170 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2024
  2. Dec 2023
    1. the overwhelming majority of people support are not on the political agenda which is why this whole the idea that there is a center in politics is a complete fiction
      • for: quote - there is no center, it's a fiction, quote - James Schneider - Progressive International

      • quote

      • key point
        • the things that the overwhelming majority of people support are not on the political agenda
          • which is why this whole the idea that there is a center in politics is a complete fiction
        • Elite consensus opinion is almost always massively in the minority
          • and so you have to work very hard to prevent things which are massively in the majority from getting political expression
        • Polling between 2/3 and 3/4 of people support (including generally speaking the majority of people who voted in the last election support) things like
          • public ownership of
            • energy
            • water
            • rail
            • mail, etc
          • a 15 pound an hour minimum wage
          • a wealth tax
      • All of these things considered way way on the left are not on the left, that's actually the center if you're talking about where is the mainstream British public opinion - and it's such strong public opinion because no one ever says it in the public sphere and when they do they are ridiculed
      • author: James Schneider, Progressive International
      • date: Dec, 2023
    1. the modern economic system the modern Financial system is based on the same 00:11:02 principle the most successful fiction ever created is not any God it's money
      • for: example - fiction - money

      • comment

        • money is also a fiction, possibly the most powerful one humans have ever created.
  3. Oct 2023
    1. The narrative technique owes a good deal to W. G. Sebald, who loved to ruminate on strange and troubling episodes from history, blurring the boundary between fact and fiction.

      Benjamín Labatut also falls into this genre.

  4. Sep 2023
    1. R.U.R.: Rossum’s Universal Robots, drama in three acts by Karel Čapek, published in 1920 and performed in 1921. This cautionary play, for which Čapek invented the word robot (derived from the Czech word for forced labour), involves a scientist named Rossum who discovers the secret of creating humanlike machines. He establishes a factory to produce and distribute these mechanisms worldwide. Another scientist decides to make the robots more human, which he does by gradually adding such traits as the capacity to feel pain. Years later, the robots, who were created to serve humans, have come to dominate them completely.
  5. Aug 2023
    1. Question: fiction and non-fiction .t3_164ob1y._2FCtq-QzlfuN-SwVMUZMM3 { --postTitle-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postTitleLink-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postBodyLink-VisitedLinkColor: #989898; }

      For those that do both fiction and non-fiction work in their zettelkasten, do you consider the portion dedicated to fiction a "department" or a "compartment" within it? or perhaps something altogether different?

    1. The Snowflake Method is more specific, but broadly similar to those who build out plot using index cards.

      As examples, see Dustin Lance Black and Benjamin Rowland.

      Link to - https://hypothes.is/a/043JIlv5Ee2_eMf1TTV7ig - https://hypothes.is/a/ibFMareUEe2bqSdWdE046g

    2. Ingermanson, Randy. “The Snowflake Method For Designing A Novel.” Advanced Fiction Writing, circa 2013. https://www.advancedfictionwriting.com/articles/snowflake-method/.

      Designing writing in ever more specific and increasing levels. Start with a logline, then a paragraph, then acts, etc.

      Roughly the advice I've given many over the years based on screenplay development experience, but with a clever name based on the Koch snowflake.

    3. you only have to solve a limited set of problems, and so you can write relatively fast.
    4. If there’s no conflict, you’ll know it here and you should either add conflict or scrub the scene.
    5. The first thing to do is to take that four-page synopsis and make a list of all the scenes that you’ll need to turn the story into a novel. And the easiest way to make that list is . . . with a spreadsheet.

      Of course spreadsheets are databases of information and one can easily and profitably put all these details into index cards which are just as easy (maybe even easier) to move around

    6. Take as much time as you need to do this, because you’re just saving time downstream.

      this=character development

    7. If you believe in the Three-Act structure, then the first disaster corresponds to the end of Act 1. The second disaster is the mid-point of Act 2. The third disaster is the end of Act 2, and forces Act 3 which wraps things up. It is OK to have the first disaster be caused by external circumstances, but I think that the second and third disasters should be caused by the protagonist’s attempts to “fix things”. Things just get worse and worse.

      Interesting and specific advice about the source of disasters in act two...

    8. Good fiction doesn’t just happen, it is designed. You can do the design work before or after you write your novel.
    1. N+7 algorithm used by the Oulipo writers. This algorithm replaces every noun—every person, place, or thing—in Hacking the Academy with the person, place, or thing—mostly things—that comes seven nouns later in the dictionary. The results of N+7 would seem absolutely nonsensical, if not for the disruptive juxtapositions, startling evocations, and unexpected revelations that ruthless application of the algorithm draws out from the original work. Consider the opening substitution of Hacking the Academy, sustained throughout the entire book: every instance of the word academy is literally an accident.

      How might one use quirky algorithms in interestingly destructive or even generative ways to combinatorially create new things?

