110 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2022
    1. They are 100% identical; just different names. From podman-build: “Builds an image using instructions from one or more Containerfiles or Dockerfiles and a specified build context directory. A Containerfile uses the same syntax as a Dockerfile internally. For this document, a file referred to as a Containerfile can be a file named either ‘Containerfile’ or ‘Dockerfile’.”
    1. es the sad fate of M. Fulgence Tapir to his neglecting the mechaniside of historiography.

      neglecting the mechanical side of historiography

      the mechanical side of historiography is a round about way of saying note taking using a card index or zettelkasten.

    2. le guidance. It has even a touch ohumour in it, as when he remarks, " Saints, Popes, Kings, Jews aWelshmen may be regarded as having no surnames " ; and the woerr
  2. Oct 2022
    1. Nicht wenige Kästen sind nur für ein einziges Buch angelegt worden, Siegfried Kracauers Sammlungen etwa zu seiner Monographie über Jacques Offenbach, das Bildarchiv des Historikers Reinhart Koselleck mit Abteilungen Tausender Fotos von Reiterdenkmälern beispielsweise oder der Kasten des Romanisten Hans Robert Jauß, in dem er für seine Habilitationsschrift mittelalterliche Tiernamen und -eigenschaften verzettelte.

      machine translation (Google)

      Quite a few boxes have been created for just one book, Siegfried Kracauer's collections for his monograph on Jacques Offenbach, for example, the photo archive of the historian Reinhart Koselleck with sections of thousands of photos of equestrian monuments, for example, or the box by the Romanist Hans Robert Jauß, in which he wrote for his Habilitation dissertation bogged down medieval animal names and characteristics.

      A zettelkasten need not be a lifetime practice and historically many were created for supporting a specific project or ultimate work. Examples can be seen in the work of both Robert Green and his former assistant Ryan Holiday who kept separate collections for each of their books, as well as those displayed at the German Literature Archive in Marbach (2013) including Siegfried Kracauer (for a monograph on Jacques Offenbach), Reinhart Koselleck (equestrian related photos), Hans Robert Jauß (a dissertation on medieval animal names and characteristics).

    1. https://en.forum.saysomethingin.com/t/hills-and-mountains-in-welsh/36923

      • twyn - hill(ock), mound, knoll, hummock, heap, peak, dune, molehill
      • tyle - hill(ock) (with a suggestion of steepness)
      • allt - hill(side), steep gradient, cliff, wooded slope
      • bryn - hill, hillock, mountain
      • gallt - slope, hill, cliff, rock, wooded hillside
      • garth - mountain ridge, promontory hill, wooded slope
      • rhiw - steep slope, hill(side) (more commonly used in the SW)
      • bryncyn - hillock, knoll, tump, mound, heap
      • poncen/ponc/poncyn - hillock, tump, knoll, rising ground (more commonly used in the N)
      • trip - steep hill (relating to a road or path) (more commonly used in SE)
      • banc - rising ground, hillock, ridge, slope
      • moel - bare mountain, treeless hill, summit, rounded mountain
      • mynydd - mountain, large hill
      • ban (pl. bannau) - top, tip, summit, crest, peak, beacon, hill, mountain, bare hill
  3. Aug 2022
  4. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Charles

      Charles is obviously a family name (Charles Musgrove, Mary's husband; Charles Musgrove, Mary's son; Charles Hayter and one can presume Charles Musgrove senior, Mary's father in law). Names were often reused - Austen makes fun of it in the first chapter "all the Marys and Elizabeths".

  5. Jul 2022
    1. Glad I'm not the only one...

      Depending on my particular mood, I'll call mine "Konrad" after Gessner, "Beatrice" after Webb, or "Bruce" (a quirky hat tip to The West Wing S7 E2: "His name is Bruce. He's a flight attendant on Aer Lingus. They've got a connecting hub out of Hamburg. You know, at first it was long walks along the Reeperbahn...")

      https://www.reddit.com/r/antinet/comments/w0x1m6/give_your_antinet_a_pen_name/

    1. Clack

      Her name is an onomatopoeia for a sharp and sudden, obtrusive sound, similar to how she imposes herself onto people like trying to convert Mrs. Verinder

    2. Sergeant Cuff;

      Another instance of a name reflecting the traits or role of a person. English last names tend to reflect the occupation of the family, i.e. Fletcher as a last name typically comes from family that had something to do with arrowsmithing or archery.

