1,074 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Laminate flooring/Vinyl flooringFive to ten yearsHardwood flooringFifteen to fifty years

      Refurb cost

    2. CarpetsLow quality – two to four yearsMedium quality – five to eight yearsTop quality – eight to fifteen years

      Carpets

    3. ree to five years l The gauge is approximate and assumes an averagesize property with average use.l The lifespan of decoration to a property will dependupon the size of the rooms and areas involved.Allowance must also be made for the type andnumber of permitted occupants and whether theproperty was furnished or unfurnished.l Walls, partitions and internal painted surfaces arelikely to suffer more stress in higher footfall areas ofthe property.l Where these factors point to an inevitable (greater)need for redecoration at the end of the tenancy,an adjudicator may consider more than a simplecontribution to the cost of redecoration from thetenant to be unreasonable

      refurb

    1. Basic facelift (redecoration)£2,000£3,000£2,500 Basic refurbishment - (incl. new kitchen, painting, new flooring, joinery work, modifying bathroom)£15,000£18,000£16,500 Full refurbishment (incl.all of the above, plus new bathroom, new boiler and radiators, structural work, new electrics, re-plastering)£33,000£48,000£40,500

      Refurb cost

    1. We recommend that landlords refurbish their rental properties every 5 years. But this doesn’t have to result in spending a small fortune, nor does it mean that you need to spend the next couple of months with a paintbrush in hand.
    1. That said, most kitchens in rental properties will last around 10 years before needing a full refurbishment. It's important to remember that .

      10 years

  2. Nov 2022
    1. Die Hitzewellen dieses Sommers haben zu 6% Übersterblichkeit und zu vermutlich über 10.000 Toten in Frankreich geführt. In Großbritannien sind etwa 3000, in Spanien 4000 Menschen der Hitze zum Opfer gefallen.Wenn die Temperatur 2100 um 3• über der vorindustriellen Zeit, werden in Europa jährlich bis zu 90.000 Menschen an direkten Folgen der Hitze sterben.

    1. Dr. Miho Ohsaki re-examined workshe and her group had previously published and confirmed that the results are indeed meaningless in the sensedescribed in this work (Ohsaki et al., 2002). She has subsequently been able to redefine the clustering subroutine inher work to allow more meaningful pattern discovery (Ohsaki et al., 2003)

      Look into what Dr. Miho Ohsaki changed about the clustering subroutine in her work and how it allowed for "more meaningful pattern discovery"

    2. http://www.cs.ucr.edu/~eamonn/meaningless.pdf Paper that argues cluster time series subsequences is "meaningless". tl;dr: radically different distributions end up converging to translations of basic sine or trig functions. Wonder if constructing a simplicial complex does anything?

      Note that one researcher changed the algorithm to produce potentially meaningful results

    1. And yes: that’s certainly how a lot of capitalist cultures think about time — as something that can be wasted or optimized. It’s often predicated on the idea that you should be focused on doing one thing, and one thing only, very efficiently: time is money, etc. etc. But that itself, sometimes referred to as a “monochronic” understanding of time, is no more or less “natural” than other ways of conceiving of time, like “polychronic” culture, which understands time as dynamic, flexible, and filled with several tasks at once, each of which will take the time that they need. Monochronic cultures may be more “efficient” in their use of time, but in their treatment of time as a commodity, they lose the richness that comes with allowing tasks, conversations, and interactions to move forward at a more natural and sustainable pace.

      Monochronic: the Greek ‘Chronos’ Polychronic: the Greek ‘Kairos’

    1. Use the Pomodoro technique

      Or better: time boxing, adopting the length of your time boxes to your level of energy and motivation.

    1. Because Autofocus doesn’t rely on dates, it’s essential to combine it with a calendar system so you can account for time-sensitive tasks like appointments and turning in forms at certain deadlines.

      No system is perfect

    1. Now, I know people get concerned. They say, “Well, I might be injecting too much structure into my life and this is going to make my work life more rigid and I’ll be less creative.” I call nonsense on all of that. Just because you’re in control of everything doesn’t mean you need to schedule every seven minutes of your time like a crazy person.

      It is important to find the right granularity of your planning. Too small time block and you'll have an unrealistic plan, too large blocks and they don't help you prioritise.

    2. You’re giving your time a job as opposed to asking in the moment, “What should I do next?”

      A lot like budgeting money in YNAB: «every dollar has a job».