  6. May 2023
    1. Tinderbox Meetup - Sunday, May 7, 2023 Video: Connect with Sönke Ahrens live, the author of How to Take Smart Notes

      reply for Fidel at https://forum.eastgate.com/t/tinderbox-meetup-sunday-may-7-2023-video-connect-with-sonke-ahrens-live-the-author-of-how-to-take-smart-notes/6659

      @fidel (I'm presuming you're the same one from the meetup on Sunday, if not perhaps someone might tag the appropriate person?), I was thinking a bit more on your question of using physical index cards for writing fiction. You might find the examples of both Vladimir Nabokov and Dustin Lance Black, a screenwriter, useful as they both use index card-based workflows.

      Vladimir Nabokov died in 1977 leaving an unfinished manuscript in note card form for the novel The Original of Laura . Penguin later published the incomplete novel with in 2012 with the subtitle A Novel in Fragments . Unlike most manuscripts written or typewritten on larger paper, this one came in the form of 138 index cards. Penguin's published version recreated these cards in full-color reproductions including the smudges, scribbles, scrawlings, strikeouts, and annotations in English, French, and Russian. Perforated, one could tear the cards out of the book and reorganize in any way they saw fit or even potentially add their own cards to finish the novel that Nabokov couldn't. Taking a look at this might give you some ideas of how Nabokov worked and how you might adapt the style for yourself. Another interesting resource is this article with some photos/links about his method with respect to writing Lolita: https://www.openculture.com/2014/02/the-notecards-on-which-vladimir-nabokov-wrote-lolita.html

      You might also find some useful tidbits on his writing process (Bristol cards/Exacompta anyone?) in: Gold, Herbert. “Vladimir Nabokov, The Art of Fiction No. 40.” The Paris Review, 1967. https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/4310/the-art-of-fiction-no-40-vladimir-nabokov.

      Carl Mydans photographed Nabokov while writing in September 1958 and some of those may be interesting to you as well.

      Dustin Lance Black outlines his index card process in this video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vrvawtrRxsw

      If you dig around you'll also find Michael Ende and a variety of other German fiction writers who used index cards on the Zettelkasten page on Wikipedia, but I suspect most of the material on their processes are written in German.

      Index cards for fiction writing may allow some writers some useful affordances/benefits. By using small atomic pieces on note cards, one can be far more focused on the idea and words immediately at hand. It's also far easier in a creative and editorial process to move pieces around experimentally.

      Similarly, when facing Hemmingway's "White Bull", the size and space of an index card is fall smaller. This may have the effect that Twitter's short status updates have for writers who aren't faced with the seemingly insurmountable burden of writing a long blog post or essay in other software. They can write 280 characters and stop. Of if they feel motivated, they can continue on by adding to the prior parts of a growing thread.

      However, if you can, try to use a card catalog drawer with a rod so that you don't spill all of your well-ordered cards the way the character in Robert M. Pirsig's novel Lila (1991) did.

  7. Apr 2023
    1. “You throw it all away and invent from what you know. I should have said that sooner. That’s all there is to writing.”

      Ernest Hemingway

    2. Write as if you were a movie camera. Get exactly what is there. All human beings see with astonishing accuracy, not that they can necessarily write it down.”

      John Gardener

  8. Mar 2023
    1. When I looked it up in the OED (the Oxford English Dictionary), I discovered to my surprise that it wasn't even in the main volumes but had been added in the Supplement, because the first known written reference in English ("non-fictional wares") occurred in a library journal in 1903. That is to say, "nonfiction" was evidently a term coined by a librarian trying to decide how to label all the works of narrative prose in her collection that weren't fiction, and rather than call them, say, "fact," had thoughtlessly exiled them into the Slough of Non.

      According to the Oxford English dictionary, 'non-fiction' was coined in 1903 in a library journal by a librarian attempting to define the opposite of fiction.

    2. Why "Verity"?<br /> by Richard Rhodes

      Richard Rhodes uses the word verity rather than non-fiction as a means of defining his writing work in a more positive framing rather than defining it as the opposite of fiction (i.e. non-fiction).

    1. http://www.greaterbooks.com/verity.html

      This is a spectacular looking list of verity works over the last century. So many I've already read or which are already on my ever-growing list.

  9. Feb 2023
    1. Sloan, Robin. “Author’s Note.” Experimental fiction. Wordcraft Writers Workshop, November 2022. https://wordcraft-writers-workshop.appspot.com/stories/robin-sloan.

      brilliant!

    2. "I have affirmed the premise that the enemy can be so simple as a bundle of hate," said he. "What else? I have extinguished the light of a story utterly.

      How fitting that the amanuensis in a short story written with the help of artificial intelligence has done the opposite of what the author intended!

    1. Wordcraft shined the most as a brainstorming partner and source of inspiration. Writers found it particularly useful for coming up with novel ideas and elaborating on them. AI-powered creative tools seem particularly well suited to sparking creativity and addressing the dreaded writer's block.

      Just as using a text for writing generative annotations (having a conversation with a text) is a useful exercise for writers and thinkers, creative writers can stand to have similar textual creativity prompts.

      Compare Wordcraft affordances with tools like Nabokov's card index (zettelkasten) method, Twyla Tharp's boxes, MadLibs, cadavre exquis, et al.