  6. May 2022
  7. Mar 2022
    1. The reason for the new name is that the "dist-upgrade" name was itself extremely confusing for many users: while it was named that because it was something you needed when upgrading between distribution releases, it sounded too much as though it was only for use in that circumstance, whereas in fact it's much more broadly applicable.
    1. https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/.premium-the-pagan-gods-that-still-exist-in-israeli-city-names-1.8924898?v=1647845941967

      Cities in Israel named after Semitic gods of the ancient Near East.

      Jerusalem was likely originally Ir Shalem ('The City of Shalem') because the central shrine was dedicated to the Canaanite god Shalem, aka Salem, the personification of the Evening Star.

      Shahar, the twin brother of Shalem, was the personification of the Morning Star and was presumably the tutelary god of Zareth-Shahar. This town is in modern day central Jordan and was mentioned in Joshua 13:19.

      While the original Zareth-Shahar didn't survive into modernity, another town dedicated to the same god may have existed on the southern shore of the Sea of Galilee at a site known by the Arabic name for the morning star. A kibbutz named Ayelet HaShachar was built there after 1915. Ayelet HaShachar is a poetic biblical term for the Morning Star (Psalms 22:1).

      Jericho may have taken it's name from the tutelary god Yareakh, the moon god.

      Similarly the site Beit Yarekh may attest to that moon god being worshiped there as well.

      The sun god Shemesh may have created the eponymous names for cities Beth-Shemesh ('House of Shemesh', Joshua 15:10), En-Shemesh ('Spring of Shemesh", Joshua 15:7), and Ir-Shemesh ('City of Shemesh", Joshua 19:41). The modern day city Beit Shemesh was established in 1950 at a site with the Arabic place name 'Ain Shems which was believed to be the site of the ancient city Beth-Shemesh.

      The storm god Baal is the root of cities including Kiryat Baal (Joshua 18:14), Baal Perazim (II Samuel 5:17), Gur Baal (II Chronicles 26:7), Baal-Gad (Joshua 11:17), Baal-Hermon (Judges 3:3), and Baal-Hazor (II Samuel 13:23). There are also cities Baal-Peor (Numbers 23:28) and Ball Shalishah (II Kings 4:42).

      Canaanite god El was the tutelary god of the town Bethel mentioned frequently in the Old Testament including in Genesis 12:8. The Palestinian town Beitin is thought to be the site of the ancient Bethel. Beit El, an Israeli settlement, was created near it in 1977.

      Dagon was the namesake of Beth Dagon (Joshua 15:41). It continued until 1948 when the Palestinian town Bayt Dajan was depopulated leading up to the Israeli War of Independence. The site is now an Israeli town called Beit Dagan.

      Reshef, an ancient Semitic god from Elba and later identified with Apollo lent his name to the todays Arsuf, which is also known as Apollonia. During the Persian period, the Phoenicians had named a town there for Reshef.

      Horon, possibly a desert god with power over animals and snakes, is the inspiration of Beth Horon (I Chronicles 7:24). A modern settlement Beit Horon was founded in 1977.

    2. In ancient times, it was common for towns to be named for the town’s main shrine and the tutelary deity worshipped therein. Thus many of the towns and cities mentioned in the Bible, even those said to have been home to Israelites, have the names of foreign gods embedded in them.
    1. Dagon’s father was El, the head of the West Semitic pantheon. The name Israel, shows that El was originally the tutelary god of Israel (it’s right there in the name!), but over time, Yahweh took El’s place:“When the Most High (El Elyon) divided to the nations their inheritance, when he separated the sons of Adam, he set the bounds of the people according to the number of the children of Israel. For the Lord's (Yahweh’s) portion is his people; Jacob is the lot of his inheritance” (Deuteronomy 32:8-9).

      In the West Semitic pantheon of gods, El was the father of Dagon who was in turn the father of Baal. El Elyon is mentioned in Deuteronomy 32:8-9 and his name is a root word of the endonym Israel.