      However, Cal doesn't mention the tension between having a rigid schedule and being flexible by deciding at the moment.

    3. Now, everyone who works has some sort of time management system they’re using. If you don’t know what it’s called, if you can’t tell me the details of it, if you’ve never thought about that, it’s just a really bad one probably, but you still have one. One way or the other, you’re making these decisions. The question is just how do we want to make these decisions? What is going to work better?

      Everybody already has a systems that is, more or less, working properly.

      So there is no need to throw it all out of the window to start over.

    4. I’m going to define time management to be whatever philosophy, process, systems, or rules that you deploy to make decisions about what you’re going to do right now with your time.
    1. That’s not to mention the Stock-Sanford corollary to Parkinson’s law: “If you wait until the last minute, it only takes a minute to do.”
    1. Die letzten Zahlen des Global Carbon Project ergeben: Die Verbrennung von Kohle, Gas und Öl nimmt zu. 2022 werden ca. 36,6 Gigatonnen CO2-Äquivalente emittiert. Allein mehr Pflanzungen neuer Bäume halten die Höhe der Gesamtemissionen seit 2015 stabil. Die Pariser Ziele sind so unerreichbar. https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2022/nov/10/carbon-emissions-from-fossil-fuels-will-hit-record-high-in-2022-climate-crisis Carbon Budget 2022: https://www.globalcarbonproject.org/carbonbudget/index.htm

    1. Videobericht über das Austrocknen des Irak und seine katastrophalen Folgen für die lokale Bevölkerung, vor allem im Süden und in Kurdistan. Hinweise auf die Ursachen: auf der globalen Erhitzung auch die Staudämme in den Nachbarstaaten.

    1. Unfortunately most init systems don't do this correctly within Docker since they're built for hardware shutdowns instead. This causes processes to be hard killed with SIGKILL, which doesn't give them a chance to correctly deinitialize things.
    1. the container ship was simply becoming so large so unwieldy that much of the infrastructure around them is struggling to cope a lot of the decisions to build Supply chains were really based on

      Impact of cheap transportation

      production costs and transport costs

      With transportation costs so low and logistics assumed, manufactures chased cheaper production costs. They would outsource manufacturing to low-cost countries without considering the complexity risks.

  3. Oct 2022
    1. First and foremost, we need to acknowledge that even though the funding goal has been met–it does not meet the realistic costs of the project. Bluntly speaking, we did not have the confidence to showcase the real goal of ~1.5 million euros (which would be around 10k backers) in a crowdfunding world where “Funded in XY minutes!” is a regular highlight.

      new tag: pressure to understate the real cost/estimate

  4. Sep 2022
    1. Some people eventually realize that the code quality is important, but they lack of the time to do it. This is the typical situation when you work under pressure or time constrains. It is hard to explain to you boss that you need another week to prepare your code when it is “already working”. So you ship the code anyway because you can not afford to spent one week more.
    1. • Daily writing prevents writer’s block.• Daily writing demystifies the writing process.• Daily writing keeps your research always at the top of your mind.• Daily writing generates new ideas.• Daily writing stimulates creativity• Daily writing adds up incrementally.• Daily writing helps you figure out what you want to say.

      What specifically does she define "writing" to be? What exactly is she writing, and how much? What does her process look like?

      One might also consider the idea of active reading and writing notes. I may not "write" daily in the way she means, but my note writing, is cumulative and beneficial in the ways she describes in her list. I might further posit that the amount of work/effort it takes me to do my writing is far more fruitful and productive than her writing.

      When I say writing, I mean focused note taking (either excerpting, rephrasing, or original small ideas which can be stitched together later). I don't think this is her same definition.

      I'm curious how her process of writing generates new ideas and creativity specifically?


      One might analogize the idea of active reading with a pen in hand as a sort of Einsteinian space-time. Many view reading and writing as to separate and distinct practices. What if they're melded together the way Einstein reconceptualized the space time continuum? The writing advice provided by those who write about commonplace books, zettelkasten, and general note taking combines an active reading practice with a focused writing practice that moves one toward not only more output, but higher quality output without the deleterious effects seen in other methods.