      The key is to have some sort of creativity catalyst so that one isn't working in a vacuum or facing the dreaded blank page.

    1. Author's note by Robin Sloan<br /> November 2022

    2. Approaching this project, I felt committed to writing a story that could stand on its own; a story that achieved the same things I want ANY of my stories to achieve; a story to which the response might be not, “I see what you did there”, but: “I loved this!”

      "I see what you did there" as a genre of writing is interesting for its cleverness, but many authors will prefer readers to love their work instead of admiring their cleverness in one part.

  10. Dec 2022
  11. Nov 2022
    1. In late 2006, Eno released 77 Million Paintings, a program of generative video and music specifically for home computers. As its title suggests, there is a possible combination of 77 million paintings where the viewer will see different combinations of video slides prepared by Eno each time the program is launched. Likewise, the accompanying music is generated by the program so that it's almost certain the listener will never hear the same arrangement twice.

      Brian Eno's experiments in generative music mirror some of the ideas of generative and experimental fiction which had been in the zeitgeist and developing for a while.

      Certainly the fictional ideas were influential to the zeitgeist here, but the technology for doing these sorts of things in the musical realm lagged the ability to do them in the word realm.

      We're just starting to see some of these sorts of experimental things in the film space and with artificial intelligence they're becoming much easier to do in all of these media spaces.

      In some of the film spaces, they exist, but may tend to be short in nature, in part given the technology and processing power required.

      see also: Deepfake TikTok of Keanu Reeves which I've recently run across (algorithmically) on Instagram: https://www.dailydot.com/debug/unreal-keanu-reeves-ai-deepfake/

      Had anyone been working on generative art? Marcel Duchamp, et al? Some children's toys can mechanically create generative art which can be subtly modified by the children using axes of color, form, etc. Etch-a-sketch, kaleidoscopes, doodling robots (eg: https://www.amazon.com/4M-Doodling-Robot-Packaging-Vary/dp/B002EWWW9O).

    2. In the mid-1970s, he co-developed Oblique Strategies, a deck of cards featuring aphorisms intended to spur creative thinking.
  12. Oct 2022
    1. Given your talents, if you've not explored some of the experimental fiction side of things (like Mark Bernstein's hypertext fiction http://www.eastgate.com/catalog/Fiction.html, Robin Sloan's fish http://www.robinsloan.com/fish/ or Writing with the Machine https://www.robinsloan.com/notes/writing-with-the-machine/, or a variety of others https://hypothes.is/users/chrisaldrich?q=tag%3A%22experimental+fiction%22), perhaps it may be fun and allow you to use some of your technology based-background at the same time?

    1. level 1tristanjuricek · 4 hr. agoI’m not sure I see these products as anything more than a way for middle management to put some structure behind meetings, presentations, etc in a novel format. I’m not really sure this is what I’d consider a zettlecasten because there’s really no “net” here; no linking of information between cards. Just some different exercises.If you actually look at some of the cards, they read more like little cues to drive various processes forward: https://pipdecks.com/products/workshop-tactics?variant=39770920321113I’m pretty sure if you had 10 other people read those books and analyze them, they’d come up with 10 different observations on these topics of team management, presentation building, etc.

      Historically the vast majority of zettelkasten didn't have the sort of structure and design of Luhmann's, though with indexing they certainly create a network of notes and excerpts. These examples are just subsets or excerpts of someone's reading of these books and surely anyone else reading any book is going to have a unique set of notes on them. These sets were specifically honed and curated for a particular purpose.

      The interesting pattern here is that someone is selling a subset of their work/notes as a set of cards rather than as a book. Doing this allows different sorts of reading and uses than a "traditional" book would.

      I'm curious what other sort of experimental things people might come up with? The "novel" Cain's Jawbone, for example, could be considered a "Zettelkasten mystery" or "Zettelkasten puzzle". There's also the subset of cards from Roland Barthes' fichier boîte (French for zettelkasten), which was published posthumously as Mourning Diary.

  13. Sep 2022
    1. My first recommendation would be fiction. Reading fiction is important to understand the cross-sectional variation in humanity, to understand how difficult generalisations can be, to just get a sense of how different social pieces fit together, and to get a sense of different historical eras – and plus, reading fiction is often just plain flat-out fun.

      Why reading fiction is important

  14. Aug 2022
  15. Jul 2022
    1. https://www.zylstra.org/blog/2022/06/spring-83/

      I've been thinking about this sort of thing off and on myself.

      I too almost immediately thought of Fraidyc.at and its nudge at shifting the importance of content based on time and recency. I'd love to have a social reader with additional affordances for both this time shifting and Ton's idea of reading based on social distance.

      I'm struck by the seemingly related idea of @peterhagen's LindyLearn platform and annotations: https://annotations.lindylearn.io/new/ which focuses on taking some of the longer term interesting ideas as the basis for browsing and chewing on. Though even here, one needs some of the odd, the cutting edge, and the avant garde in their balanced internet diet. Would Spring '83 provide some of this?