  8. Feb 2022
    1. Is the name "delegated type" up for review? I don't see any delegation happening in the code. It looks more like a "subtype", or "secondary type", or something like that.
    1. a recitation of their names will be accompanied by a traditional libation, or pouring out of water, in accordance with West African traditions for honoring the deceased. "The ritual of libation holds the belief that saying people's names keeps them alive. It makes them free. It carries their personhood beyond their physical time on this earth," says event organizer Jasmine Blanks Jones, a postdoctoral fellow in the Program in Racism, Immigration, and Citizenship who is also part of Inheritance Baltimore, an interdisciplinary program for humanities education, research, and community engagement in Baltimore.

      The West African tradition of libation, or pour out of water, honors the deceased and holds the belief that saying people's names aloud keeps them alive.

  9. Jan 2022
    1. Where To Write?Search Maybe not so much on Twitter. [Update: Useful pointers in the comments, and also I just ran across Birdfeeder; obviously this is a hot spot.]

      Birdfeeder could be a good name for a service that transports one's Twitter output to their digital garden.

    1. Theircontemporary descendants prefer Wendat (pronounced ‘Wen-dot’), noting that ‘Huron’ was originally an insult, meaning(depending on the source) either ‘pig-haired’ or ‘malodorous’.
  10. Sep 2021
    1. Do not use articles in front of product names. For example, do not write "the JBoss Enterprise Application Platform was..."
    1. At the most foundational level, everything in the world is named: dwarves, elves, fortresses, fell beasts, books, artifacts, lands, and even the world itself are all given custom names, often in fictional languages complete with English translations.

      if it's important to someone, it's got a name. It's fun, but Tolkein's extensive use of incomprehensible names was always an unpleasant challenge for me.

    1. I feel like app/packs (or something like it) is a good name because it communicates to developers that it's not just JavaScript that can be bundled, it's also CSS, images, SVGs — you name it. I realize what can be bundled is wholly dependent on the bundler you use, but even esbuild supports bundling CSS. So couldn't this possibly be confusing?
  11. Aug 2021
    1. Aaron linkt in zijn blogpost aan meer bronnen die ik zeker eens verder wil onderzoeken voor mijn eigen Frankopedia.

      I love that Frank calls his personal wiki / digital garden / online commonplace book "Frankopedia".

      I should come up with a more clever name for mine.

  12. Jul 2021
    1. Ezra Jennings.

      Ezra comes form Hebrew word "azar," means "help", "aid" and "protect. [Jennings] (http://www.irishsurnames.com/cgi-bin/gallery.pl?name=jennings&capname=Jennings&letter=j) is a baptismal name means "son of John."

    2. Drusilla

      This is the first time Miss Rachel has call Miss Clack as Drusilla. What's Miss Rachel's intention?

  13. Jun 2021
    1. If they did I think there would actually be some quality of discussion, and it might be useful

      I used to think this. (That isn't to say I've changed my mind. I'm just not convinced one way or the other.)

      Another foreseeable outcome, relative to the time when the friend here was making the comment, is that it would lead to people being nastier in real life. Whether that's true or not (and I think that it might be), Twitter has turned out to be a cesspool, and it has shown us that people are willing to engage in all sorts of nastiness under their real name.

  14. May 2021
    1. Here's the video version of this article: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yLQ6XlG0MQ4

    2. You don't have to be a Welsh speaker to realise these place names make Wales different.They connect us to our history and our shared identity.
    3. But, and this is a big but, replacing Welsh place names with English ones, just because some people can't pronounce them or they just don't like the sound of them, is not ok.It's deleting your cultural distinctiveness. Your heritage and the uniqueness of these British islands. It's getting rid of one of the oldest languages in Europe, one place name at a time.
    1. Place names and songlines together reminds me of a great BBC segment "Disappearing Welsh Names" I saw recently: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yLQ6XlG0MQ4

      It highlights by analogy the value of indigenous culture, knowledge, and creativity which the survival of songlines also provides us with. (It also saddens me because it starkly reminds me of all the knowledge and languages we've lost already.)

      I've been learning Welsh since the pandemic started and just a few simple words of Welsh has given me a far greater appreciation of places in the UK and what they mean. It's helped not only to expand my vocabulary, but increased my creativity in creating local songlines. It's also made it much easier to learn to say and remember the town of Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch.