    1. Evidence [28] and theory [29] support the assertion that cultural evolution is more rapid than genetic evolution [27,28,30,31], even when measured on comparable scales [30,31]. One simple reason for this difference is that the ‘generation time’, G, of cultural transmission can be orders of magnitude shorter than that of genetic transmission [30]. In humans, the average time between the birth of parents and the birth of their offspring, genetic G, ranges from roughly 2 to 3 decades, while cultural G, the average time between learning a piece of information and transmitting it, ranges from seconds to decades. Thus, it is reasonable to presume that cultural inheritance may provide greater adaptive capacity than genetic inheritance.

      !- definition : Generation time - generation time of genetic transmission in range of 2 to 3 decades while for cultural transmission can vary from seconds to decades.

    1. It's possible to deny the existence of something while using it all the time. Julian Barbour doesn't believe time is real, but he is perfectly capable of showing up to a meeting on time.

      This is the difference between a social construct and a distinct physical phenomenon. In this regard, “time” is like “race”.

  5. Aug 2022
    1. ```js const today = new Date(); today.setUTCHours(0,0,0,0); console.log("Today: ", today);

      const yesterday = new Date(); yesterday.setDate(yesterday.getDate() - 1); yesterday.setUTCHours(0,0,0,0); console.log("Yesterday: ", yesterday); ```

    1. ```js // Time of writing article = 14th January, 2022

      // ✅ Set date to Nearest Midnight in the Past const d1 = new Date(); d1.setHours(0, 0, 0, 0);

      console.log(d1); // Fri Jan 14 2022 00:00:00

      // ✅ Set date to Nearest Midnight in the future const d2 = new Date(); d2.setHours(24, 0, 0, 0);

      console.log(d2); // Sat Jan 15 2022 00:00:00 ```

    1. 1% when it comes to time — it’s only 15 minutes out of your day

      it's about 1% of a day, not a person's perceived day.

    1. Reportage über einen besonders verheerenden Waldbrand in Alaska, viele Hintergrundinformationen über Waldbrände in arktischen Regionen. Zeigt den multiplen Charakter der durch die Erhitzung ausgelösten Krise eines Ökosystems.

    1. Ausführlicher Überblick zu den erwarteten Klimaveränderungen auf kroatischem Staatsgebiet bis 2040, mit einem Ausblick auf 2070. Berücksichtigt vor allem RCP4.5, aber auch RCP8.5. Macht (bei sehr oberflächlichem Durchsehen mit mangelnden Sprachkenntnissen) an manchen Stellen einen etwas verharmlosenden Eindruck.

    1. As humans lower their time preference, they develop a scope for carrying out tasks over longer time horizons. Instead of spending all our time producing goods for immediate consumption, we can choose to spend time creating superior goods that take longer to complete but benefit us more in the long run. Only by lowering time preference can humans produce goods that are not meant to be consumed themselves but are instead used in the production of other goods.

      Only when humans are able to lower their time preference are they able to focus on producing goods that benefit them in the long term, rather than those that are meant for immediate consumption.

  6. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. 1814

      This is the only Austen novel (I think! please correct me) set in a definite stated time. It's because there's a lull in the war which readers know will impact the Navy after the events of the novel conclude. (Do check out Synchronous *Emma* a project tracking the events of the novel in real time)

    1. erweil fährt die BASF-Tochter Wintershall Dea durch die Förderung von Öl in Westsibirien im Verbund mit dem russischen Staatskonzern Gazprom Millionengewinne ein, wie einem Betrag des TV-Magazins „Monitor“ von vergangener Woche zu entnehmen war.
  7. Jul 2022
    1. Die Wagner-Privatarmee sorgt dafür, dass mehr Migranten aus Libyen nach Italien kommen und damit die Wahlchancen der Rechten vergrößern.. Der Artikel geht aber auch auf die Öl-Interessen in Libyen ein, wo sich die Bürgerkriegs Parteien zum ersten Mal annähern und die Produktion steigern.

    1. let me make a few comments if i may about time from nagarjuna's perspective there is no 01:25:52 time i don't think i can be more brief and how does he support that he says well when you're in the present moment there's no past and there's no future 01:26:06 if you dissect the present moment even to a more granular present moment some of that's going to be passed some of that's going to be yet to come and then you have even a finer more 01:26:18 granular present moment if you keep going on with that granularity you end up having no time you have no past no future and no presence so that's kind of in a nutshell some of the arguments or 01:26:32 logic that knock arjuna nagarjuna uses to establish no time now of course what he means is there's no absolute time there's no time on a some there's no essence of time um there is you know 01:26:46 time from the perspective of of of conventionality um cause and effect is reciprocal so when we have a cause we have an effect or we know there's 01:26:59 going to be an effect but also from the point of view of the effect the result we know that there must have been a cause so this reciprocality is something unique to the highest 01:27:10 school of prasannika majamaka uh within the fourth highest school of majamaca i just wanted to mention that to to round out one of our previous discussions

      Barry points out Nagarjuna's analysis of time leads to the conclusion that there is no absolute present, past or future.