      I'm also struck by some similarities this has with the idea of Derek Siver's /now page movement. I see some updating regularly while others have let it slip by the wayside. Still the "board" of users exists, though one must click through a sea of mostly smiling and welcoming faces to get to it the individual pieces of content. (The smiling faces are more inviting and personal than the cacophony of yelling and chaos I see in models for Spring '83.) This reminds me of Stanley Meyers' frequent assertion that he attempted to design a certain "sense of quiet" into the early television show Dragnet to balance the seeming loudness of the everyday as well as the noise of other contemporaneous television programming.

      The form reminds me a bit of the signature pages of one's high school year book. But here, instead of the goal being timeless scribbles, one has the opportunity to change the message over time. Does the potential commercialization of the form (you know it will happen in a VC world crazed with surveillance capitalism) follow the same trajectory of the old college paper facebook? Next up, Yearbook.com!

      Beyond the thing as a standard, I wondered what the actual form of Spring '83 adds to a broader conversation? What does it add to the diversity of voices that we don't already see in other spaces. How might it be abused? Would people come back to it regularly? What might be its emergent properties?

      It definitely seems quirky and fun in and old school web sort of way, but it also stresses me out looking at the zany busyness of some of the examples of magazine stands. The general form reminds me of the bargain bins at book stores which have the promise of finding valuable hidden gems and at an excellent price, but often the ideas and quality of what I find usually isn't worth the discounted price and the return on investment is rarely worth the effort. How might this get beyond these forms?

      It also brings up the idea of what other online forms we may have had with this same sort of raw experimentation? How might the internet have looked if there had been a bigger rise of the wiki before that of the blog? What would the world be like if Webmention had existed before social media rose to prominence? Did we somehow miss some interesting digital animals because the web rose so quickly to prominence without more early experimentation before its "Cambrian explosion"?

      I've been thinking about distilled note taking forms recently and what a network of atomic ideas on index cards look like and what emerges from them. What if the standard were digital index cards that linked and cross linked to each other, particularly in a world without adherence to time based orders and streams? What does a new story look like if I can pull out a card either at random or based on a single topic and only see it or perhaps some short linked chain of ideas (mine or others) which come along with it? Does the choice of a random "Markov monkey" change my thinking or perspective? What comes out of this jar of Pandora? Is it just a new form of cadavre exquis?

      This standard has been out for a bit and presumably folks are experimenting with it. What do the early results look like? How are they using it? Do they like it? Does it need more scale? What do small changes make to the overall form?


      For more on these related ideas, see: https://hypothes.is/search?q=tag%3A%22spring+%2783%22

  16. Jun 2022
    1. u/sscheper in writing your book, have you thought about the following alternative publishing idea which I'm transcribing from a random though I put on a card this morning?

      I find myself thinking about people publishing books in index card/zettelkasten formats. Perhaps Scott Scheper could do this with his antinet book presented in a traditional linear format, but done in index cards with his numbers, links, etc. as well as his actual cards for his index at the end so that readers could also see the power of the system by holding it in their hands and playing with it?

      It could be done roughly like Edward Powys Mathers' Cain's Jawbone or Henry Korn's Pontoon Manifesto? Perhaps numbered consecutively to make it easier to bring back into that format, but also done with your zk numbering so that people could order it and use it that way too? This way you get the book as well as a meta artifact of what the book is about as an example of how to do such a thing for yourself. Maybe even make a contest for a better ordering for the book than the one you published it in ?

      Link to: - https://hyp.is/6IBzkPfeEeyo9Suq-ZmCKg/www.scientificamerican.com/article/reading-paper-screens/

  17. May 2022
  18. Apr 2022
    1. In 1934, Marcel Duchamp announced the publication of his Green Box (edition of 320 copies) in a subscription bulletin — an enormous undertaking since each box contains 94 individual items mostly supposed “facsimiles” (Duchamp’s word) of notes first written between 1911 and 1915, each printed and torn upon templates to match the borders of the scribbled originals for a total of 30,080 scraps and pages.

      Marcel Duchamp announced his project the Green Box in 1934 as an edition of 320 copies of a box of 94 items. Most of the items were supposed "facsimiles" as described by Duchamp, of notes he wrote from 1911 to 1915.

      How is or isn't this like a zettelkasten or card index, admittedly a small collection?

    1. Having died in 1977, Nabokov never completed the book, and so all Penguin had to publish decades later came to, as the subtitle indicates, A Novel in Fragments. These “fragments” he wrote on 138 cards, and the book as published includes full-color reproductions that you can actually tear out and organize — and re-organize — for yourself, “complete with smudges, cross-outs, words scrawled out in Russian and French (he was trilingual) and annotated notes to himself about titles of chapters and key points he wants to make about his characters.”