      <table> <thead><tr> <th>Cymraeg</th> <th>Meaning</th> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>Aber</td> <td>Where one river flows into another body of water (example: Aberystwyth)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Ban, Bannau</td> <td>Peak(s), beacon(s)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Bron</td> <td>Breast of a hill</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Bryn</td> <td>Hill</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Caer</td> <td>Fort</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Cas</td> <td>Castle</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Crug</td> <td>Hill, tump</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Cwm</td> <td>Valley</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Derw, Deri</td> <td>Oaks</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Dinas</td> <td>Hill-fort</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Dyffryn</td> <td>Valley, vale</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Ffin</td> <td>Border, boundary</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Isaf</td> <td>Lower, lowest</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Llan</td> <td>Church, church land (often followed by the name of the saint to whom the church was dedicated, eg, Llangatwg - a place with a church dedicated to St Catwg)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Morfa</td> <td>Salt-marsh</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Nant</td> <td>Brook, dingle</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Pont</td> <td>Bridge</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Porth</td> <td>Gate</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Rhos</td> <td>Moor</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Tyle</td> <td>Hill-side, ascent</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Uchaf</td> <td>Upper, highest</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Ystrad</td> <td>Vale</td> </tr> </tbody> </table>

      It also uncovers quirks of place names like Breedon on the Hill which translates from Brythonic, Saxon, and Modern English to "Hill Hill on the Hill" and crystalizes, as if in amber, the fact that Brythonic, Saxon, and English speakers all conjoined for a time on a hill in England. Similarly there's also Barnack Hills in England which translates from old Celtic (barr), Scottish Gaelic (cnoc) and English as "flat topped hill hill hills". It's almost hillarious.

    1. Article about the renaming of Welsh place names into English which erases culture and history.

    2. The Welsh name for Snowdon, Yr Wyddfa, means grave and is pronounced like "er with-va".The story goes in a legend that the giant Rhita Gawr, the king of Wales, was buried under a cairn of stones on the summit of the mountain, following a battle with King Arthur.It is said that the giant defeated 30 kings of Britain, taking their beards to create a cloak of the beards, reaching from his shoulder to the floor.
    3. Australia's giant monolith Ayers Rock was renamed Uluru in 1993, switching from its colonial namesake, former South Australian Premier Sir Henry Ayers, to the language of its traditional owners, the Anangu people.In 2002, that dual name was officially reversed, making it Uluru/Ayers Rock. Almost all Australians now refer to it as Uluru.
    4. The highest mountain in the world, Mount Everest, is not commonly known by its Tibetan name Chomolungma, meaning goddess mother of the world.Many Sherpas, a community indigenous to the Himalayan region, believe that the summit of Chomolungma is home to the Buddhist goddess Miyolangsangma.Its English name comes from Colonel Sir George Everest, who was born in Crickhowell, Powys, in 1790, who was a Surveyor General of India.
  15. Apr 2021
      • Llyn Bochlwyd (lake gray cheek)
      • Foel Fawr
      • Coed Llugwy
      • Cwm Cneifion

      Erasure of culture

      Memory and place names

      "A nation which forgets its past has no future." - Winston Churchill (check quote and provenance)

    1. why do you guys think have_css matcher is named the way it is? I mean, it sure deals with css identifiers, but have_css gives(at least to me) the impression that the page has certain stylesheet loading.
  16. Mar 2021
    1. place

      place?

      to me that connotes a physical location.

      How can they be using that in semantics? Is that a common term/jargon used in the terminology/lexicon of semantics?

    1. non-regression testing

      That would probably be a better name because you're actually testing/verifying that there hasn't been any regression.

      You're testing for the absence of regression. But I guess testing for one also tests for the other, so it probably doesn't matter. (If something is not true you know it is false, etc.)

    1. The word authority in authority control derives from the idea that the names of people, places, things, and concepts are authorized, i.e., they are established in one particular form.
  17. Feb 2021
    1. It’s kind of like putting a SIM card in a cell phone – the SIM card tells that phone, “Hey, you work with this particular phone number now.” Just like you can switch out a phone’s SIM card and make the phone work with a different phone number, your domain can be set to work with a different web hosting service.
    1. In the mid-20th century, Kripke, along with a number of other philosophers including Ruth Barcan Marcus, Hilary Putnam and David Kaplan, overthrew this consensus, arguing that many terms refer, not by way of things fitting some associated mental checklist, but directly.

      The shift in the idea of naming things.