      It is difficult to fathom the full import of what this means. If time exists conventionally but not absolutely, what are the implications of this?

      Also, there are Buddhist arguments that hold that there is no causality because A and B are different, how could A ever cause B? This has not been discussed here yet.

    2. i was particularly struck by the fact that barry didn't say the mind is this this and that okay barry said well the mind is many things 01:19:18 uh look there's this and this this and this and there's a sort of layers also in some sense in which we can talk about it or or have some understanding partial media 01:19:30 understanding about it some wisdom about it and this layering i find it it's uh absolutely brilliant from my perspective 01:19:43 uh because it it dissolves the wrong question which is what is the mind period what is the thing which is the mind here is the thing which is mine uh let's just 01:19:55 define it characterize it and understand what it is that's a wrong that's a wrong way of thinking about it it's when we say when we think about our mind of course we think something you you unite somehow 01:20:09 it's the set of processes that happen into me and it's about my thinking my emotions but it's not one thing it's a complicated layer there's many layers of discussion possible about 01:20:21 that i don't want to enter into the specific but i found this fascinating and let me go to time immediately because uh it's it's deeply related i got the book of time which is a um 01:20:34 the audio of time in which i carlo this carlo is very timely because we're also kind of running low on time absolutely absolutely 01:20:46 and and and in the book i sort of uh try to collect everything we have learned about time from science from special activity from generative statistical mechanics from other pieces and and what we 01:21:00 tentatively uh learn about time with quantum gravity which is my uh specific field once again you have to sort of uh put your hands on the notion of time and the main message of the book 01:21:12 in fact the single message of the book is that the question of what is time is a wrong question because when we think about time we think about the single thing okay we think we have a totally clear idea about time time is a single thing 01:21:25 that flows from the past to the future and the past influence the president the president of the future in the present this is how things are the reality of the present entire universe is a real state in that and we learn from science that this way 01:21:37 of viewing times is wrong it's factually wrong okay it's not true that uh we all proceed in in in together from 01:21:48 moment a to moment b and the amount lapse amount of time lapses between a and b is the same for everybody and so on and forth because we learned from from experiences especially activity generativity statistical mechanics and 01:22:01 other things so the way to think about time is that it's a very layered thing but with this thing we call time is made by layers um conceptually and when we look at larger 01:22:14 domain the one of our usual experience some layers are lost so uh some aspects some some properties of what we call time are only good 01:22:25 uh are only appropriate for describing the temporal experience we have if we don't move too fast it doesn't look too uh to to to too far away if you don't look at the atoms too in detail as a single 01:22:38 degrees of freedom and so on so forth so the notion of time opens up in a in a in a set of layers which are become increasingly 01:22:53 uh general only if you go down to the bottom level um some aspect of time like the universality of time uh uh only makes sense if if we don't go too 01:23:06 fast velocities for instance um so this is a similarity and that's why the the opening up of what the mind is into layers seems to be uh 01:23:19 the right direction to go right when if if i ask uh does a cat has a mind or does a fly has a mind it seems to me that the only answer is uh to get out of the idea that the 01:23:31 answer is either yes or no i mean i i suppose that certainly a cat has a certain you know a sleepy feeling in the morning and the moment of 01:23:43 joy when he sees his fellow cats but i suppose a cat doesn't go through a complicated intellectual game of trying to understanding what is reality and debating about that so there is some aspect in common uh either not break up 01:23:56 this this notion in in pieces once again uh i mean the the topic is what is real uh 01:24:08 if we start by saying time is real it's a beautiful chapter why you cannot say that time is an intrinsic existence uh we just get it wrong if we think well then atoms are real or the mind is real 01:24:21 all these answers we got it wrong we can say that things are real in a uh in a conventional sense within a context within a within a um 01:24:37 and and then we when we try to realize what you mean by uh something is real this is certainly real in a conventional sense but we realize that um reality the reality of this object 01:24:49 itself it gets sort of broken up into interdependence between this object and else and its different layers 01:25:02 and and that's the reality that as a scientist i can deal with not the ultimate reality the the conventional reality of course conventional reality is real as uh perry 01:25:15 was saying this is not a negation of reality uh it's a it's a it it's a freedom from the idea of the ultimate reality uh 01:25:27 the ultimate uh sort of intrinsic inherent reality being there on which in terms of which building progress

      Carlo resonates with Barry's layered explanation of mind from the Buddhist perspective. The mind is not some simplistic entity. Carlo wrote a book on time and he applied this same layered thinking. Time is different in different circumstances. It acts one way at the quantum level, another at the microscopic, another at our human level, and another at the galactic level.