      Vladimir Nabokov died in 1977 leaving an unfinished manuscript in note card form for the novel The Original of Laura. Penguin later published the incomplete novel with in 2012 with the subtitle A Novel in Fragments. Unlike most manuscripts written or typewritten on larger paper, this one came in the form of 138 index cards. Penguin's published version recreated these cards in full-color reproductions including the smudges, scribbles, scrawlings, strikeouts, and annotations in English, French, and Russian. Perforated, one could tear the cards out of the book and reorganize in any way they saw fit or even potentially add their own cards to finish the novel that Nabokov couldn't.


      Link to the idea behind Cain’s Jawbone by Edward Powys Mathers which had a different conceit, but a similar publishing form.

    1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Perec

      Georges Perec (born George Peretz) (French: [peʁɛk, pɛʁɛk];[1] 7 March 1936 – 3 March 1982) was a French novelist, filmmaker, documentalist, and essayist. He was a member of the Oulipo group. His father died as a soldier early in the Second World War and his mother was murdered in the Holocaust, and many of his works deal with absence, loss, and identity, often through word play.

    1. Interesting that there's no mention of L. Ron Hubbard's Mission Earth science fiction series that is a complete satire/send up of the psychiatry industry.

    2. The book was reviewed in all major magazines and newspapers, sparking what historian Ronald Kline has termed a “cybernetics craze,” becoming “a staple of science fiction and a fad among artists, musicians, and intellectuals in the 1950s and 1960s.”

      This same sort of craze also happened with Claude Shannon's The Mathematical Theory of Information which helped to bolster Weiner's take.

    1. Many famous antique texts are misunderstood and many others have been completely dismissed, all because the literary style in which they were written is unfamiliar today. So argues Mary Douglas in this controversial study of ring composition, a technique which places the meaning of a text in the middle, framed by a beginning and ending in parallel. To read a ring composition in the modern linear fashion is to misinterpret it, Douglas contends, and today’s scholars must reevaluate important antique texts from around the world.Found in the Bible and in writings from as far afield as Egypt, China, Indonesia, Greece, and Russia, ring composition is too widespread to have come from a single source. Does it perhaps derive from the way the brain works? What is its function in social contexts? The author examines ring composition, its principles and functions, in a cross-cultural way. She focuses on ring composition in Homer’s Iliad, the Bible’s book of Numbers, and, for a challenging modern example, Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy, developing a persuasive argument for reconstruing famous books and rereading neglected ones.

      Mary Douglas has a fascinating looking text on ring composition, a literary style which puts the meaning of the text in the middle and frames it with the beginning and end which are in parallel.

      Texts like the Bible, Homer, and even Tristram Shandy might be looked at from a different perspective with this lens.


      Suggested to me by Ann Bergin within the context of The Extended Mind

  19. Mar 2022
    1. Raymond Queneau’s 100,000,000,000,000 Poems, a collection of 10 14-line sonnets with each page cut into 14 strips to allow readers to arrange them into a astonishing number of variations; Padgett Powell’s The Interrogative Mood, a novel composed entirely of questions; and Geoff Ryman’s 253, which was originally published on the web in the form of a collection of hypertext links.
    2. One of those books was B.S. Johnson’s The Unfortunates, which Wildgust says he has used “to demonstrate how a ‘book’ can also be a box with unbound pages.” According to Wildgust, Johnson borrowed the idea from Turkish-born writer Marc Saporta’s 1962 experimental novel Composition No. I, which was printed as a collection of 150 unbound, single-sided pages that can be read in any order.

      Link this to Henry James Korn's experimental novel/cards in the early 1970s and late 1990s hypertext fiction.

  20. Feb 2022
    1. அண்மையில், The Tallest Story, Can the novel handle a subject as cataclysmic as climate change?  என்ற கட்டுரை படித்தேன். நான் உங்கள் தளத்தை தொடர்ந்து படித்து வருவதால் உங்கள் வாசகர்கள் விரும்பிப் படிப்பார்கள் என்று தோன்றியது. என்னுடைய மூலத்தை சற்று மாற்றிய சுமாரான தமிழ் வடிவம்:  வைகுண்டம் https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Climate_fiction வானிலைப்புனைவு – [cli-fi The Tallest Story] 

      Climate Fiction - Tallest story - JMo web article

  21. Jan 2022
    1. Books can indeed be dangerous. Until “Close Quarters,” I believed stories had the power to save me. That novel taught me that stories also had the power to destroy me. I was driven to become a writer because of the complex power of stories. They are not inert tools of pedagogy. They are mind-changing, world-changing.

      —Viet Thanh Nguyen

    1. unexpected change in weather conditions in the valley resulted in the aircraft flying into clouds that in turn caused the helicopter’s pilot to experience sudden spatial disorientation —a condition where the pilot loses the ability to correctly interpret aircraft attitude, altitude or airspeed in relation to the Earth or other points of reference— and made him fly into terrain.

      Spatial Disorientation

      • attitude
      • altitude
      • airspeed
    1. c’est de savoir jusqu’où est-ce que l’on interdit ? Or, nous sommes aujourd’hui peu capables d’évaluer ces interfaces parce que nous manquons d’outils de mesure

      Peut-etre qu'au lieu d'essayer d'interdire, l'Etat pourrait developper des outils standards pour respecter ses propres regulations.