  18. Dec 2020
    1. delete is a reserved word in JavaScript. To handle DELETE requests, export a function called del instead.
  19. Nov 2020
  20. Oct 2020
    1. Note that the fields are kept in a flat structure, so a "deep" field like "shipping.address.street" will be at the key "shipping.address.street", with the dots included.
    1. Could I also use Indie Web tools for a persona, or is that not in keeping with the community?

      The community is all about websites and identity, so having a website for a pen name is exactly the sort of thing you should definitely do! I'm sure there are a few who have done it, but I'm unaware of any documenting it yet. Starting a stub page on the wiki for pen name could be a good start if you do.

    1. Yet even before Clubhouse launches, it has encountered issues that larger social media companies struggle with. On Sunday, the entrepreneur Sriram Krishnan changed his name on the app to Tim Cook, Apple’s chief executive, as a prank. More than 100 people immediately joined the room.Hours later, someone impersonated Mr. Musk, the Tesla chief. That led MC Hammer, a Clubhouse user, to publicly call on the company to institute a real name policy. “Real identity !!! Be accountable for your words and opinions,” he tweeted.
    1. As ugly a name as need be

      interesting that betteredge makes this comment on ezra jennings. there seems to have been traces of significance in the names of multiple characters (i.e. betteredge, spearman, sergeant cuff is particularly on the nose) and yet ezra jennings doesn't seem to hold the same weight in describing the character though this is the one betteredge chooses to comment on

  21. Sep 2020
    1. Why the obfuscation of remaining to r and callbacks to c? This is fine for function-local variables but in this instance makes the code significantly harder to reason about? There is no notion of what c and r mean.
    1. While there is some precedence in other frameworks for using as, the word doesn't fit well. Since you are adding functionality to elements I like the word add better (and it only has 1 more character).
    1. You aren't wasting energy inventing class names. No more adding silly class names like sidebar-inner-wrapper just to be able to style something, and no more agonizing over the perfect abstract name for something that's really just a flex container.
  22. Aug 2020
  23. Jul 2020
    1. It is not unusual for one individual to possess several dozen different usernames and passwords.

      Having multiple names is an interesting manifestation of having multiple identities. Do you tend to use your "real" name, a consistent username across services, or different usernames based on the kind of service? What happens when those contexts collapse (like when you give a work acquaintance your personal email address).

    1. The middle character, Ze, is a generational name, and is common to all his siblings (such as his brothers and sister, 毛泽民 (Mao Ze Min), 毛泽覃 (Mao Ze Tan), and 毛泽紅 (Mao Ze Hong)).

      interesting, did not know that. How are these generational characters determined?

  24. Jun 2020
    1. In systems engineering and requirements engineering, a non-functional requirement (NFR) is a requirement that specifies criteria that can be used to judge the operation of a system, rather than specific behaviors. They are contrasted with functional requirements that define specific behavior or functions

      This is a strange term because one might read "non-functional" and interpret in the sense of the word that means "does not function", when instead the intended sense is "not related to function". Seems like a somewhat unfortunate name for this concept. A less ambiguous term could have been picked instead, but I don't know what that would be.

  25. May 2020
    1. "linked data" can and should be a very general term referring to any structured data that is interlinked/interconnected.

      It looks like most of this article describes it in that general sense, but sometimes it talks about URIs and such as if they are a necessary attribute of linked data, when that would only apply to Web-connected linked data. What about, for example, linked data that links to each other through some other convention such as just a "type" and "ID"? Maybe that shouldn't be considered linked data if it is too locally scoped? But that topic and distinction should be explored/discussed further...

      I love its application to web technologies, but I wish there were a distinct term for that application ("linked web data"?) so it could be clearer from reading the word whether you meant general case or not. May not be a problem in practice. We shall see.

      Granted/hopefully most use of linked data is in the context of the Web, so that the links are universal / globally scoped, etc.

    1. This change was made because GitLab License Management is now renamed to GitLab License Compliance. After review with users and analysts, we determined that this new name better indicates what the feature is for, aligns with existing market terminology, and reduces confusion with GitLab subscription licensing features.
  26. Apr 2020
    1. The common law—so named because it was "common" to all the king's courts across England—originated in the practices of the courts of the English kings in the centuries following the Norman Conquest in 1066.[10] The British Empire spread the English legal system to its colonies, many of which retain the common law system today. These "common law systems" are legal systems that give great weight to judicial precedent, and to the style of reasoning inherited from the English legal system.
    2. the body of law derived from judicial decisions of courts and similar tribunals.[1][2][3][4][5][6] The defining characteristic of “common law” is that it arises as precedent.