      In a sense, we tend to make the same type of category errors whether it is our experience of time, space or experience in general. We overgeneralize from an anthropomorphic perspective. A large part of Jay L. Garfield's argument of cognitive illusions and immediacy of experience rests on this fact.

      https://hyp.is/go?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdocdrop.org%2Fvideo%2FHRuOEfnqV6g%2F&group=world

      Opaque mechanisms operate in both our sense organs and our mental machinery to give us this illusory feeling of immediacy of the sensed or cognized object.

      Uexkull's umwelt experiments on the snail as explained by Cummins are consistent with Carlo's perspective on time.

      https://hyp.is/go?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdocdrop.org%2Fvideo%2FG_0jJfliUvQ%2F&group=world

    1. he's built a little toy he's built a treadmill for a snail isn't that wonderful he's a genuine scientist he's doing lots and lots of experiments with 00:11:27 animals they're very creative experiments in this case he's built a treadmill for a snail so the snail is held by a vice on a rotating ball and the snail is then um approached by 00:11:40 the investigator who chucks it under the chin like this and if you chuck the snail under the chin like this the snail will recoil not surprising i 00:11:52 would recall it as well but as you speed up the frequency of these chucks under the chin at about five hertz once you pass a frequency of about five chucks per second 00:12:05 the snail's behavior changes remarkably instead of being perturbed and trying to withdraw it tries to crawl onto onto something the qualitative nature of what's happening 00:12:18 to the snail has changed for the snail and its response or it's it's um sense making is altered and it's tried it perceives seems to perceive now a constant surface onto which it might 00:12:32 crawl now that might seem strange to you but i'll remind you that if we flash a light for you five times a second you'll see a light flashing and if we speed up the interval 00:12:44 then we shorten the interval between flashes to make them faster there comes a critical point at about 20 site flashes per second where you no longer perceive individual flashes but you 00:12:54 perceive a continuous light something like this underlies the magic that happens with moving pictures as well where you know that the action you see in the cinema is a bunch of projected still pictures 00:13:09 but they um have this character of continuous movement for you likewise in sound if we play that for you you hear a bunch of disconnected claps but if we shorten the 00:13:22 interval between the claps and speed it up there comes a point at which it changes into a continuous low pitch and that happens again about 20 hertz at about 20 cycles per second now for this snail 00:13:35 that border is at a different place it's at about five cycles per second what this shows is quite profound remember kant's synthetic a prioris 00:13:46 time for this snail is different than time for you the time that arises as a function of the body of the snail has this border at about five hertz where you have one at about 20 hertz 00:14:01 his basic insight is that worlds arise for snails that are not commensurable with worlds that arise for humans with which are not commensurable with worlds that arise for earthworms 00:14:15 the notion of an umvelt we get to determine a minute is used to describe this bodily specific arising of a world together with time and space 00:14:28 now i said it's rather weird to think of time being fundamentally different for an animal of a different constitution but i'll remind you that we can use our cinematic tricks to make ourselves aware of our own 00:14:41 limitations on the left there through high-speed photography we managed to make perceptible an event which we cannot otherwise see the event that you see there with the splash is 00:14:53 perfectly real but we can only make it manifest through high-speed photography similarly whoops there are processes going on around us 00:15:05 that we do not perceive and we can use time-lapse photography to make those to speed them up so that they become perceptible to us something like the blooming of a flower or the battles intricate battles fought 00:15:16 between brambles and hedges these make us aware that we perceive time as unfolding at a rate dictated by our own metabolism and bodily processes so this idea that time and space 00:15:32 are considered very different from count but very much tied now to the body this is quite radical

      Here, the speaker, Fred Cummins, introduces us tto the synthetic apriori concepts of time explored by Uexkull.in his clever snail experiment.