      Par exemple, a publication du Rgpd, un bandeau de base aurait pu etre developpe et publie pour accompagner la reglementation.

      Cela permet aux entreprises qui n'ont pas besoin de plus de se mettre en regle facilement, et cela reduit le perimetre de controle : Il suffit de controler les sites qui n'ont pas un bandeau standard.

      Evidemment cela necessite de disposer de fonctionnaires dedies a la conception d'outil adapte a l'innovation reglementaire, dont l'un des objectifs est de proposer une une regulation compatible avec l'innovation, comme avec nos valeurs.

    2. une fonctionnalité qui remet en cause la transparence du service.

      Peut-etre meme faudrait-il chercher des patterns qui assurent la transparence du service ; personnaliser en fonction de l'habitus de chaque utilisateur. Un peu comme une mediation temps reelle sur la base du profile de la personne. "Ah tiens, c'est Gisele, 80 ans, myope comme une taupe. Le zoom est-il deja a 300% ? Sinon l'activer"

    1. moviepilot.de 5,8/10 IMDB 5,8/10 · 33K · Metascore: 77 Parents Guide

      In den Tiefen des Weltalls, weit entfernt von unserem Sonnensystem, leben Monte (Robert Pattinson) und seine kleine Tochter Willow (Jessie Ross) gemeinsam auf einem ramponierten Raumschiff, dessen Besatzung vor einiger Zeit noch aus vielen verurteilten Schwerverbrechern bestand, die sich mit einer gefährlichen Mission von ihren Strafen freikauften. Mit Experimenten wurden sie von der wahnsinnigen Reproduktionswissenschaftlerin Dibs (Juliette Binoche) gequält, bei denen bis auf Monte und Willow alle ums Leben kamen. Monte ist ein stiller Mann, der sich eine harte Selbstdisziplin auferlegt hat. Doch wenn er mit seiner Tochter zusammen ist, wird aus ihm ein zärtlicher Versorger. Nun sind die beiden die letzten Überlebenden der Crew und nähern sich in völliger Isolation ihrem letzten unausweichlichen Ziel: einem schwarzen Loch und damit auch dem Ende von Zeit und Raum. filmstarts.de

      „High Life“ ist ein schmerzhafter Film, doch es lohnt sich, die Expedition ins Nichts zu begleiten. Wer ein klassisches Weltraum-Epos erleben will, der bleibt besser auf dem Boden. Claire Denis‘ Vision ist kompromisslos und radikal. Ein einzigartiges, schwarzes Juwel. filmstarts.de 4,5/5

      In „High Life“ nimmt uns die französische Arthouse-Regisseurin Claire Denis mit ins Weltall. Von Zivilisation ist da oben aber nichts zu spüren. Stattdessen gibt es eine zwischen Wahnsinn und Klaustrophobie schwankende Stimmung, die nach und nach zwischenmenschliche Abgründe freilegt, während das Publikum vergebens auf Erlösung, Hoffnung oder eine tatsächliche Handlung wartet. Oliver Armknecht 8/10

      An Bord eines Raumschiffes werden übergriffige Experimente durchgeführt, die die Überlebenden vor komplizierte Fragen stellen und dem Publikum schwer zu denken geben. Claire Denis erobert mit ihrem ungewöhnlichen Vertreter eines traditionsreichen Genres reizvolles Neuland. epdFilm ?/10

    1. உலக சிந்தனை வரலாற்றை எடுத்துப் பார்த்தால் இதுவரையில் எழுதப்பட்டு தலைமுறை தலைமுறையாக கைமாற்றப்பட்டு நீடிக்கும் பெரும்பாலான படைப்புகள் புனைவுகளே.

      Fiction transcends plentitude of generations

    1. TMDB (74%) JustWatch (81%) filmstarts.de (–/5) moviepilot.de (6,6/10) IMDB (6,8/10 · 5,4K)

      In naher Zukunft: Cameron (Mahershala Ali) ist todkrank. Dem fürsorglichen Ehemann und Vater wird von seiner Ärztin (Glenn Close) ein Weg aufgezeigt, wie er seine Familie vor dem bevorstehenden Leid bewahrt: Er soll sich durch einen Klon ersetzen lassen, der wie eine Abbild seiner selbst aussieht. Während Cameron mit der Frage konfrontiert wird, ob er das Schicksal seiner Familie ändern soll oder nicht, lernt er immer mehr Wahrheiten über das Leben, den Verlust und die Liebe, als er sich jemals vorgestellt hätte. Cameron erkennt daraufhin immer mehr, was bedeutet, Opfer zu bringen und wie weit ein Mensch in der Lage ist zu gehen, um seinen Liebsten ein glücklicheres, besseres Leben zu ermöglichen... filmstarts.de