      The way "common law" sounds and is used, I would have thought it meant law that is common (in common between) many countries, laws that can be found on the books in all of these many places. (Kind of like commonwealth.)

      But, although it is common to many countries, that is not its defining characteristic. Its defining characteristic is actually something quite different.

      Since the term is so far removed from what it actually means, I would even go so far as to say it is a mild euphemism.

      Much better names for this exist: judicial precedent or judge-made law are the clearest options. But even "case law" is a better term.

    1. The “universal” label that has been slapped on to it is superfluous, but it does have its merits. Now that we have a commonly known term to refer to environment agnostic JavaScript code, it allows library authors to list it as a feature and be fashionable doing it. I’m happy with the term “universal” being fashionable because it makes developers think about their dependencies on the runtime environment. In the end this will help the JavaScript ecosystem mature and allow libraries to be used everywhere.
    2. The “universal” label that has been slapped on to it is superfluous
    1. It’s true that there are two hard problems in computer science and one of them is naming things. Why? Because good names are important. A good name teaches about purpose and responsibility, so you have to spend some time thinking about it.
  27. Mar 2020
    1. Don't be discouraged when you get feedback about a method that isn't all sunshine and roses. Facets has been around long enough now that it needs to maintain a certain degree of quality control, and that means serious discernment about what goes into the library. That includes having in depth discussions the merits of methods, even about the best name for a method --even if the functionality has been accepted the name may not.

      about: merits

  28. Dec 2019
  29. Aug 2019
  30. Jul 2019
  31. May 2019
    1. All "mainline" beers based on historic railroad culture; Many mentions of local ingredients; many mentions of brewed in the "classic style of...."

  32. Feb 2019
    1. Many •. ,~ . .• .., words name r

      Names...connects to...someone? I can't remember.

    2. real constitution, or (as it is apt to be called) essence, being utterly unknown to us, any sound that is put to stand for it must be very un· certain in its application;

      Basically, be careful about naming anything that has an essence that's unknown to us, and it seems that most everything has an uncertain essence, so...

    3. Names, therefore, that stand for collections of ideas which the mind makes at pleasure must needs be of doubtful signification, when such collections are nowhere to be found constantly united in nature

      Significance of names again, which play a role in Annihilation

      When people/things are stripped of their names (aka "doubtful significations"), are they brought to more simple concepts? Are they more easily understood?

      Or are they the same complex concept, only now without a name?

      Or perhaps the loss of name illustrates the complexity of the concept, where a name might lull us into confidence, into thinking we have a handle on the concept...

  33. Jan 2019
    1. The name Vatican city was first used in the Lateran Treaty, signed on 11 February 1929, which established the modern city-state. The name is taken from Vatican Hill, the geographic location of the state. "Vatican" is derived from the name of an Etruscan settlement, Vatica or Vaticum meaning garden, located in the general area the Romans called vaticanus ager, "Vatican territory".

      Named after "the" hill...

    1. “There are only three places that have a ‘the’ in the front of their name: the Vatican, The Hague, and the Bronx.” —Mary Higgins Clark
  34. Aug 2018
    1. “I thought it was a joke at first, to be contacted by someone named ‘Alastair Mactaggart,’ ” says Chris Jay Hoofnagle,

      This seems like the pot calling the kettle...

  35. Mar 2018
    1. Voyager record

      The voyager record represents us as humans, the purpose of this was to relate the message to someone who doesn't even live on Earth hence "aliens". This can also be compared to the aids project in which we are supposed to create a post so that someone who knows nothing about it can understand it based on the information you provide to them.

  36. Jun 2017
  37. Jan 2017
  38. Sep 2016
    1. acceptable for parents to, say, name a girl Jack or a boy Lisa

      Swedes won't let you call you boy Sue.

    2. Activists are lobbying for parents to be able to choose any name for their children (there are currently just 170 legally recognized unisex names in Sweden).

      Sweden has only 170 legally recognised unisex names (i.e. the Swedes control the names you can give your kids).

  39. Dec 2014
  40. Jul 2014