. I know many people don’t trust their governments, but when it comes down to it they’re more likely to be working in people’s interests than a group of unelected tech barons responsible only to their shareholders at best, or themselves in the cases where they have dual class stock with unequal voting rights, or even their families for 100s of years.

      Someone suggesting government run social media. There are potential problems, but I'm definitely in for public libraries doing this sort of work/hosting/maintenance.

  25. Jan 2021
  26. Dec 2020
    1. Best Android Libraries

      We have written this article for app developers who are interested in the creation of Android Apps utilizing the latest of libraries and contributing their best towards the Android App Development Company .

  27. Nov 2020
    1. Is there any service that does this sort of alert when my library gets a book I want?

      Not quite the functionality you're looking for, but in the same sort of vein as WorldCat:

      Library Extension is a browser extension that works on Amazon, Goodreads (and possibly other book sites) that allows you to register your favorite local libraries, and when you look up books on those services, it automatically searches and shows you which are available at your local library. One click and you can usually download or reserve a copy quickly for pick up.

    1. Converting Angular components into Svelte is largely a mechanical process. For the most part, each Angular template feature has a direct corollary in Svelte. Some things are simpler and some are more complex but overall it's pretty easy to do.