      „Schwanengesang“ handelt von Klonen todkranker Menschen, welche den Platz ihrer Originale einnehmen sollen, damit die ahnungslose Familie nicht leiden muss. Das überwiegend ruhig erzählte und schön bebilderte Science-Fiction-Drama stellt existenzielle Fragen zu Identität, aber auch moralische, welchen Preis das Glück haben darf. Das richtet sich vor allem an ein Publikum, das gerne nachdenkt, bietet aber ebenfalls emotionale Momente, die auf das Konto von Mahershala Ali gehen. Oliver Armknecht 7,5/10

  22. Dec 2021
    1. Crafting characters with believable faults, clear motivations and fleshed-out backstories is integral to holding a reader’s interest throughout the length of a narrative.
    1. As well as enhancing the reader’s experience, a map is a simple tool for a writer to use when planning, writing and editing their story. It’s a great world-building tool, helping you get a basic grasp of your world’s geography and how its environments can affect characters and their journeys. You can keep your map beside you as a reference while you plan your character’s journey and the obstacles or challenges they may encounter. Having a visual aid like this can help you keep ideas together in one focused area, rather than having to search through a mountain of notes.
      • [[Venmurasu MOC]]
      • I can build fictional india map for venmurasu using cartography3d software and [[🔌 obsidian leaflet plugin]] obsidian://show-plugin?id=obsidian-leaflet-plugin
    1. You can’t show up on Meru and start up the thing unless you have years and years of experience. Climbing and spending time on the mountains is really the only way you can train

      Mount Meru

      • known as shark's fin
    1. city of Arequipa has a significant number of buildings constructed with sillar, resulting in the nickname la ciudad blanca ("the white city").[5]
      • legal capital of Peru
      • Misti stratovolcano
      • my fictitious city like tiruvannamalai will have white buildings made with sillar
    1. Good history comes from a combination of sources: in this case, private papers ranging from Lord Curzon’s letters to the diary of a royal tutor; from archival records in Delhi and London, not to speak of parliamentary papers; art, and not just paintings by Ravi Varma, to understand how princes projected themselves; newspaper records, which contain debates and ‘live’ commentary; scholarly material on connected themes; and, of course, anecdotal information from biographies and memoirs, which add texture.

      sources for Anecdotal writing to history fiction

  23. Nov 2021
  24. Oct 2021
    1. சமணர்கள் இப்பிரபஞ்சம், இந்த பூமி, தேவர்கள், தெய்வங்கள், உயிர்க்குலங்கள், மனிதர்கள் ஆகியவற்றை பல்வேறு வளையங்களாக உருவகிக்கிறார்கள். அதன் மையம் மேரு என்னும் பொன்மலை. அங்கே ஆதிநாதர் அமர்ந்திருக்கிறார்.
      • info about jainism philosophy on universe
      • my fiction work Meru notes
  25. imaginaxiom.com imaginaxiom.com
    1. However, we know that money is a fiction, a story that we tell ourselves. Money is a story about what and who has value. This scale of human value that we call money is fake. But if enough people believe it, that idea of money becomes our reality.

      On the Media

      The Story of Money

      Full Faith & Credit

      In this hour, On the Media looks at the story of money, from its uncertain origins to its digital reinvention in the form of cryptocurrency.

    1. An organization of designers collectively advocating for the ethical practice of design and for the bargaining power of employees, freelancers, and educators against the commoditization of design by corporate and capitalist value extraction that is actively undermining the flourishing of humans for the sake of monopolizing social communication through advertising and marketing and the accumulation of profits for the benefit of a select few at the top of the corporate hierarchies.

      I am curious to read The Ministry for the Future by Kim Stanley Robinson as recommended by Raphaelle Moatti in the Design Science Studio coheART2.

    1. If I could get policymakers, and citizens, everywhere to read just one book this year, it would be Kim Stanley Robinson’s The Ministry for the Future.

      Quoted on the Amazon product page for the book, The Ministry for the Future by Kim Stanley Robinson.

      The book was recommended by Raphaelle Moatti in the Design Science Studio coheART2.

  26. www.hylo.com www.hylo.com
    1. Ministry for the Future

      The Amazon product page for the book, Ministry for the Future, quotes Ezra Klein.

      If I could get policymakers, and citizens, everywhere to read just one book this year, it would be Kim Stanley Robinson’s The Ministry for the Future.

  27. Sep 2021
  28. Jul 2021
    1. Павел Чжан – талантливый программист крупной китайской компании в Москве. Бывший детдомовец, он упорно идёт к цели: перебраться из стремительно колонизирующейся России в метрополию, Китай, – и не испытывает угрызений совести, даже когда узнаёт, что его новый проект лежит в основе будущей государственной чипизации людей. Но однажды, во время волонтёрской поездки в детдом, Чжан встречает человека, который много лет назад сломал ему жизнь – и избежал наказания. Воспоминания пробуждают в Павле тьму, которой он и сам боится…
    1. Feel free to play hopscotch

      This idea of playing hopscotch#%22Table_of_Instructions%22_and_structure) through a text reminds me of some mathematics texts I've come across where the author draws out a diagram of potential readings and which portions are prerequisites so that professors using the book might pick and choose chapters to skip in their presentations.