      By holding the snail in place on a rotating vertical wheel and stimulating the neck of the snail by touch, by speeding up the frequency of touching the snail to about 5 Hz, Uexkull was able to produce a different behavior in the snail. The snail was no longer withdrawing its neck into its shell, but tries to walk instead.

      Cummins compares this unique sensing of time unique to the snail with that of humans. We perceive individual sounds and individual images as distinct as long as they occur at a frequency below approximately 20 Hz. When the frequency rises above this, we perceive it as continuous. This is how we digitize audio (moving sounds) as well as video (moving pictures), creating the illusion of continuous motion.

      So we, in effect CONSTRUCT the sense of time and motion. Jay Garfield talks about how we also construct aspects of reality such as color: https://hyp.is/go?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdocdrop.org%2Fvideo%2FHRuOEfnqV6g%2F&group=world

      Color and time are constructed based on the organisms specific perceptual structures. The snail constructs time differently than a human does.

    1. using the currency that counts, your time.

      Time is a useful and relatively equal "currency" that can be used across time for comparison.

      One might wish to add corrections for increasing health and lifespans however as this means more lived time for the average person.

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  8. Jun 2022
    1. If we overlay the four steps of CODE onto the model ofdivergence and convergence, we arrive at a powerful template forthe creative process in our time.

      The way that Tiago Forte overlaps the idea of C.O.D.E. (capture/collect, organize, distill, express) with the divergence/convergence model points out some primary differences of his system and that of some of the more refined methods of maintaining a zettelkasten.

      A flattened diamond shape which grows from a point on the left so as to indicate divergence from a point to the diamond's wide middle which then decreases to the right to indicate convergence  to the opposite point. Overlapping this on the right of the diamond are the words "capture" and "organize" while the converging right side is overlaid with "distill" and "express". <small>Overlapping ideas of C.O.D.E. and divergence/convergence from Tiago Forte's book Building a Second Brain (Atria Books, 2022) </small>

      Forte's focus on organizing is dedicated solely on to putting things into folders, which is a light touch way of indexing them. However it only indexes them on one axis—that of the folder into which they're being placed. This precludes them from being indexed on a variety of other axes from the start to other places where they might also be used in the future. His method requires more additional work and effort to revisit and re-arrange (move them into other folders) or index them later.

      Most historical commonplacing and zettelkasten techniques place a heavier emphasis on indexing pieces as they're collected.

      Commonplacing creates more work on the user between organizing and distilling because they're more dependent on their memory of the user or depending on the regular re-reading and revisiting of pieces one may have a memory of existence. Most commonplacing methods (particularly the older historic forms of collecting and excerpting sententiae) also doesn't focus or rely on one writing out their own ideas in larger form as one goes along, so generally here there is a larger amount of work at the expression stage.

      Zettelkasten techniques as imagined by Luhmann and Ahrens smooth the process between organization and distillation by creating tacit links between ideas. This additional piece of the process makes distillation far easier because the linking work has been done along the way, so one only need edit out ideas that don't add to the overall argument or piece. All that remains is light editing.

      Ahrens' instantiation of the method also focuses on writing out and summarizing other's ideas in one's own words for later convenient reuse. This idea is also seen in Bruce Ballenger's The Curious Researcher as a means of both sensemaking and reuse, though none of the organizational indexing or idea linking seem to be found there.


      This also fits into the diamond shape that Forte provides as the height along the vertical can stand in as a proxy for the equivalent amount of work that is required during the overall process.

      This shape could be reframed for a refined zettelkasten method as an indication of work


      Forte's diamond shape provided gives a visual representation of the overall process of the divergence and convergence.

      But what if we change that shape to indicate the amount of work that is required along the steps of the process?!

      Here, we might expect the diamond to relatively accurately reflect the amounts of work along the path.

      If this is the case, then what might the relative workload look like for a refined zettelkasten? First we'll need to move the express portion between capture and organize where it more naturally sits, at least in Ahren's instantiation of the method. While this does take a discrete small amount of work and time for the note taker, it pays off in the long run as one intends from the start to reuse this work. It also pays further dividends as it dramatically increases one's understanding of the material that is being collected, particularly when conjoined to the organization portion which actively links this knowledge into one's broader world view based on their notes. For the moment, we'll neglect the benefits of comparison of conjoined ideas which may reveal flaws in our thinking and reasoning or the benefits of new questions and ideas which may arise from this juxtaposition.

      Graphs of commonplace book method (collect, organize, distill, express) versus zettelkasten method (collect, express, organize (index/link), and distill (edit)) with work on the vertical axis and time/methods on the horizontal axis. While there is similar work in collection the graph for the zettelkasten is overall lower and flatter and eventually tails off, the commonplace slowly increases over time.

      This sketch could be refined a bit, but overall it shows that frontloading the work has the effect of dramatically increasing the efficiency and productivity for a particular piece of work.

      Note that when compounded over a lifetime's work, this diagram also neglects the productivity increase over being able to revisit old work and re-using it for multiple different types of work or projects where there is potential overlap, not to mention the combinatorial possibilities.

      --

      It could be useful to better and more carefully plot out the amounts of time, work/effort for these methods (based on practical experience) and then regraph the resulting power inputs against each other to come up with a better picture of the efficiency gains.

      Is some of the reason that people are against zettelkasten methods that they don't see the immediate gains in return for the upfront work, and thus abandon the process? Is this a form of misinterpreted-effort hypothesis at work? It can also be compounded at not being able to see the compounding effects of the upfront work.

      What does research indicate about how people are able to predict compounding effects over time in areas like money/finance? What might this indicate here? Humans definitely have issues seeing and reacting to probabilities in this same manner, so one might expect the same intellectual blindness based on system 1 vs. system 2.


      Given that indexing things, especially digitally, requires so little work and effort upfront, it should be done at the time of collection.


      I'll admit that it only took a moment to read this highlighted sentence and look at the related diagram, but the amount of material I was able to draw out of it by reframing it, thinking about it, having my own thoughts and ideas against it, and then innovating based upon it was incredibly fruitful in terms of better differentiating amongst a variety of note taking and sense making frameworks.

      For me, this is a great example of what reading with a pen in hand, rephrasing, extending, and linking to other ideas can accomplish.

  9. May 2022
    1. Sponsorship allows me to focus my efforts on open source software. I also provide professional consulting services.
    1. As for publishing this as an actual gem on rubygems.org...I have enough open source I'm involved in all ready (or too much, as my wife would probably say) and I'm not really interested in maintaining another gem.
    1. We reduce risk in the shaping process by solving open questions before we commit the project to a time box.

      We don't give a project to a team that still has rabbit holes or tangled interdependencies.

  10. Apr 2022
    1. But in thinking about providing a permanent home for my writing on the web, this kind of chronology isn’t very useful. Who cares that I wrote this post in 2015, and this one in 2017? Organizing posts that way is only useful if someone is reading along as the collection is being written. For a permanent writing home, with writing from a year ago as well as writing from ten years ago, chronological order isn’t that useful. Who’s going to sift through a hundred pages of old posts?

      Part of the question about the ordering of posts on a website comes down first to what the actual content is. Is it posts, pages, articles about particular topics, short notes?

      Most blogs typically default to a particular time ordered display, but also provide search and archives for content by topical headings (tags/categories) as well. Digital gardens and wikis are set up with no particular hierarchies and one is encouraged to wander. Most social media notes and photos are created in a time only order.

      There aren't enough online zettelkasten yet to look at what that might entail, though affordances there are likely to be similar to that of digital gardens which let you pick out something via keyword and then follow links from one thing to the next.

      These are interesting questions for publishers as much as they are from anticipating what one's intended or imagined audience might be looking for.

    1. students is the need to have realistic expectations and exercise responsibility in course enrollment by ascertaining beforehand the time, effort, prior knowledge, volume, and quality of work required

    2. Most group projects require extra time (Goold, Craig, & Coldwell, 2008), and groups must take responsibility for organizing their collaboration and individual inputs (Lizzio & Wilson, 2005).

  11. Mar 2022
    1. The movements of the Sun serve as a timepiece that functions ondifferent scales: daily, seasonally and annually.

      The movements of the sun throughout the year function as a timepiece at various scales to indicate days, seasons, and years.

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    Annotators

    1. He was, after all, one of the most influential promoters of the "school-as-factory" narrative: that the origins of mass schooling are inextricably bound to the need to reshape a rebellious farming nation's sons and daughters into a docile, industrial workforce.

      John Taylor Gatto is one of the most influential promoters of the "school-as-factory" narrative.

    1. But I take comfort in knowing the past is there, if I want it.

      I can appreciate this aspect of things. The issue is the time to put it all together...