      Also reminiscent of the Choose Your Own Adventure books from childhood too.

      cross reference: [[John Barth]], [[Henry James Korn]] and [[experimental fiction]], and [[hypertext]]

  29. Jun 2021
  30. Apr 2021
  31. Mar 2021
  32. Feb 2021
  33. Jan 2021
    1. https://outline.com/tan7Ej

      Why Do People love Kungfustory?

      It’s well-established among the original novel/translating community that Kungfustory.com is the best.

      Kungfustory.com is just a place where Kungfustory can be hosted. It’s very user-friendly for readers, with a superb app that functions very well and reliably on phones. It’s easy to compile a list of reads, to know when those reads have been recently updated, and to follow along your favorite story.

      Select any genre you like: romance, stories with reborn heroes, magical realism, eastern fantasy the world of wuxia, horror stories, romantic love novels, fanfiction, sci-fi.

      New chapters added daily, Never be bored with new addictive plots and new worlds.

      https://www.kungfustory.com/

    1. Why Do People love Kungfustory?

      It’s well-established among the original novel/translating community that Kungfustory.com is the best.

      Kungfustory.com is just a place where Kungfustory can be hosted. It’s very user-friendly for readers, with a superb app that functions very well and reliably on phones. It’s easy to compile a list of reads, to know when those reads have been recently updated, and to follow along your favorite story.

      Select any genre you like: romance, stories with reborn heroes, magical realism, eastern fantasy the world of wuxia, horror stories, romantic love novels, fanfiction, sci-fi.

      New chapters added daily, Never be bored with new addictive plots and new worlds.

      https://www.kungfustory.com/

  34. Dec 2020
    1. In the right hour, the woodland springtime metamorphic processes of the neighboring Lake Geneva suburb’s in-betweens were in a paused state – the toads again hushed; the crickets tired, and the human populace, too. In the right hour, the fickle wind and the social owls were the only sound, and nothing moved but the sparse, light-footed doe in careful segments with her fawn.

      Distinctly the best sentence I've ever written.

  35. Nov 2020
  36. Oct 2020
    1. and narratives in fiction, popular nonfiction, and marketing material. These texts shape the public’s knowledge about and potential engagement with transoce-anic networks.

      on peut se demander si la littérature (+cinéma etc.) ne se dédouane pas de sa responsabilité vis-à-vis de ses effets sur l’imaginaire collectif – une question qui mérite assurément d’être réinvestie à l’ère des fake news – puisqu’elle façonne en partie la représentation que le public se fait sur un sujet.

      on reprochera par exemple aux films historiques (mettant en scène un musicien dont les gestes ne correspondent pas à ce qui est joué, une athlète de haut niveau qui reproduit pauvrement la technique de course, un film d’époque avec des écriteaux dans une police de caractères inventée en 2000…) de véhiculer des absurdités collatérales à leur réalisation mal informée.

    1. While many people say that such and such a book changed their lives, you can be sure that they could not tell you who published the book. The identification is with the book and its author, not the publisher.
    2. Academics will probably bristle at this thought but, at least in relation to literature, all you have to do is look at the courses that are offered featuring the literatures of other countries. Not only don’t they teach these literatures, they don’t read them.

      We certainly could use an Anthony Bourdain of literature to help peel back the curtain on other countries and cultures.

    1. Fifty-Two Stories Hardcover – Deckle Edge, April 14, 2020 by Anton Chekhov (Author), Richard Pevear (Translator), Larissa Volokhonsky (Translator)
  37. Sep 2020
    1. Circe by Madeline MillerThis magnificent story of the famous witch goddess from Homer’s Odyssey was shortlisted for the 2019 Women’s prize for fiction. It is both hugely enjoyable, showing the very male classical epic from a female point of view, and profoundly affecting in its depictions of the trials of immortality. This book is the closest you can get to experiencing what it might really be like to be a goddess, with all its benefits and sacrifices.
  38. Dec 2019
    1. C’est que je venais de faire une cuisante découverte : cette belle histoire qui était ma vie, elle devenait fausse au fur et à mesure que je me la racontais.

      Le passage est en écho à celui-ci (p. 222) :

      Ma vie serait une belle histoire qui <mark>deviendrait vraie au fur et à mesure que je me la raconterais</mark>.

      Oups! Beauvoir se rend compte (avec lucidité, en rétrospective) de la fiction qu’elle écrivait!

  39. Nov 2019
    1. p. 121 :

      Je précisais, pour plus de vraisemblance, que je ne parlerais pas le lundi suivant à Alvaro, mais le jeudi : au cours du petit dîner qui couronne d’habitude toutes les réunions du club des Écrivains (<mark>ces dîners n’existent pas, mais il est irréfutable que les réunions ont lieu le jeudi</mark>, fait que Carlos Argentino Daneri pouvait vérifier dans les journaux et qui donnait à la phrase une allure de vérité).

      Borges s’amuse souvent avec la fiction, à inventer des passages hyperboliques complètement farfelus (et qui ne sont pourtant pas si inutiles – on n’a qu’à se tourner vers la réalité pour se rendre compte de la lucidité de cette invention). 🙃