    1. Democratic processes take time. The goal of a legislation-writing genex is not necessarily to speed the process or increase the number of bills, but to engage a wider circle of stakeholders, support thoughtful deliberation, and improve the quality of the resulting legislation.

      What are the problems here in such a democratic process online or even in a modern context?

      People who aren't actually stakeholders feel that they're stakeholders and want to control other's actions even when they don't have a stake. (eg: abortion)

      People don't have time to become properly informed about the ever-increasing group of topics and there is too much disinformation and creation of fear, uncertainty and doubt.

      Thoughtful deliberation does not happen.

      The quality of legislation has dropped instead of increased.

      Bikeshedding is too easy.

      What if instead of electing people who run, we elected people from the electorate at random? This would potentially at least nudge us to have some representation by "one of the least of these". This would provide us to pay more attention to a broader swath of society instead of the richest and most powerful. What might the long term effects of this be?

    2. The danger of working at "internet time" is that hasty decisions may be poor, and rapid changes may cause troubling turbulence for many users.

      In 1998, Ben Shneiderman wrote "The danger of working at "internet time" is that hasty decisions may be poor, and rapid changes may cause troubling turbulence for many users." He's essentially admonishing against the dangerous and anti-social idea of what Mark Zuckerberg would later encourage at Facebook when he said "move fast and break things."

    1. Best Instrumental Hindi Songs of All time

      The loud piece of sufiscore Best Instrumental Hindi Songs of All time is given out "sahityam" and sahityam is actually like singing the swaras certainly at any rate using the spaces of the tune. The songs of Samaveda contain melodic substance, plan, beat and metric association. This game plan is, regardless, not extraordinary or limited to Samaveda. Best Instrumental Hindi Songs of All time has two focal parts, raga and tala. The raga, considering a varied assortment of swara, structures the outside of a profoundly many-sided melodic course of action, while the tala evaluates the time cycle. The raga gives a specialist a reach to cultivate the tune from sounds, while the tala outfits them with an innovative construction for cadenced unconstrained creation using time. In Best Instrumental Hindi Songs of All time music, the space between the notes is habitually more fundamental than the authentic notes, and it generally avoids Western customary examinations like concordance, inconsistency, harmonies, or change. The foundation of Best Instrumental Hindi Songs of All time in old India are found in the Vedic association of Hinduism. The earliest Indian thought joined three clarifications, syllabic show, melos and dance. As these fields were made, sangeeta changed into a verifiable kind of workmanship, in an advancement muddled from contemporary music. Sufiscore Best Instrumental Hindi Songs of All time is the old style music of the Indian subcontinent. It has two gigantic practices: the North Indian conventional music custom is called Hindustani, while the South Indian verbalization is called Carnatic. These practices were not irrefutable until about the fifteenth century. Best Instrumental Hindi Songs of All time underlines unrehearsed creation and evaluation of all pieces of a raga, while Carnatic grandstands will overall be short connection based. Regardless, the two plans continue to have more common features than contrasts. The central establishments of the Best Instrumental Hindi Songs of All time of India are found in the Vedic game plan of Hinduism and the obsolete Natyashastra, the magnificent Sanskrit text on execution verbalizations by Bharata Muni. The thirteenth period Sanskritic language text Sangita-Ratnakara of Sarangadeva is seen as the convincing substance by both the Hindustani music and the Carnatic music customs.

      Best Instrumental Hindi Songs of All time

    1. The Great Basin Bristlecone pines are an extremely rare species found only in California, Nevada and Utah. The dispersion of this species is perhaps thanks to the wind, or the Clark’s nutcracker, or maybe some other bird that is now extinct, as they may have traveled with the seeds to other remote areas of high elevation.

      Joshua tree national park

  12. Feb 2022
    1. உண்மை என ஒன்று இருந்தால் அது அனைவரும் அறியக்கூடியதாக இருக்காது, அவ்வாறு இருந்திருந்தால் அனைவருமே அதை அறிந்திருப்பார்கள்”, “உண்மை கரும்பாறை போன்றது.”
    1. Adam Kucharski. (2022, January 18). Below analysis was two years ago (https://bbc.co.uk/news/health-51148303). As well as providing an early warning about the COVID threat, it’s a good illustration of what is often an under-appreciated point: If we want to make sense of epidemic data and dynamics in real-time, we need models… 1/ https://t.co/ZdpzOq3Bzp [Tweet]. @AdamJKucharski. https://twitter.com/AdamJKucharski/status/1483368504392880128